The 2013 model year of the Smart Fortwo Electric Drive represents a significant update, with more power and a lower price. However, the body remains the same, funky-looking little two-seat carriage.
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Smart says it designed the Fortwo from the beginning to use either an internal combustion engine or electric drive motor. Unusual among small cars, it is rear-wheel-driven. The electric motor sits on the rear axle, while the battery module sits under the floor.
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Photo by: Wayne Cunningham/CNET / Caption by:
There is no rear seat in the Fortwo Electric Drive, but the cabin is reasonably spacious for the two passengers it can carry. Coming in shorter than 9 feet, the car is very easy to park.
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On the Cabriolet version, the cloth top rolls back and bunches up behind the cabin. Roof rails can be manually removed for an open driving experience, or left in place.
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Photo by: Wayne Cunningham/CNET / Caption by:
A standard J1772 charging port sits at the rear right of the car and brings the battery from dead to 100 percent in 6 hours when plugged into a 240-volt source.
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Photo by: Wayne Cunningham/CNET / Caption by:
Although the Fortwo Electric Drive is very short, it offers decent headroom. The seats were comfortable and manually adjustable.
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Photo by: Wayne Cunningham/CNET / Caption by:
This flashy red car had a nice cloth treatment over interior surfaces. There aren't a lot of tech options available, but Smart covers the basics, and includes a telematics system for monitoring charging.
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The steering uses electric power boosting, but it requires some effort to turn the wheel. The instrument cluster holds an analog speedometer and a simple LCD for trip information.
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The ignition sits behind the drive selector. Drive modes are kept simple, with Park, Reverse, Neutral, and Drive.
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Photo by: Wayne Cunningham/CNET / Caption by:
This optional navigation system was a bit slow under route navigation, and it had a tough time keeping up with the actual location of the car.
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Photo by: Wayne Cunningham/CNET / Caption by:
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