CNET también está disponible en español.

Ir a español

Don't show this again

Canon Digital IXUS 65 review: Canon Digital IXUS 65

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • 6
  • 7
Compare These

The Good Large three-inch LCD. Can play slideshows without a computer. Plenty of on-camera options.

The Bad Better zoom available elsewhere. No carry case to protect the screen.

The Bottom Line Making the most of its three-inch LCD screen, the IXUS 65 lends itself to those who prefer to show off their photos immediately. An array of colour options gives the best possible chance to get the shot right first time, so you can make the most of the camera's slideshow presentation.

Visit manufacturer site for details.

8.0 Overall

Review Sections

One of the most read-about cameras on the CNET.com.au Web site, Canon's 6-megapixel IXUS 65 is a compact little shooter notable for its three-inch LCD screen. Similar to a Sony PlayStation Portable display, the wide-screen gives you immediate appreciation of your shots. It's also pivotal in catering to those who prefer to configure/edit their photos on the device.

Design
With the LCD taking up most of the real-estate on the back of the camera, only a few small buttons and a control dial sit adjacent to it. The shutter button, power button and mode switch (for photo, video and playback) can all be found along the top.

There aren't too many cameras more pocket-sized than this. You could easily carry the IXUS 65 in your shirt pocket without looking lop-sided. As there's not a lot of camera to grip though, you'd be well advised to use the included wrist strap. Being a camera of short-stature, it's quite easy to take shots with one-hand, again suggesting this is a camera for the masses, not the experts. While a tripod socket is located underneath, using a stand for a camera this small would look unusual.

Both the rechargeable battery and memory card are inserted by sliding open a cover on the bottom of the camera.

Features
As observed in our earlier First Take, the IXUS 65 lends itself to those who prefer to view their photos on the camera, and who perhaps don't have much time for enhancing their shots later.

One way it caters to the time-poor is through a multitude of colour options. Ten pre-defined colour modes can be set while shooting such as Sepia, Positive Film, Black & White, and some variations of Vivid and Skin Tone. There is also a custom colour option.

If this isn't enough however you can also experiment with the Colour Accent and Colour Swap modes. Colour Accent allows you to focus on a colour in your shooting subject and have all other colours transformed to black and white. More practical though is Colour Swap, useful for capturing colours in a subject you might have trouble replicating on a computer. In Swap mode, you focus the camera on the colour in the subject you wish to change, before focusing on the desired replacement colour. The resulting shot replaces the first colour with the second. These effects can be used in video mode, which coincidentally shoots at 30 frames per second (640 x 480 pixel resolution), as well as with still shots.

Further compelling you to get the perfect shot first time are seven available white balance settings.

Best Digital Cameras for 2019

See All

This week on CNET News

Discuss Canon Digital IXUS 65