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How To Video: Make a Kindle Fire safe for kids
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How To Video: Make a Kindle Fire safe for kids

1:55 /

If you'd like to let your children use a Kindle Fire tablet, but worry about letting them loose on the Internet with access to your Amazon account, CNET's Donald Bell shows you how to lock out the tablet's Wi-Fi connection.

Hi. I'm Donald Bell for CNET.com here with a How To on how to make the Amazon Kindle Fire Tablet safe for kids. As a father myself, I know that the Kindle Fire can be a great way to reward your kid for good behavior, treating them with a game of Angry Birds or their favorite cartoon but I also know that my kids are not quite ready yet for everything that the internet and the web entails plus since it's connected to my credit card and Amazon, I'm not ready for him to run loose with that quite yet. To keep your kids experience contained to just the content that's on the Kindle Fire, Amazon has provided a pass code lock feature on it's WiFi connection. To use it, first check too make sure you're running the latest OS by diving to the settings and looking at the device info. You need to be on system version 6.2.1 or later. Next, back into the settings menu and tap restrictions. Tap the switch to create a password and this should automatically disable the WiFi connection. To test it, try to open a webpage. You also notice that there's this key icon on the top right corner indicating that the WiFi is locked. To unlock it, click the WiFi icon and tap the switch. You'll be prompted for your password and the WiFi connection will remain unlocked until you go back and switch it off again. Finally, just because you clipped this thing's internet connection, it doesn't mean you've completely sanitized the Kindle Fire. Take a minute to come to the contact you've already loaded up. Maybe there's an R-rated movie or an explicit song or some zombie game with exploding heads, whatever it is you can erase it by pressing or holding the item and selecting delete. Amazon backs all the stuff up to the Cloud saving download it again later if you want. That's how to make the Amazon Kindle Fire safe for kids while still preserving all of the fun stuff. For CNET.com, I'm Donald Bell.

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