AroundMe

One of the earliest -- and still best -- locator apps for iOS, AroundMe, makes it a snap to find all kinds of businesses and services near you. Among them: banks, gas stations, pharmacies, and hospitals. Just tap the category you want, then choose an entry to see its location on a map, get a route, or call it directly. There's also a map view that shows all the locations relative to where you are.

AroundMe is handy not just in an emergency, but also for non-emergency situations, like finding the nearest watering hole or ice-cream shop. It's one app I'd describe as indispensable.

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Emergency First Aid & Treatment Guide

There's never a doctor or nurse around when you need one. When it's up to you to step up and treat a burn, stop the bleeding, or perform CPR, this app is the next best thing.

Emergency First Aid & Treatment Guide covers nearly every situation you can imagine: choking, poisoning, head injuries, bites, and so on. It has special sections for infants and children and doesn't require Internet access.

Alas, its contents aren't alphabetized (though at least there's a search option), and there's no option to quick-dial 911 or any other emergency services. Still, for 99 cents, this is certainly an app worth having. And studying.

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Emergency Radio Free

Whether it's a tornado in the area, a gunman on the loose, or a zombie outbreak, monitoring police and other emergency frequencies can help you stay apprised of what's happening and where.

Emergency Radio Free lets you tune into hundreds of police, fire, weather, and other live feeds from around the country. You can easily zero in on frequencies in your area, and there's even a favorites option for those you want to access quickly. It's a pretty cool app, one that could really help you stay informed during a critical time.

The free version is ad-supported; you can get the ad-free version for 99 cents.

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ICE Lite

Most emergency responders know to check your phone for ICE -- In Case of Emergency -- information. You can (and should) add an entry to your address book for that, but this app takes it one step further.

Specifically, ICE Lite provides basic information about who you are, what allergies and/or medical conditions you might have, and who should be contacted in the event of an emergency. Just fill out the various fields, then make the app as visible as possible (like on your Home screen).

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iWrecked

Flat tires, fender-benders, head-on collisions -- these are all unfortunate possible outcomes of the driving life. Assuming you're not hurt, the key (for insurance purposes) is to record as much information as possible about the event.

iWrecked lets you do exactly that; it captures the time and location of the accident, information about the other driver and responding police officer, and as many photos as you care to take.

When you've completed your report, the app can wrap it all up as a PDF and e-mail it wherever it needs to go. It can also help you find nearby towing services, taxis, and police stations. iWrecked is free.

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Kid Care

As a parent, there's nothing worse than when something is wrong with your child. Doesn't matter if it's a cut finger, a bad cough, or a simple headache -- you feel helpless. Why don't hospitals send new parents home with a kid-care instruction manual?

St. Louis Children's Hospital did the next best thing. Kid Care offers information and advice on nearly 100 common symptoms, everything from abdominal pain to bee stings to vomiting. It also provides child dosage tables for common medications and offers one-tap links to 911, nearby emergency departments, and your child's doctor.

Kid Care is simple to use, packed with helpful material, and free.

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