GlassUp

When it comes to hip eyewear designs, Google and its Glass wearable should take a tip from GlassUp, the crowdfunded IndieGoGo project that was in the works two years before Google co-founder Sergey Brin parachuted from the San Francisco skies wearing the smart frames.
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Photo by: GlassUp / Caption by:

Ora-S AR eyewear

It's hard not to gasp when laying eyes on the ridiculously enormous Ora-S AR smartglasses. But in this early stage of smart spec development, looks take a back seat to demonstrating functionality. In this case, Optinvent, the company behind the Ora-S, is focused on augmented reality.
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Photo by: CNET / Caption by:

Lumus DK40

For the best example of a personal head-up display at CES 2014, look no further than the well-made Lumus DK40. The kicker? A prototype to get creative juices flowing for other device makers, it isn't even meant to sell directly to customers.
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Photo by: CNET / Caption by:

Moverio BT-200 Smart Glasses

With Google Glass out in the wild and Oculus Rift snagging headlines, Epson is readying the Moverio BT-200 Smart Glasses, going on sale in March for $699 and intended for everyday consumers. Or, should we say, early adopters, because it’s still hard to figure out who would buy one.
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Photo by: Epson / Caption by:

Pivothead Smart Colfax camera glasses

The big, bulky frames of the PivotHead Smart Colfax camera glasses shoot 8-megapixel photos and 1080p HD video from the camera located in the center of the glasses, with buttons on the left earpierce triggering photo actions. A Bluetooth connection to your phone will also tell the glasses to turn on a row of LED notification lights when you receive a new message or call.
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Photo by: CNET / Caption by:

Avegant Glyph

Avegant’s virtual retinal display technology has been covered by CNET before, but we’ve finally gotten a chance to try the latest alpha prototype of the Glyph headset in advance of the Kickstarter campaign. It’s an intriguing, if mixed, experience.
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Photo by: Sarah Tew/CNET / Caption by:
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