Culture

DIY a now-extinct Starbucks Unicorn Frappuccino

The Unicorn Frappuccino is gone, but you can still live the dream with these YouTube recipes.

Not everyone got to taste the magic during Starbucks' five-day experiment in serving up a fruity, colorful and flavor-changing Unicorn Frappuccino.

A limited geographic release, reports of cafes running out of ingredients and the short window of opportunity left some people out in the cold. Thank goodness for YouTube. There are now multiple recipes for a make-it-yourself Unicorn Frappuccino.

On Monday morning, YouTube's trending-videos list included two DIY recipes. YouTube user Emmymadeinjapan tasted a real Unicorn frap and then made her own with condensed milk, evaporated milk, plenty of sugar, Kool-Aid, white-chocolate chips, food coloring, vanilla ice cream, ice, mango syrup and milk.

The creation looks spot-on, from the vivid colors to the powder on top. She sips it and declares that it tastes very close to the original. "I think what's essential is the mango syrup. It really gives it that fruity, tropical fruit flavor," she says.

The other trending DIY Unicorn Frappuccino recipe comes from ThreadBanger. The host, Corinne, also samples the real thing before attempting to copy the recipe. She describes the drink as "a mango-syrup milkshake." She vows to make her own twist on the beverage.

Corinne's attempt quickly veers away from the official Starbucks ingredient list. It involves coconut milk, yerba mate, honey and oat milk. The resulting drink is green and pink and wouldn't fool anyone who has seen the original, so Corinne declares it a "mermaid frappuccino" instead.

If you want to try to closely replicate the now-defunct Unicorn Frappuccino, follow Emmy's recipe. If you want to experiment with a new concoction, try out Corinne's. And if you just want to demonstrate your firm hold on sanity, then don't make any Unicorn Frappuccinos at all.

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