X

So Retro: Vinyl records keep on spinning

Step inside Rainbo Records in Los Angeles to see how vinyl records are made.

Lexy Savvides Principal Video Producer
Lexy is an on-air presenter and award-winning producer who covers consumer tech, including the latest smartphones, wearables and emerging trends like assistive robotics. She's won two Gold Telly Awards for her video series Beta Test. Prior to her career at CNET, she was a magazine editor, radio announcer and DJ. Lexy is based in San Francisco.
Expertise Wearables | Smartwatches | Mobile phones | Photography | Health tech | Assistive robotics Credentials
  • Webby Award honoree, 2x Gold Telly Award winner
Lexy Savvides

Vinyl is having a major revival.

Thanks to millennial listeners discovering the format fresh, and audiophiles who love the sound quality, the demand for vinyl records is growing.

Rainbo Records in Los Angeles is one of several record makers across the US that's stepping up to meet demand from a new generation of listeners.

Watch this: So Retro: The art of making vinyl

The company has has been pressing records since 1939, with some machines over 40 years old. Rainbo produces around 23,000 records a day and runs the plant 24 hours a day, 5 days a week.

Watch the video to learn how Rainbo Records makes vinyl and how little the manufacturing process has changed over the years. 

This is how a vinyl record is made

See all photos