Inside Scoop: Inside Scoop: Samsung's S4 lost in translation
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Inside Scoop: Inside Scoop: Samsung's S4 lost in translation

3:19 /

In this Inside Scoop, CNET's Kara Tsuboi and Kent German digest the recent announcement of Samsung's Galaxy S4 smartphone. Hear why the phone's features won't be enough to lure iPhone users and how the Korean company appears to misunderstand the American audience.

-Hey everyone. And welcome to the Inside Scoop, I'm CNET's Kara Tsuboi joined by Senior Managing Editor Kent German. And today, Kent and I are talking all about the Samsung Galaxy S4 which is just announced on Thursday of this week. So we know a lot about the phone already-- -We do. -The specs, the features, the size and all that but I'm more curious to hear your thoughts on where this phone falls in the landscape of smartphones. -Well, Samsung has done a good job of having its Galaxy S line, I mean, the image of it has been a little convoluted 'cause they some really low-end Galaxy models. But the Galaxy S-- that's their flagship brand. Everybody knows it. Everybody is familiar with the device. The Galaxy S3 was very popular and successful. And with this device, you know, it's not a huge step forward on the Galaxy S3 but it is taken that phone inching that little throw in almost every spec [unk] getting the screen a little bigger. It's a nice little push forward for them and I think it's gonna be very successful. -As far as the S3 users, is it worth them breaking contract to get this phone? -Yeah, probably not. I mean, you know, it depend on what kind of deals the carriers are for if they come back and they say well, maybe we can extend your contract and we'll still give you money off possibly. But I don't think on the outside, not really. -An outside of the whole Android family, is it worth people jumping platforms? I mean, do you really see iOS users hopping over to get their hands on the S4? -No I don't. I mean, I think-- if maybe but, you know, some of these really committed iOS, they always have been, they're probably always going to be. So I don't see this phone in particular making someone switch over to Android. -I think it's really difficult to talk about the S4 release without talking about yesterday's announcement. There is roughly, what 45 minute hour long spectacle for lack of a better word. -Yeah. It's a good word. -What are your thoughts on that, that whole, you know, dog and pony show and what that really says about the company and the audience are going after? -Well, you know, Samsung is always sort of done this theatrical performance thing. You know, few years ago at CES, they had a little kid running around on a wolf's head and talk about using the devices at home and that was very bizarre. And a few years ago at Mobile Congress, they had dancers and trapeze artists, so they've already sort of trying to throw in this theatrical aspect to its performance or to its press conferences. And, you know, they really can't go the root of maybe what Apple would do just having a couple of execs they're talking about the phone 'cause they may be criticized for being boring so I think Samsung is trying to do something different. I don't think yesterday was quite what may should have done as far as some of the performances on stage but it's a very Samsung to do what they did yesterday. Little bizarre, tried to be a little crazy but maybe the execution not really what it should be. -Do you think it really resonated with their target audience? -Well, I don't think that-- I don't know what their target audience is I guess-- perform this presentation. -Good point. Yeah. -I was looking at it at the same-- This phone really is for everybody. I mean, I've seen these review. Our first take we say, it's for people that really wanna high-powered Android phone and it's for people that isn't. So I don't think the phone has a clear target market right now and from yesterday's presentation, I don't know who they're going for. -Samsung is a Korean company so perhaps there's something lost in translation. -Sure there is. I mean, there's always, you know, you're talking about a company that's born and bred in Korea and they're incredibly powerful in Korea and, you know, they do have to transfer that sort of corporate image in the different cultures. And there's-- you know, that's gonna be for-- with complications and so, I think we might have seen a little bit of that yesterday. -Yeah. Well, let's hope that the phone speaks for itself. -Yeah, I hope so 'cause presentation [unk]. -Senior Managing Editor Kent German. I'm Kara Tsuboi. Thanks for watching the Inside Scoop.

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