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Continued confidence, caution as Y2K nears

As the clock ticks toward the year 2000, the prevailing tone of statements from government officials and Y2K experts is one of confidence and optimism--but at least some software glitches are bound to surface, experts say.

 

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As the clock ticks toward the year 2000, the prevailing tone of statements from government officials and Y2K experts is one of confidence and optimism. Yet some are concerned about declaring a premature victory over the Y2K bug.

"I'd worry more about the weather New Year's Eve than I would about computer problems in terms of the power going out."

- John Gantz, chief Y2K researcher, International Data Corp.

 


Y2K problems still lurking near deadline
With just hours remaining before the New Year, some experts are warning that rosy predictions of an uneventful Y2K arrival may be premature and that at least some software glitches are bound to surface.

eBay to close doors for final Y2K check
The giant auctioneer is shutting its doors on New Year's Eve to perform a few last-minute tests for Y2K, but an informal poll of several other e-tailers shows that it's mostly business as usual on New Year's.

Y2K not expected to crash U.S. utilities
Despite months of gloomy prognostications, analysts and research reports indicate the Year 2000 computer problem is unlikely to wreak havoc on most of the nation's utilities and related infrastructure.

Analysts unveil final predictions for Y2K
Unlike earlier doomsday warnings, the Y2K glitch is expected to cause only sporadic and isolated failures of computer systems worldwide, industry analysts say.

White House adviser sees no Y2K computer disasters
With three days remaining before the Year 2000 rollover, President Clinton's top Y2K adviser says he expects no national or regional disasters resulting from computer malfunctions.

No signs of Y2K hoarding in U.S.
Americans show no signs of hoarding cash or taking other unusual precautions for the possible year 2000 computer glitch, President Clinton's top Y2K adviser says.

World airlines confident of flying high in new year
After investing some $3 billion to squash the Y2K bug, the global airline industry believes passengers can be assured of smooth flying into the year 2000.