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Nokia Lumia family

Nokia established the "Lumia" name for its Windows Phone 8 devices to "signify that we've been able to go a step further than the standard spec," said CEO Stephen Elop.

Jessica Dolcourt Senior Director, Commerce & Content Operations
Jessica Dolcourt is a passionate content strategist and veteran leader of CNET coverage. As Senior Director of Commerce & Content Operations, she leads a number of teams, including Commerce, How-To and Performance Optimization. Her CNET career began in 2006, testing desktop and mobile software for Download.com and CNET, including the first iPhone and Android apps and operating systems. She continued to review, report on and write a wide range of commentary and analysis on all things phones, with an emphasis on iPhone and Samsung. Jessica was one of the first people in the world to test, review and report on foldable phones and 5G wireless speeds. Jessica began leading CNET's How-To section for tips and FAQs in 2019, guiding coverage of topics ranging from personal finance to phones and home. She holds an MA with Distinction from the University of Warwick (UK).
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Nokia returned for a second -- and even more critical -- round to put its Lumia brand on the map. Its larger, thicker Nokia Lumia 920 marquee device was the first to bring wireless charging and a highly sensitive screen that can accommodate navigation with both a fingernail and a gloved hand. Although heavier and bulkier than its chief rival, the HTC Windows Phone 8X, Nokia's AT&T exclusive is also more powerful and comes in at half the price.

Nokia will need its flagship 920, and its slightly less premium 820, 810, and 822 models to also perform well on AT&T, T-Mobile, and Verizon, respectively, to help boost sales. Weak profits to date have spurred the Espoo, Finland-based handset-maker to recently sell its headquarters.

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