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BMW to offer all-electric variants of X3, Mini vehicles

The electric Mini should drop in about three years' time, with the X3 arriving the following year.

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UWE FISCHER

Many of BMW's executives skipped the Paris Motor Show to hold a meeting discussing electric vehicle strategy. That strategy, or at least part of it, didn't stay secret for long, as the company confirmed the existence of some forthcoming EV models.

Both the BMW X3, as well as a still-unnamed Mini model, will receive battery-electric variants before 2021, Bloomberg reports, in an interview with CEO Harald Krueger. The electric Mini will come first, in 2019, with the electric X3 to follow one year after that.

It appears that neither will exist in BMW's "i" sub-brand, which shouldn't come as a surprise. The company already announced that it would revamp "i" to place a greater focus on autonomy, as electric vehicles will likely grow to cover several of its pre-existing segments.

The company has already seen some success with electrics, as it offers the all-electric i3 city car, as well as a number of plug-in hybrid models, including the i8 sports car and variants of the 7 Series and 3 Series. Figures for the forthcoming Mini and X3 are still up in the air, but Krueger told Bloomberg that said figures would be "competitive," which is, you know, probably a good thing for a business.

Don't expect BMW's EV strategy to stop there. Krueger also mentioned that more cars in additional segments are also in the works, but the company is going to remain flexible to determine what is best for the market."The times when a strategy gets devised, agreed on and then takes 10 years to be executed are over," Krueger told Bloomberg. "We have to continually adjust what we do and develop further all the time."

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Watch this: BMW 330e combines performance, smart hybrid drive
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Andrew Krok Reviews Editor / Cars
Cars are Andrew's jam, as is strawberry. After spending years as a regular ol' car fanatic, he started working his way through the echelons of the automotive industry, starting out as social-media director of a small European-focused garage outside of Chicago. From there, he moved to the editorial side, penning several written features in Total 911 Magazine before becoming a full-time auto writer, first for a local Chicago outlet and then for CNET Cars.
Andrew Krok
Cars are Andrew's jam, as is strawberry. After spending years as a regular ol' car fanatic, he started working his way through the echelons of the automotive industry, starting out as social-media director of a small European-focused garage outside of Chicago. From there, he moved to the editorial side, penning several written features in Total 911 Magazine before becoming a full-time auto writer, first for a local Chicago outlet and then for CNET Cars.

Article updated on October 3, 2016 at 11:00 AM PDT

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andrewkrok.jpg
Andrew Krok Reviews Editor / Cars
Cars are Andrew's jam, as is strawberry. After spending years as a regular ol' car fanatic, he started working his way through the echelons of the automotive industry, starting out as social-media director of a small European-focused garage outside of Chicago. From there, he moved to the editorial side, penning several written features in Total 911 Magazine before becoming a full-time auto writer, first for a local Chicago outlet and then for CNET Cars.
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