Tech Industry

Open source's growing pains

Linux and StarOffice grab some desktop real estate, as the community weathers data-loss glitches, internal spats over access and external pressure from Microsoft.

roundup Linux and StarOffice grab some desktop real estate, as the community weathers internal spats over access and external pressure from Microsoft.


After a two-week lag, a flaw in the latest Linux kernel that could cause systems to lose data is fixed. New bug-tracking efforts should button up future patch processes.
December 6, 2002


Penguin Computing, known for its Linux servers, introduces a new desktop machine for corporations.
December 5, 2002


StarOffice software, Sun's commercial distribution of its open-source OpenOffice package, is making its way onto some European Sony PCs.
December 5, 2002


Nearly 2,000 supporters of Linux round off a three-day conference in India's technology capital this week, pleased with the operating system's growing corporate use.
December 6, 2002


The OpenBSD project leader accuses Sun Microsystems of hindering development of the open-source software for its newer computers. Sun is scrambling to cooperate in response.
December 4, 2002


The Windows powerhouse's CFO says the company's future growth will be hurt if the rival Linux operating system establishes a foothold on desktop computers.
December 4, 2002


Big Blue announces a new low-end server, its first Power processor-based system that can run the Linux operating system without needing IBM's AIX as well.
December 3, 2002


Research firm IDC, in a Microsoft-funded study, finds that Linux is more expensive to administer than Windows--but the cost gap may shrink as Linux becomes more widespread.
December 3, 2002