New York

In the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy, which pummeled the northeast United States this week, we can't help but think about how even small changes in sea levels put the country's ports and coastal towns at risk. And rises in sea levels due to climate change, coupled with storm surges and high tides, can send water further and further inland.

This slideshow highlights some of the U.S. cities most at risk, according to a sea level rise analysis released in March by the nonprofit Climate Control. The study, called Surging Seas, took into account data from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, U.S. Geological Survey, the U.S. Census, and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

In the New York Harbor, for example, (shown here), by the year 2100, there is a 1 in 6 chance sea level rise, storm surge, and tides will combine to send waters rising above the 10-foot mark at the nearest flood risk indicator site at The Battery. Below the 10-foot rise mark in New York, there are 702,867 people, 302,005 homes, and 35,237 acres of land.

Another recent study by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development ranked New York as the No. 3 most exposed city in the world in terms of assets exposed to coastal flooding, with more than $320 billion in assets at stake.
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Photo by: Flickr user thenails / Caption by:

Miami

By 2100, there is a 1 in 6 chance the combined elements of sea level rise, storm surge, and tides will rise above the 7-foot mark at Miami's nearest flood risk indicator site at Vaca Key, Fla., according to Surging Seas.

Below the 7-foot rise mark in Miami, there are 132,373 people, 68,451 homes, and 7,044 acres of land.

The OECD study ranked Miami as the No. 1 most exposed city in the world in terms of assets exposed to coastal flooding, with more than $416 billion in assets at stake.
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Photo by: Flickr user Piutus / Caption by:

New Orleans

By 2040, there is a 1 in 6 chance waters will rise above the 10-foot mark at New Orleans' nearest flood risk indicator site at Grand Isle in East Point, La.

Below the 10 foot rise mark in New Orleans, there are 342,179 people, 188,979 homes, and 76,467 acres of land.

The OECD ranked New Orleans as the No. 12 most exposed city in the world in terms of assets exposed to coastal flooding, with more than $233 billion in assets at stake.
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Photo by: Flickr user kia4067 / Caption by:

Virginia Beach, Va.

By 2100, there is a 1 in 6 chance waters will rise above the 8-foot mark at Virginia Beach's nearest flood risk indicator site at the Chesapeake Bay Bridge Tunnel, according to Surging Seas.

Below the 8-foot rise mark in Virginia Beach, there are 82,465 people, 34,766 homes, and 68,880 acres of land.

The OECD ranked Virginia Beach as the No. 19 most exposed city in the world in terms of assets exposed to coastal flooding, with more than $84 billion in assets at stake.
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Photo by: Flickr user nannetteturner / Caption by:

Washington, D.C.

By the year 2030, there is a 1 in 6 chance waters will rise above the 10-foot mark at Washington, D.C.'s nearest flood risk indicator site at the Potomac River, according to Surging Seas.

Below the 10-foot rise mark in Washington, D.C., there are 6,070 people, 2,656 homes, and 2,549 acres of land.
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Photo by: Flickr user robepossee / Caption by:

Norfolk, Va.

By 2100, there is a 1 in 6 chance sea level rise, storm surge, and tides will rise above the 9-foot mark at Norfolk's nearest flood risk indicator site at Sewells Point, Hampton Roads.

Below the 9-foot rise mark in Norfolk, there are 126,716 people, 46,296 homes, and 15,952 acres of land.
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Photo by: Flickr user eutrophications&hypoxia / Caption by:

Baltimore

By 2100, there is a 1 in 6 chance waters will rise above the 10-foot mark at Baltimore's nearest flood risk indicator site.

Below the 10-foot rise mark in Baltimore, there are 4,636 people, 3,708 homes, and 2,123 acres of land.
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Photo by: Flickr user ktylerconk / Caption by:

Boston

By 2100, there is a 1 in 6 chance sea level rise, storm surge and tides will rise above the 9 foot mark at Boston's nearest flood risk indicator site in Boston Harbor.

Below the 9 foot rise mark in Boston, there are 97,464 people, 48,640 homes, and 5,524 acres of land.
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Photo by: Flickr user Manu_H / Caption by:

Atlantic City, N.J.

By 2100, there is a 1 in 6 chance waters will rise above the 10-foot mark at Atlantic City's nearest flood risk indicator site.

Below the 10-foot rise mark in Atlantic City, there are 29,584 people, 20,007 homes, and 2,859 acres of land.
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Photo by: Flickr user ChrisHConnelly / Caption by:

Charleston, S.C.

By 2100, there is a 1 in 6 chance waters will rise above the 9-foot mark at Charleston's nearest flood risk indicator site at the Charleston Cooper River entrance.

Below the 9-foot rise mark in Charleston, there are 102,178 people, 52,594 homes, and more than 89,605 acres of land.
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Photo by: Flickr user Smudge 9000 / Caption by:

Galveston, Texas

By 2030, there is a 1 in 6 chance waters will rise above the 10-foot mark at Gavelston's nearest flood risk indicator site.

Below the 10-foot rise mark in Galveston, there are 39,811 people, 27,838 homes, and 21,390 acres of land.
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Photo by: Flickr user Katie Haughland / Caption by:

Tampa, Fla.

By 2070, there is a 1 in 6 chance waters will rise above the 10-foot mark at Tampa's nearest flood risk indicator site.

Below the 10-foot rise mark in Tampa, there are 74,127 people, 39,940 homes, and 19,445 acres of land.
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Photo by: Flickr user cstreet360 / Caption by:

Seattle

By 2100, there is a 1 in 6 chance sea level rise, storm surge and tides will rise above the 7-foot mark at Seattle's nearest flood risk indicator site, according to Surging Seas.

Below the 7-foot rise mark in Seattle, there are 3,746 people, 1,845 homes, and 2,759 acres of land.
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Photo by: Jessica Spengler / Caption by:

San Francisco

By 2100, there is a 1 in 6 chance waters will rise above the 7-foot mark at San Francisco's nearest flood risk indicator site in the San Francisco Bay.

Below the 7-foot rise mark in San Francisco, there are 15,643 people, 8,169 homes, and 2,171 acres of land.
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Photo by: Curtis Fry / Caption by:

Los Angeles

By 2100, there is a 1 in 6 chance waters will rise above the 6-foot mark at Los Angeles' nearest flood risk indicator site in the Outer Harbor.

Below the 6-foot rise mark in Los Angeles, there are 14,528 people, 8,502 homes, and 2,761 acres of land.
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Photo by: Flickr user kia4067 / Caption by:

Jacksonville, Fla.

By 2100, there is a 1 in 6 chance waters will rise above the 6 foot mark at Jacksonville's nearest flood risk indicator site at Fernandina Beach on the Amelia River.

Below the 6-foot rise mark in Jacksonville, there are 20,529 people, 10,406 homes, and 19,705 acres of land.
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Photo by: Flickr user taberandrew / Caption by:

Rhode Island

By 2100, there is a 1 in 6 chance water will rise above the 8-foot mark at Rhode Island's nearest flood risk indicator site at Newport in Narragansett Bay.

Below the 8-foot rise mark in Jacksonville, there are 14,249 people, 9,499 homes, and 9,695 acres of land.
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Photo by: Flickr user David Friedel / Caption by:
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