Get a $100 Amazon Gift Card to Save More This Memorial Day Weekend

Here's how you can knock $100 off of your next Amazon purchase.

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Sarah Tew/CNET

Memorial Day means a lot of things -- a long weekend, a good chance for camping or grilling, and Amazon’s latest Memorial Day Weekend sale. It’s also another opportunity to earn an Amazon gift card.

Amazon’s Prime Visa card offers one of the best welcome bonuses on the market. If you’re planning a Summer refresh for your home, yard, wardrobe or anything in between, consider applying for the Prime Visa.

The Prime Visa card is CNET’s top credit card pick for shopping on Amazon, and its welcome bonus is a big reason why. Most credit cards require you to spend a certain amount of money within a specified time frame to earn a welcome bonus, but the Prime Visa doesn’t. If you’re approved, you’ll receive the $100 gift card right away.

CNET’S PICK
Prime Visa
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Prime Visa

9.5/10 CNET Rating CNET rates credit cards by comparing their offers to those of their categorical competitors. Each card is individually evaluated through a formula which reflects the standards and expectations of the contemporary market. Credit card issuers have no say or influence in our ratings. How we rate credit cards
Intro Offer
Get a $100 Amazon Gift Card Get a $100 Amazon Gift Card instantly upon approval exclusively for Prime members
Annual fee
$0
APR
19.49% – 27.49% Variable
Rewards rate
1% – 5% Earn unlimited 5% back at Amazon.com, Amazon Fresh, Whole Foods Market, and on Chase Travel purchases with an eligible Prime membership; Earn unlimited 2% back at gas stations, restaurants, and on local transit and commuting (including rideshare); Earn unlimited 1% back on all other purchases
Rewards Rate
5%
Earn unlimited 5% back at Amazon.com, Amazon Fresh, Whole Foods Market, and on Chase Travel purchases with an eligible Prime membership
2%
Earn unlimited 2% back at gas stations, restaurants, and on local transit and commuting (including rideshare)
1%
Earn unlimited 1% back on all other purchases

The Prime Visa card offers 5% cash back on Amazon.com and Whole Foods, as well as 5% back on Chase Travel purchases. Plus, cardholders can earn 10% cash back or more on select Amazon items.

You’ll need a Prime subscription to apply for this card, which costs $139 per year. If you don’t use Amazon frequently enough to warrant adding an annual Prime subscription to your wallet, there’s another option: the Amazon Visa*. The Amazon Visa comes with a $50 gift card upon approval, earns 3% back at Amazon and Whole Foods and doesn’t require a Prime membership.

Check out our Prime Visa review to learn more.

CNET’S PICK
Amazon Visa
Learn More

Amazon Visa

8/10 CNET Rating CNET rates credit cards by comparing their offers to those of their categorical competitors. Each card is individually evaluated through a formula which reflects the standards and expectations of the contemporary market. Credit card issuers have no say or influence in our ratings. How we rate credit cards
Intro Offer
Earn up to $50 Earn $50 Amazon gift card instantly upon approval.
Annual fee
$0
APR
19.49% – 27.49% Variable
Rewards rate
1% – 5% 5% back at Amazon.com, Whole Foods Market, Amazon Fresh, and on Chase Travel with eligible Prime membership; Earn 3% back at Amazon.com and Whole Foods Market; 2% back at restaurants, gas stations, and local transit & commuting, including rideshare; 1% Back on all other purchases
Rewards Rate
5%
5% back at Amazon.com, Whole Foods Market, Amazon Fresh, and on Chase Travel with eligible Prime membership
3%
Earn 3% back at Amazon.com and Whole Foods Market
2%
2% back at restaurants, gas stations, and local transit & commuting, including rideshare
1%
1% Back on all other purchases

*All information about the Amazon Visa has been collected independently by CNET and has not been reviewed by the issuer.

The editorial content on this page is based solely on objective, independent assessments by our writers and is not influenced by advertising or partnerships. It has not been provided or commissioned by any third party. However, we may receive compensation when you click on links to products or services offered by our partners.

Courtney Johnston is a senior editor leading the CNET Money team. Passionate about financial literacy and inclusion, she has a decade of experience as a freelance journalist covering policy, financial news, real estate and investing. A New Jersey native, she graduated with an M.A. in English Literature and Professional Writing from the University of Indianapolis, where she also worked as a graduate writing instructor.
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