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How To Video: Set up parental controls on the Xbox One

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How To Video: Set up parental controls on the Xbox One

1:43 /

Inappropriate games, movies, music, apps, and more can be blocked using Microsoft's advanced parental controls. Here's what you need to know.

There's nothing like bashing skulls and killing zombies in Dead Rising 3 on the Xbox One. This violent video game is just one of a handful launch titles that will be available alongside Microsoft's console on November 20nd. Like Sony with the PlayStation 4, Microsoft included advance parental controls for the Xbox One, that prevent your kids from accessing inappropriate content. When you're on your console's main screen, tap the menu button which represented by three horizontal lines on the controller, select settings and scroll down to privacy and online safety. From here you can choose from three defaults; for children, teens and adult for controlling privacy settings. Each default can be customize to your liking or you can even create your own from scratch. On the right under content restrictions, you will find options that'll restrict certain games and features. To block inappropriate games, movies, music and apps, click on the access to content option and choose the age restriction you'd like to set. Inside the web filtering settings, you can configure the system to block various websites, while the descriptions in the One guide option gives you the ability to block explicit TV descriptions. You can also opt at a various promotional emails inside the contact preferences. Once everything is set to your liking, go to settings and click on sign in security and pass key, from here you must create six digit key that's required to play games and access content that you deemed inappropriate. For more tips like these, visit howto. Cnet.com. From Cnet, I'm Dan Graziano.

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