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CNET News Video: How apps can make you sweat

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CNET News Video: How apps can make you sweat

1:37 /

For a lot of us, starting a fitness regime is not nearly as hard as sustaining one. CNET's Kara Tsuboi reports on a tech start-up that's developing phone and tablet apps it hopes will make breaking a sweat more engaging.

Speaker 1: It looks like a standard car racing game, but when using (BitGym?) and Fit Freeway app to the iPad, the car's speed is powered by you pedaling and steered by leaning your body. Speaker 2: When you pedal or when you use an elliptical or when you run the treadmill you create this unique vibration written in algorithm which detects those vibrations and turns it into exercise speed. We use the front facing camera on the device that capture your head position and your body motion so that you can steer these games just by moving your body slightly side to side. Speaker 1: Alex (Gorley?) and his (BitGym?) co founder have the old goal of making exercise more interesting and more engaging through high tech. Speaker 2: We don't want it to be a chore, we want you to look forward to the workout and have fun with it. Speaker 1: Using the same vibration sensors, they've also developed apps that let athletes feel like they're actually running or cycling through scenic locations. Speaker 2: Your speed in real life is accessed through the video. Speaker 1: All right, now it's my turn to give it a try. I'm going to test that virtual active on the treadmill. I could do this again. You probably made my workout a little more interesting, traveled the globe in 30 minutes. Some serious athletes at a nearby gym welcomes anything even apps like an exercise to take their minds off a boring cardio workout. Speaker 2: Then there's something there that keep you going and then actually has some value to it, something you can achieve. If something like this enables me to be distracted and stay on the treadmill longer, then it sounds great. Speaker 1: So while technology can't replace the real world and can at least make the real world (??) of exercise a bit more interesting. In San Francisco from cars to voice (??).

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