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'Knives Out 2: Glass Onion' Trailer: Daniel Craig Suspects an Island of Stars

Rian Johnson's sharp-dressed murder mystery sequel hits theaters in November and Netflix in December.

Daniel Craig faces a new puzzle and an all-star lineup of suspects in the deliciously deadly trailer for Knives Out 2. But whodunnit?

Premiering at the Toronto Film Festival this coming weekend before opening in theaters in November and then starting to stream on Netflix on Dec. 23, the sequel is officially titled Glass Onion: A Knives Out Mystery. The teaser opens with puzzle boxes unfolding under a sinister version of Bizet's Habanera, before we glimpse a motley crew of potentially murderous misfits (in excellent outfits). 

Craig's master detective Benoit Blanc was first seen in the 2019 murder mystery movie Knives Out, and this time he's journeying to Greece to investigate Edward Norton, Janelle Monáe, Kathryn Hahn, Leslie Odom Jr., Jessica Henwick, Madelyn Cline, Kate Hudson, and Dave Bautista with a gun in his Speedos.

Writer and director Rian Johnson, who's also known for 2017's Star Wars: The Last Jedi, said he wanted emulate seminal whodunnit author Agatha Christie by making each new Blanc cinematic adventure feel like a new book with a distinct tone.

Netflix reportedly paid $450 million for the rights to two Knives Out sequels after the original was a surprise hit making more than $300 million worldwide against a $40 million budget. It also earned Johnson a 2020 Oscar nomination for best original screenplay. 

"Knives Out gleefully collects familiar tropes from the whodunnit genre and reshuffles them," CNET's Richard Knightwell wrote in a Knives Out review. "Johnson shows his cards with dizzying sleight of hand, revealing twists and turns that keep coming back to the impossibility of the murder and a noose tightening around the character we like the most."