MySpace

Latest News

<p>In the late hours of March 12, 2003, I climbed aboard a borrowed snowmobile in Nome, Alaska, and headed out of town into the darkness, subzero temperatures, and 50 mph gusts of blowing snow along a poorly marked trail. My goal was to make it to the final checkpoint of the Iditarod Sled Dog Race, which was 22 miles from the finish line in downtown Nome. My plan was to file a report for my radio station via satellite phone as the leading musher left the checkpoint and then dash back to Nome to catch him as he crossed the finish line.
</p><p> 
What actually happened was that I became disoriented in the white-out conditions and endless snowdrifts. I took a wrong turn onto the frozen sea ice of the far northern Pacific, made a panicked 180-degree turn, and then came within a few feet of running over the leading dog team with the snowmobile. 
</p><p> 
Which brings me to Google Maps. I don't think it's a coincidence that since it has become possible to navigate almost anywhere via Maps on my Android phone, I haven't suffered from another case of frostbite like I did that night in Nome. (This snowbound picture of me, by the way, was not snapped that fateful night; though, it is from that same winter in Alaska). 
</p><p> 
Ten years later, I looked up the Iditarod Trail route on Google Maps and Google Earth. If I had been able to access such a tool on my phone that night in Nome, I would have known that part of the trail runs along the edge of the Bering Sea, and I wouldn't have freaked out and taken off in the direction of the only light in my field of vision -- which happened to be attached to the head of musher Robert Sorlie. (His dogs, running in front of his sled, were not wearing lights -- hence, they nearly ended up under my snowmobile skis.)
</p><p> 
While it's true that I was much younger -- and more stupid -- 10 years ago, I'd like to think that if Google Maps had been around back then that I would have taken one look at the route and turned my attention to Yelping about Nome's surprising abundance of fine pizza establishments instead. 
</p><p> 
Regardless, my travels are now more well-informed and, therefore, safer, which is why my whole family is very thankful for Google Maps.  
</p><p> 
--<a href="http://www.cnet.com/profile/ericcmack/">Eric Mack</a>, Crave writer </p>

The Web at 25: Out of the ashes and onto the Friendster

In part 3 of his four-part series reflecting on a life lived largely on the Web, Crave's Eric Mack recalls fleeing the dot-com bust fallout for Alaska, only to be drawn back to a digital world that was growing up fast.

Articleby
play
Applebee's Restaurant takes a big first step toward a fleet of robot waiters, RapGenius site keep tabs on trends in hip hop lyrics, a surgeon gives an anecdotal review of Google Glass in the operating room, and a new USB connector promises an easier plug.

Ep. 1395: Where OK, Glass, where is the pulmonary artery?

Applebee's takes a big first step toward a fleet of robot waiters, the site Rap Genius keeps tabs on trends in hip-hop lyrics, a surgeon gives an anecdotal review of Google Glass in the operating room, and a new USB connector promises an easier plug.

Videoby
play
Shocking news from MIT, where some students made a device that will shock them when they've spent too much time on Facebook. In other Facebook news, Giphy.com is making GIFs a thing on the social-networking site, circa MySpace 1996. Video earrings turn you into a walking television, and Haptix turns any flat surface into a 3D multitouch surface. Ah, the possibilities.

MySpace all over again: Facebook gets GIFs, Ep. 135

Shocking news from MIT, where some students made a device that will shock them when they've spent too much time on Facebook. In other Facebook news, Giphy.com is making GIFs a thing on the social-networking site, circa MySpace 1996. Video earrings turn you into a walking television, and Haptix turns any flat surface into a 3D multitouch surface. Ah, the possibilities.

Videoby
play
Internet pop culture with snarky commentary.

Ep. 1308: Where we sweat it out with Sphere

Our guest today is Steve Sphere Guttenberg, the man behind CNET's Audiophiliac blog. We'll talk to him about the immortal LP, the return of music videos sans VJs, Steve's interview with Young Guru, and more.

Videoby

Recent Galleries See all galleries

Image

Bebo founder buys back social network for $1M

Michael Birch isn't sure if he can reinvent the site he launched eight years ago, but he plans to have fun trying.

Articleby
Image

Myspace cool again? New site sees 31M unique visitors in first 2 weeks

A $20 million media blitz is helping the relaunched network for music fans shed a bad rap.

Articleby
Image

Has Facebook morphed from innovator to serial copycat?

Facebook, and the entire tech industry, continue to innovate, mostly via new twists on existing technologies and features, combined with luck and perseverance.

Articleby
Image

Comcast ditches the DVR for cloud recordings

Cable providers promise new features for set-top boxes, Google gets behind the wheel at Waze, and Myspace launches an app with streaming music.

Articleby

VideosSee all videos

play
Cable providers promise new features for set-top boxes, Google gets behind the wheel at Waze, and Myspace launches an app with streaming music.

Comcast ditches the DVR for cloud recordings

Cable providers promise new features for set-top boxes, Google gets behind the wheel at Waze, and Myspace launches an app with streaming music.

Videoby
From left to right: Myspace CEO Tim Vandervook, COO Chris Vanderhook, and Justin Timberlake.

Justin Timberlake's Myspace releases iPhone app -- with GIFs

The mobile release, which includes a digital radio feature and an animated GIF tool, is part of a two year strategy to bring sexy back to the forgotten social service.

Articleby
Can Yahoo and Tumblr >>>  (Credit: CNET screenshot)

Could Tumblr turn into Yahoo's MySpace?

Yahoo CEO Marissa Mayer seems dedicated to remaking Yahoo's image and infusing the company with a new spirit that Tumblr embodies.

Articleby
Apple's future rests in Jony Ive's hands.

Jony Ive, iOS 7, and what Apple can learn from MySpace

commentary Apple's hardware design guru has been charge of iOS and its design for less than a year. His signature simplicity will soon be making its appearance in the mobile OS.

Articleby
Hot Products
Active Discussions

HOT ON CNET

Want affordable gadgets for your student?

Everyday finds that will make students' lives easier: chargers, cables, headphones, and even a bona fide gadget or two!