CNET también está disponible en español.

Ir a español

Don't show this again

Samsung Yepp YH-925GS (20GB) review: Samsung Yepp YH-925GS (20GB)

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
Compare These

The Good Beautiful, photo-friendly color screen; excellent interface; supports DRM-protected WMAs and subscription-download services; line-in and voice recording; plays Audible content; inexpensive when purchased online.

The Bad No FM radio; no cradle option; slow to boot; mediocre sound quality, especially from certain equalizer settings; below-average battery life; annoying proprietary cable/charger; limited slide-show capabilities; doesn't display album art.

The Bottom Line Despite the addition of a color screen, Samsung's latest iPod killer is actually a step back from its grayscale predecessor.

Visit manufacturer site for details.

6.7 Overall

Review Sections

Samsung's color-screened YH-925GS

If you thought the Samsung YH-925GS was little more than a color version of the Samsung Napster YH-920GS, well, you were right. It's actually a little less, having lost key features such as an FM radio, a docking cradle, and a wired remote. Plus, it's still stuck at 20GB; Samsung has yet to offer a model with more storage. Sound quality and battery life haven't improved either. On the other hand, the YH-925GS offers the best interface this side of the iPod, and it supports a wealth of audio formats, including secure WMA, Audible, and Janus subscription services. It also lets you upload photos directly from compatible digital cameras--not bad for a color player that sells for as low as $240 from many online vendors.

Like its grayscale predecessor, the 5.6-ounce Samsung YH-925GS packs everything into a slim but slightly long case. Its 1.8-inch, 160x128-pixel screen looks bright and colorful--great for viewing photos and navigating menus. The menus themselves remain a marvel of simplicity, as do the player's controls. Admittedly, the large four-way control pad lacks the panache of the iPod's scrollwheel, but it makes for extremely easy operation.


The Samsung YH-925GS next to the iPod Photo.

To make a voice recording, you just slide a switch on the side of the player and start talking, then flip the switch back when you're done. Regrettably, voice notes can be recorded only as 32Kbps stereo MP3 files, while line-in recordings--which also encode directly to MP3--are limited to 160Kbps. Support for higher bit rates would be welcome, and so would the charging cradle that came with the YH-920GS. All that's left is the proprietary Y-cable that splits between USB and AC connections--not great for travel.

The Samsung YH-925GS accommodates Windows users like few other players. It supports not only MP3, WMA, and DRM-protected WMA files but also Microsoft's PlaysForSure spec and Janus subscription services such as Napster To Go. The latter required a firmware update, but installation went quickly and smoothly.

Best MP3 Players for 2018

See All

This week on CNET News