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Tech Industry: Share and store contact info

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Tech Industry: Share and store contact info

2:20 /

Find out what to do with that fistful of business cards you just collected -- and maybe how to avoid using them altogether.

Let's say you're at a convention, meeting, or maybe one of those networking events. You're meeting new people, potential business contacts, and getting handed business cards like it's 1995. It's not easy to keep up with all these new contacts, so here are few tips to help you keep track of the people you meet. You may have thought that business cards were history, but there are still people who hand them out. Unless you have an old business card binder, you're best bud is to digitize the new ones when you get them. My favorite app for doing that is CamCard. The app is available for iPhone, Android and comes in free and paid versions. It's simple. I just place the business card on the table, making sure it's evenly lit, then launch CamCard and hit take photo. Once you get a snap shot of the card, the Apple almost immediately transcribed the info and it let you create a new contact. It's surprisingly accurate. So, get it, try it, and if you like it that much, pick up the paid version, which gives you access to unlimited scans. Now, what if you ran into someone without a business card? Tried and true, my favorite app is Bump. So, you meet someone new, you've broken the ice and you're ready to exchange info. Both of you launch the app and tap your phones together for a little smooch. Tap, connect, and that person's contact info will be saved in the app along with other contacts you've bumped into. You can also add them on Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter or message them from within the app. Now, what's the best way to share your contact info without business cards? Some of the cooler methods are with QR Codes and NFC. Websites like Jumpscan let you create QR codes that when scanned it lead to your contact info, and if you have an NFC enabled phone like the Samsung Galaxy S3, you can create an NFC tag that takes a scanner to a contact card or even your website. Check out howto.cnet.com for all the details on programming your own QR codes and NFC tags. As always, hit me up on Twitter with any questions or just to say what's up. For CNET, I'm Sharon Vaknin.
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