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First Look: Philips PFL5706/F7
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First Look: Philips PFL5706/F7

3:16 /

While the Philips PFL5706/F7's MediaConnect option may speak to PC-centric video-streaming fans, other buyers might balk at the TV's picture-quality and control flaws.

Hi, I'm David Katzmaier, senior editor from CNET, and I'm sitting next to Philips 40PFL5706/F7 series. It's the 40-inch member of the series, but TV also comes in 46 and 55-inch sizes. This review will apply to all of them. This is Philips less expensive TV that has its Wi-Fi media connect. That feature allows the Philips screen to display whatever is on your wireless laptop screen without any wire. So, we'll get to that in a little bit, but first take a look at this TVs exterior. It's pretty generic. The only real accent is these rounded corners here. They are matched by the rounded base. The stand itself is not swivel, however. This is a non-LED TV. So you can see it's pretty thick about 4.3 inches when seen from the side. That's actually thicker than a lot of the other non-LED TVs out there, but again not really an issue unless you're watching TV from the side. Also equipped this TV with Wi-Fi built in, which is a nice touch for real to the inexpensive model. Set also has access to Netflix and Voodoo videos, although it does miss YouTube, Amazon video on demand, and Hulu Plus. So, if you like those features, you might wanna look for another TV. Couple of other esoteric options here including a vTuner, which has access to podcast and internet radio and something called cloud TV and widgets and another Facebook apps if you don't need anymore those. Picture settings on this Philips are actually really sparse. You can really do much to adjust the picture add all. It has a few picture presets, but changing any of them erases your custom settings. The custom settings themselves offer very few options. There is no back light control. You can't tweak color temperature, gamma, or color management. So, I told if you like tweaking the color, this is not the TV for you. Speaking of Wi-Fi and internet access, this TV has that Wi-Fi and media connect ** the PC based software on your PC. It does now work with Mac. It also requires pretty robust laptop computer, but once all those ** the way, we found that it does work relatively well as long as your laptop and your TV are pretty close to your wireless router. We can get better performance if you connect the TV directly to the router. Of course, the PC does remain wireless and at the end of the day, it does allow you to project that screen including stuff like hulu.com or whatever video files are on your laptop right on to the big screen. So, if you like that kind of functionality, it's worthwhile though notably you can get just as good functionality by running an HDMI or VGA cable or using something like VD, more intel wire with display, which of course can work with an television. Picture quality on this Philips I told is pretty disappointing. A lot of that is because you can't adjust any of the picture parameters. Colors are little bit blowing out register over accentuated making people look relatively sunburned. The TV also has relatively light black level, so when you turn down the lights, the color isn't all that realistic. The TV also relatively bad video processing, so it doesn't handle 1080p/24. You could see plenty of artifacts when turned on [unk] processing, which again can't really be adjusted. In the plus comments, Philips does have a match screen. It rejects ambient light relatively well and its uniformity wasn't bad for an LCD. The back panel of the Philips is relatively cramp, but once you return, you will find 3 HDMI inputs with a port on the side as well as a component video input and a VGA port. So, connectivity I told is pretty good. And that's a quick look at the Philips PFL5706/F7 series. I'm David Katzmaier.

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