Sergey Brin

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Meet Twitter's Jack Dorsey, comic action hero

Move over, Batman. Twitter co-founder Jack Dorsey fights crime 140 characters at a time in his very own comic. Crave's Bonnie Burton talks to writer Patrick McCray.

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When it comes to hip eyewear designs, Google and its Glass wearable should take a tip from <a href="http://reviews.cnet.com/wearable-tech/glassup/4505-34900_7-35833760.html" >GlassUp</a>, the crowdfunded IndieGoGo project that was in the works two years before Google co-founder Sergey Brin parachuted from the San Francisco skies wearing the smart frames.

Tech inspired (or reinvigorated) by Google Glass at CES 2014 (pictures)

While we can't know exactly what inspired manufacturers to come with these wearables at CES, it's easy to see that Google's creation was probably not far from their minds.

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BlackBerry flirts with Facebook, and there's something fishy going on in the San Francisco Bay.

Google barges onto the Bay

BlackBerry flirts with Facebook, and there's something fishy going on in the San Francisco Bay.

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The concept of the Google Doodle was born on August 30, 1998 when company co-founders Larry Page and Sergey Brin placed a simple stick-figure drawing behind the second "o" in the word Google. This first Google logo art was intended as a message to the site's users that the founders were "out of office" at the <a href="http://news.cnet.com/8300-5_3-0.html?keyword=burning+man" >Burning Man festival</a>. 
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While this first little doodle was a relatively simple sketch, the idea of decorating the Google logo to celebrate notable events was born -- a tradition which is today stronger than ever. As the doodles have continued to grow, new technologies have led to more complex, entertaining, and creative artistic concepts. Today, Google employs a team of illustrators and engineers known as "Doodlers" to brighten up the Google home page.

Our favorite Google Doodles through the years (pictures)

Growing out of a simple "out of office" nod to Burning Man, the Google Doodle has turned into a regular decorative tribute. Here's a look back at some of the most memorable of the bunch.

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<p>The computerization of cars has already begun, but the technology will take off dramatically now with the mobile Internet and self-driving vehicles.</p><p>

This self-driving Nissan Leaf, for example, is a prototype that the company says will lead to self-driving vehicles in mass production by 2020.</p><p>
Click on for more technology that's changing the auto industry, or read <a href="http://news.cnet.com/8301-11386_3-57595738-76/how-googles-robo-cars-mean-the-end-of-driving-as-we-know-it/">CNET's stories on the marriage of computing technology and cars</a>.

Cars and computers: A look at the future of autos (pictures)

The computerization of cars has already begun, but the technology will take off dramatically now with the mobile Internet and self-driving vehicles. Here's a look at technology that's changing the auto industry.

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First test tube burger backed by Google boss in Podcast 351

The first lab-grown test tube burger is a tasty treat at £215,000, served up by Google's Sergey Brin.

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Internet pop culture with snarky commentary.

Ep. 1315: Where we have no McShame

Today we'll challenge Bridget Carey's devotion to McDonalds with news of the world's first test tube hamburger, funded by Sergey Brin. We'll also explore our Chromecast travel dreams and learn how Ikea just got a little easier to avoid.

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That sizzling sound you heard this morning wasn't your usual rasher of breakfast bacon. The big thing cooking on Monday, August 5, was the world's first burger made from "cultured beef," grown in a lab from bovine stem cells. A burger isn't always 100 percent beef, of course, and such was the case with this historic patty. Today's serving also included salt, egg powder, and breadcrumbs, along with red beet juice and saffron to bring out its natural colors. The burger was cooked at an event in London.

Cooking up the world's first in-vitro beef burger (pictures)

Start with pinch of stem cells from a cow. Let rise in the lab, add some breadcrumbs and red beet juice. Cook over medium heat, and presto, you've made history.

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Google co-founder bankrolls world's first lab-grown burger

Google's co-founder funded the project, which has seen an artificially-produced patty cooked and eaten today.

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He's fascinated.

Get 'em off! Man gets into a strip club wearing Google Glass

Patrick Hill -- an irregular visitor to strip clubs (allegedly) -- fascinates the doorman with his device so much that he's allowed into a New York strip club wearing Google Glass.

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A classic Larry Page through-the-looking-glass pose. Not, sadly, at a wedding.

Larry Page lives the future with Google Glass

For Google, living the future -- investing in untapped technologies -- is core to the culture and results in products like Google Glass and driverless cars.

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A classic Larry Page through-the-looking-glass pose. Not, sadly, at a wedding.

Groom with a view? Larry Page wears Google Glass at wedding

It's what every well-groomed groomsman is wearing these days: the goggles that make everyone goggle. Yes, even in Croatia.

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