Car Industry

Amazon offers up car advice with Amazon Vehicles

The new site within Amazon.com can steer you to research on thousands of cars and trucks, as well as customer reviews.

A screenshot of an Amazon Vehicles detail page.

Amazon

Amazon is gearing up its car knowledge.

No, the e-commerce juggernaut still isn't selling cars -- not yet, anyway. Instead, the company on Thursday launched a new webpage called Amazon Vehicles that helps customers research new and classic cars.

Amazon Vehicles could help solidify Amazon's place as the search engine for shopping. Bypassing Google's own Google Shopping search engine could train consumers to start thinking about a purchase at Amazon first, even in the rare case the company doesn't sell the item. That way, Amazon can condition shoppers to keep coming back to its site.

At the very least, Amazon Vehicles could be a way for the world's largest online retailer to draw more customers into Amazon Automotive, which sells millions of items for cars, including replacement parts, tires and tools.

The site includes detail pages for thousands of cars and trucks, with specs, pictures and videos. While these pages don't provide a direct way for you to buy a vehicle, they do include general pricing information, like the manufacturer's suggested price.

In a statement, Adam Goetsch, director of Amazon Automotive, said the purpose of the new site is to "support customers during one of the most important, research-intensive purchases in their lives by helping them make informed decisions."

Amazon is also trying to build up a community of car enthusiasts on Amazon Vehicles by allowing people to submit reviews and photos, as well as ask questions, much like it already allows on its other product pages for the likes of electronics and diapers.

Further down the road, Amazon Vehicles could provide a platform to sell cars, though Amazon would face a lot of online competition from eBay, Craigslist, TrueCar, AutoTrader, Cars.com and others.

Asked if car sales could be coming to the site in the future, an Amazon spokeswoman responded with the company's typical line: "We have nothing more to share at this time."

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