X

Open-source software gets J2EE nod

The ObjectWeb Consortium announced that its Java application server, Jonas, has passed the tests needed to get certification for the standard.

headshots_martin_laMonica_140x100.jpg
headshots_martin_laMonica_140x100.jpg
Martin LaMonica Former Staff writer, CNET News
Martin LaMonica is a senior writer covering green tech and cutting-edge technologies. He joined CNET in 2002 to cover enterprise IT and Web development and was previously executive editor of IT publication InfoWorld.
Martin LaMonica

The ObjectWeb Consortium announced on Monday that its Java application server, Jonas, has passed the tests needed to get certification for the Java 2 Enterprise Edition (J2EE) standard. The move is intended to make the software, which is used to run Java programs, more appealing to corporate developers and customers, who typically favor standards-based software.

Jonas is a "plain vanilla" version of the J2EE specification and has no proprietary features, executives at the French open-source software group said on Monday. The software should be available for download for free in a matter of days, they said. Customers can purchase support and installation services for Jonas from commercial companies, including Linux distributor Red Hat. Jonas is the second open-source Java application server after JBoss to gain the J2EE certification. The Apache open-source foundation is also expected to complete its J2EE-compliant application server, called "Geronimo," in the first half of this year.