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Prizefight: Kindle Fire vs. Nook Tablet
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Prizefight: Kindle Fire vs. Nook Tablet

5:25 /

We'll throw the two best 7-inch tablets in the Prizefight ring to see who reigns supreme after their software updates. Will Kindle's $199 price tag be enough to take down the Nook Tablet? Let's get it on!

What's up, Prizefight Fans? I'm Bring Tong and we have a battle for the title of the best 7-inch screen tablet. It's a Prizefight Point show between the Amazon Kindle Fire and the Barnes and Noble Nook tablet. Our judges for this fight are David Carnoy, Eric Shake and Bake Franklin and the ladies man, Brian Tong. We'll take all three judges blind scores and average them out to the nearest 10th of a point. The final Prizefight score will be an average of all rounds using the same decimal system. Let's throw some bows. Round one is design. Neither of these 7-inch screen tablets is going to wow you especially with Amazon showing off arguably the most generic tablet design we've ever seen. It's heavy for it's size but it's not ugly, just forgettable. Now, the Nook tablet definitely pays attention to style with it's silver border and unique design details like a flap for it's SD card slot and corner of that you can accessorize which I personally don't care about. Now, it's the slicker of the two and the Nook tablet takes this round with a 4 and the Kindle Fire gets a 3. Next round is controls and user interface. The Kindle Fire decided that having the fuse buttons possible was a good idea but having no physical volume buttons and an awkwardly placed power button on the bottom center, it just stinks. Now it makes up for with it's custom Android interface that shines in it's simplicity and the software update makes the carousel more customizable. Now the Nook tablet has a power and volume buttons in the right place that we appreciate. There's a home button that should make things simple but their UI brings a pop-up menus, tasks bars and drop-down menus that they don't even need to have. It's not a super complex UI and it won't be confusing but the less-is-more rule should have been followed here. The Kindle Fire strikes back with a 3.7 and the Nook tablet gets a 3.3. So after averaging two rounds, the Nook leads by 3 tenths of a point. Round 3 is features. The Kindle doesn't really come with many hardware features. It has 8 gig of storage space with no expandability and it's depending on it's Cloud service to pick up the slack if you're connected to the internet. It also has 256 gigs of RAM but it's biggest feature is for Amazon prime members who have access to free media content. Now the Nook tablet is loaded with 15 gigs of RAM but the trick is that most of it is saved for purchases from the Barnes and Noble store and apps while only 1 gig is for the use to put whatever he or she wants on it. Now the expandable memory card slot supports up to 32 gig of storage and you'll probably end up using it plus it doubles the RAM of the Fire. The Nook gets a 3.7 and the Fire gets a 3.3. Next round is web browsing and multimedia. The Kindle Fire touted it's silk browser for it's predictive page rendering. It's a solid browser but I still really haven't been able to feel it's major benefits. I like how it's controls are places on the bottom and it added full-screen mode with the latest update. Where the Kindle Fire just kills it is with it's Amazon Ecosystem for media contents that integrated into the device for direct purchase of music, movies and TV shows and the multimedia apps, it supports like Netflix Pandora and many more. Now the Nook Tablet holds it's own when it comes to it's web browser even though browsing on any 7-inch device still feels pretty cramped but aside from books and periodicals, the Nook tablet doesn't have an integrated multi-media ecosystem for you to purchase content. You can use apps like Hulu and Netflix to watch movies but you'll have to manually load any music, movies or TV shows of your own onto to the device. The Kindle Fire takes this round with a 4.3 and the Nook tablet gets a 3.7. So after averaging 4 rounds, the Nook still leads by just a hair. Round 5 is performance. You'll have a hard time noticing any major differences in responsiveness or load speed butt he biggest difference here is battery life. Now, if we're just taking video, the Kindle Fire edge out the Nook by 12 minutes with a total running time of 6 hours and 42 minutes of use. But when it comes to other activities, the Nook tablet best the Fire by over 3 hours and that's a pretty significant difference. The Nook gets a 3.7 and the Fire gets a 3. This one is gonna come down to who throws the last punch, the final round that decides it all is value. If someone asks you what's the best bang for the buck in the tablet market? you'd probably say the Kindle Fire and we'd have to agree. It's 199 price point makes is a compelling value with it's easy of use and especially for people who are already part of the Amazon ecosystem. Now, the Nook tablet is a great device with plenty of app support and at 249, it's really worth that price. But it's absence of a media ecosystem to support a device that is really made for media consumption is what hurts it the most. In the final round, the Kindle Fire gets a 4.7 and the Nook tablet gets a 3.7. So let's average out all 6 rounds and in a battle where the Nook jumped out early, the Kindle Fire was able to claw back into the fight and after 6 hard fought rounds, we end up tied at 3.7 points a piece but you know there can only be one winner so let's take this to the hundredths of a point and in another epic battle, the Nook tablet comes out on top 3.68 to 3.67 and is your Prizefight winner. I'm Brian Tong. Thanks for watching. We'll catch you guys next time on another Prizefight. What's that?

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