6
This content is rated TV-MA, and is for viewers 18 years or older. Are you of age?
Sorry, you are not old enough to view this content.

Toshiba L9300U series: More pixels but less picture quality: First Look

About Video Transcript

First Look: Toshiba L9300U series: More pixels but less picture quality

3:38 /

Although its 3D deserves praise, overall the Toshiba L9300U is a worse performer and more expensive than its 4K competitors.

Hi. David Katzmaier from CNET, and I'm with the Toshiba 65L9300U. This is the company's best TV for 2013 and it is a 4k resolution television. That means it has four times the number of pixels of a standard 1080p TV. The idea is to provide extra sharpness when it is given 1080p and 4K sources, of course, 4K sources are extremely uncommon today, so you mostly gonna be up converting 1080p and watching it on this television. Toshiba's exterior design falls a little bit short than some of the other 4K TVs out there that looked really futuristic to justify their high prices. This one it has a silver bezel around the edge. This sort of rounded corners looked a little bit retro. The stand matches, at least, it's open and it does allow a little bit of swivel, so that's one nice feature. Another unfortunate retro touch is the menu system. It was pretty slow to respond, and on a big screen like this, its old school graphics really looked dated. There are a lot of jagged edges in the softness. That menu does encompass the TV's Smart TV feature suite, which again is not really laid out or designed as well as some of the other TVs we've seen. The Cloud TV function as they call it, it kinda buries the best functions including Netflix and a lot of the other streaming services. There is no Amazon instant on this TV and other kind of knock, and all told that is one of the least impressive Smart TV suites we've seen. On the other hand, Toshiba does include in the box a wireless USB keyboard with a touch pad, so that makes navigating the browser in particular a lot easier on this TV. On the other hand, the browser, of course, pretty lack luster compared to what it used to on your phone or tablet or especially a PC. The other big standout feature on this television is passive 3D. Toshiba throws in four pairs of 3D glasses in that passive 3D plus 4K resolution, really helps, I'll talk about that in a little bit. First, when we talk about 4K resolution on this TV real quick like the other 65-inch 4K TVs that I've tested, it's really difficult to the difference between this and a 65-inch 1080p TV with both 4K and standard program material. So, again, you're gonna get much of a benefit in sharpness on this TV despite all those extra pixels unless you sit extremely close. This TV, despite its 4K resolution, really falls short in other picture quality areas primarily contrast. Its black levels are relatively light, again, lighter than a lot of the other budget LCD TVs that I compared it too, let alone ones in its price range. That, of course, made the picture looked pretty washed out and the colors' not quite pop nearly as much as you would expect from a TV that cost this much. There's also some blooming artifacts where some of the brighter areas spilled over into the darker areas. Off angle wasn't great and this TV did collect a lot of light in a bright room, so all told a pretty bad performer again for a 4K television. Color was pretty good and again we did mentioned that 3D picture quality. 4k resolution plus pass of 3D gives you the best of both worlds, you get excellent sharpness with 3D basically the same as an active 3D TV as oppose to a standard 1080p 3D TV where you do have some artifacts, none of that with this television. You'll also get the benefits of passive 3D which includes zero cross-talk, which you don't get those ghostly double images. The glasses are a lot more comfortable and cheaper to use, so all told this TV's great for its 3D, but again, it does suffer the same picture quality issues that we saw in 2D. The Toshiba's connectivity is amp with 4 HDMI 1 component video input and even an analog VGA style PC input. There's also a pair of USB and an SD card slot. Toshiba also says the HDMI's can be upgraded to be compatible with 2.0 specification meaning they can accept a 60-frame rate signal with 4K, that firmer update is coming soon. The L9300U is a 2013 4K TV, one of Toshiba's first and the company did announced a slew of other TVs in 2014 with 4K resolution that might improve upon this TV's picture quality. Until then, don't worry about this one, wait for the next one. That's a quick look at Toshiba's L9300U 4K television. I'm David Katzmaier from CNET.

New releases

All the things Apple Watch can do without an iPhone nearby
1:33 April 18, 2015
You still need an iPhone to set up and use the Apple Watch, but it can do things on its own, too! Fitness, music, Apple Pay, and a...
Play video
The WD Elements portable drive is a great deal
2:23 April 17, 2015
CNET editor Dong Ngo sort of explains the difference between bravery and courage using the high-capacity low-cost WD Elements portable...
Play video
Forget maps and let leg electrodes guide you there, Ep. 200
4:54 April 17, 2015
Crave celebrates its 200th episode with a human cruise control system that's, well, pretty shocking. We check out a bicycle that claims...
Play video
Send Frigidaire's Professional Fridge back to the minors
2:24 April 17, 2015
The Frigidaire FPBC2277RF is priced in the big leagues, but fails to perform up to expectations.
Play video
Star Wars droid BB-8 is real, powered by Sphero
2:40 April 17, 2015
Get ready for rolling BB-8 toys. The droid in "Star Wars: The Force Awakens" is a real robot, based on the technology in Sphero's toy...
Play video
CNET Top 5 - Crazy looking smartphones
3:36 April 17, 2015
Round, curvy and two-faced: five phones that broke the mold and dared to be different.
Play video
Faster Roku 2 masters the streaming universe
1:45 April 17, 2015
A nearly perfect mix of speed, features, price and ecosystem make the Roku 2 our favorite streaming device yet.
Play video
The Garmin Vivoactive is an ultra-slim smartwatch with a few hiccups
2:15 April 17, 2015
CNET's Dan Graziano gives you a first look at Garmin's first smartwatch
Play video