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CNET News Video: Crunching data to drive in home runs
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CNET News Video: Crunching data to drive in home runs

2:10 /

The team with the best record in baseball right now, the Oakland A's, has gotten there in part by using a high-tech tool to interpret the game's myriad stats. CNET's Kara Tsuboi explains more.

[MUSIC] The Oakland Athletics have stellar pitching, clutch hitting, and a high tech tool to help beat their opponents. This would be the lineup of the last team we played. The little things matter, the team that does the little things the most each and every day. It's probably out play the opposition through out the season. The A's first base, out field coach, Tye Waller, developed a sophisticated player data base using file maker software. He's able to take hundreds of statistics every day and easily organize them to help the A's form a game plan. Okay, six bunts against left-handers, six bunts against right-handers. Waller's program keeps track of everything from how a batter hits against a certain pitcher, to his speed, to where he tends to hit the ball. The information helps Waller position the A's outfielders. He also records the stats of more than 2,000 pitchers, so he can advise baserunners. They're times at first base, if they slide-step, their moves. Times at second and various looks. For Waller, going digital has replace tedious hand written reports. When we first started doing these reports, we used to get a binder I don't know how thick. You know how big of a suitcase we would have to have to carry all those things? Now it's all in this little box or the phone or the iPad. Before every series, Waller uses the data to strategize with other coaches. What approach do you want to try to take with this guy? Are you going to pitch him one way early, and a different way late? Well mainly he's looking to pull the baseball, we're going to try to keep it away from him. After Ty generates the report, he posts them here in the dugout. So even the players can get on the same page. Waller has no formal tech training but taught himself about programming. He's been building out the data base since 2007, constantly improving it. I'm a old school guy with a new school spin. On a team with one of the best records in baseball. Go Ace. In Oakland, I'm Kara C. Boyd, CNet.com for CBS News. [MUSIC]

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