This content is rated TV-MA, and is for viewers 18 years or older. Are you of age?
Sorry, you are not old enough to view this content.
Tech Industry: Share and store contact info
About Video Transcript

Tech Industry: Share and store contact info

2:20 /

Find out what to do with that fistful of business cards you just collected -- and maybe how to avoid using them altogether.

Let's say you're at a convention, meeting, or maybe one of those networking events. You're meeting new people, potential business contacts, and getting handed business cards like it's 1995. It's not easy to keep up with all these new contacts, so here are few tips to help you keep track of the people you meet. You may have thought that business cards were history, but there are still people who hand them out. Unless you have an old business card binder, you're best bud is to digitize the new ones when you get them. My favorite app for doing that is CamCard. The app is available for iPhone, Android and comes in free and paid versions. It's simple. I just place the business card on the table, making sure it's evenly lit, then launch CamCard and hit take photo. Once you get a snap shot of the card, the Apple almost immediately transcribed the info and it let you create a new contact. It's surprisingly accurate. So, get it, try it, and if you like it that much, pick up the paid version, which gives you access to unlimited scans. Now, what if you ran into someone without a business card? Tried and true, my favorite app is Bump. So, you meet someone new, you've broken the ice and you're ready to exchange info. Both of you launch the app and tap your phones together for a little smooch. Tap, connect, and that person's contact info will be saved in the app along with other contacts you've bumped into. You can also add them on Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter or message them from within the app. Now, what's the best way to share your contact info without business cards? Some of the cooler methods are with QR Codes and NFC. Websites like Jumpscan let you create QR codes that when scanned it lead to your contact info, and if you have an NFC enabled phone like the Samsung Galaxy S3, you can create an NFC tag that takes a scanner to a contact card or even your website. Check out howto.cnet.com for all the details on programming your own QR codes and NFC tags. As always, hit me up on Twitter with any questions or just to say what's up. For CNET, I'm Sharon Vaknin.
  • This is the interactive sidebar!

    Click any icon for more information as they appear--don't worry, we'll pause the video and wait for you to come back.

  • Links Polls Galleries
  • Video Review

New releases

Press record for new iPads, Nexuses...
36:18 October 23, 2014
Grab a blank tape for a new podcast featuring the new iPads, Google Nexus 6 and 9, and a Spotify-powered cassette...
Play video
The CraveCast remakes democracy...
34:26 October 22, 2014
In a special holiday CraveCast, we look forward to Halloween and plan ways to stay safe when the world is...
Play video
Tomorrow Daily 073: Robot actors,...
21:31 October 22, 2014
On today's show, we check out a gadget for your shoe that might help you escape a bad date, this year's updates...
Play video
Use your Android as a dSLR rem...
2:10 October 22, 2014
Some Android handsets have the capability to act as an infrared remote for a dSLR. CNET's Lexy Savvides shows...
Play video
Apple Pay sees problems as users...
2:59 October 22, 2014
Bank of America apologizes for a glitch that's causing duplicate Apple Pay charges. Also, Google creates a...
Play video
The LG Tribute is cheap and ch...
1:15 October 22, 2014
Virgin Mobile's LG Tribute is a winning budget Android.
Play video
Cree continues to shine with its...
1:54 October 22, 2014
At less than $20, there's a lot to like about Cree's bigger, brighter bulb
Play video
The 404 Show 1,569: ApplePay double-charging,...
20:30 October 22, 2014
Bridget Carey returns to the show to talk about ApplePay double-charging some Bank of America customers, a...
Play video