CNET News Video: How tweets helped document Bin Laden's demise
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CNET News Video: How tweets helped document Bin Laden's demise

1:36 /

An informal CNET poll finds almost half of its readers learned of Osama bin Laden's death online through social media sites like Twitter and Facebook or news Web sites. CNET's Kara Tsuboi reports.

-Sohaib Athar was taking a break from his daily grind as an IT consultant when he noticed a large amount of action in his hometown of Abbottabad a thought that with any text savvy person would do, he began twitting. Helicopter hovering above Abbottabad at 1 a.m. is a rare event. He's put his name at @really virtual has become an internet sensation. What Athar did not know was he was live twitting the raid in which terrorist Osama Bin Laden was killed, Sunday. -The power of the Twitter network is the immediacy of it. It's the fact that people want to share and assume that something interesting happened is retransmitted among friends. -in fact Twitter and other social media outlets is where news is increasingly breaking and the people sharing the information may surprise you. -The Twitter in particular, people put up Keith Urban used to work for Rumsfeld put up this post that many people are saying is the first indication that we had killed Bin Laden. -According to an online CNET pole, nearly half of the respondents A whopping 47% received the news of Osama Bin Laden's death online through Twitter, Facebook, or an online news website. The other half through traditional news sources like television, radio, and word of mouth. -You don't go to Twitter to find the whole truth on any particular topic. You go to see what's happening, what people are talking about. -In spite of all this, Athar remains humble saying I'm just a twitter awake at the time of the crash, not many Twitter users in Abbottabad, these guys are more into Facebook. In San Francisco, I'm Kara Tsuboi, cnet.com for CBS News.

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