Apple iMac 27-inch

Here's our weekly roundup of the new products CNET reviewers liked best.

Apple iMac 27-inch

Editors' rating: 4 out of 5

The good: Largest display among all-in-ones; fast dual-core CPU makes up for lack of quad-core (mostly); finally has an SD Card slot; wireless mouse and keyboard; Mini DisplayPort input ripe with possibility.

The bad: Most Windows all-in-ones in the price range have Blu-ray; touch-sensitive mouse gestures not as responsive as we'd like; increase in AppleCare cost makes Apple's nickel-and-dime customer service policy even worse.

The bottom line: Apple's new 27-inch iMac will charm plenty of you with its screen size alone. Fortunately, that won't lead you astray. Behind its expansive display, Apple has packed one of the fastest all-in-ones available, and added a few useful extras to sweeten the deal. This iMac isn't perfect, but its positives far outweigh its negatives. We can think of few users to whom we wouldn't recommend this system.

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Price range: $1,694 - $1,699

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Apple MacBook Fall 2009

Apple MacBook Fall 2009

Editors' rating: 4 out of 5

The good: Sleek unibody design; LED display; big multitouch trackpad; long battery life.

The bad: Loses FireWire; no SD card slot; nonremovable battery.

The bottom line: Apple's latest version of the popular $999 white MacBook gets an upscale makeover, while keeping the price the same. It's a strong alternative to the more expensive Pro line, if you can live without extras such as an SD card slot.

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Price range: $994 - $999.99

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HTC Tilt2 (AT&T)

HTC Tilt2 (AT&T)

Editors' rating: 4 out of 5

The good: The HTC Tilt2 ships with Windows Mobile 6.5 out of the box and offers excellent call quality. The smartphone features a spacious QWERTY keyboard and bright touch screen.

The bad: The Tilt2 is bulky and expensive. It lacks a standard 3.5mm headphone jack.

The bottom line: Delivering an improved design and updated operating system, the HTC Tilt2 is a worthy upgrade and offers AT&T's business customers a powerful smartphone.

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Price: $299.99

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Ultrasone Edition 8

Ultrasone Edition 8

Editors' rating: 4 out of 5

The good: Compact (for a full-size model), high-end over-the-ear headphones; excellent isolation from external noise; compatible with iPods and portable players; includes 13-foot extension cable and soft goatskin travel/storage bag; three-year warranty coverage.

The bad: Extremely steep price.

The bottom line: Ultrasone's Edition 8 headphones cost a mint, but they deliver stellar sound at home and--especially--with iPods.

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Price: $1,499

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Samsung Intrepid (Sprint)

Samsung Intrepid (Sprint)

Editors' rating: 3.5 out of 5

The good: The Samsung Intrepid ships with Windows Mobile 6.5 and includes Microsoft's Tellme voice-activated service. The world phone features a touch screen, an easy-to-use QWERTY keyboard, and upgraded camera. Wi-Fi, Bluetooth, GPS, and 3G are all onboard.

The bad: Keyboard feels a bit cheap. The smartphone has a lower resolution screen than competitors.

The bottom line: While not the flashiest smartphone on the block, the Samsung Intrepid offers Sprint customers an affordable and solid messaging world phone.

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Price range: $149.99

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Panasonic Lumix DMC-FS15 (blue)

Panasonic Lumix DMC-FS15 (blue)

Editors' rating: 3.5 out of 5

The good: Very good design, features for its price; dedicated Intelligent Auto button; wide-angle 5x zoom lens.

The bad: Mixed photo quality, performance.

The bottom line: The Panasonic Lumix DMC-FS15 is a well-appointed snapshot camera for the money with the mixed performance and photo quality typical of its class.

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Price range: $158.69 - $184.95

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Pantech Reveal - red (AT&T)

Pantech Reveal - red (AT&T)

Editors' rating: 3.5 out of 5

The good: The Pantech Reveal has a roomy number keypad, a full QWERTY keyboard, a full HTML Web browser based on Opera, 3G, GPS, and multimedia features.

The bad: The Pantech Reveal's QWERTY keyboard feels a bit cramped, and though we like the HTML browser, the small screen size meant we had to scroll though Web pages a lot more.

The bottom line: Despite a few design issues, the Pantech Reveal is a good midrange messaging phone with the added bonus of a full HTML Web browser.

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Price range: $79.99

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Samsung Moment (Sprint)

Samsung Moment (Sprint)

Editors' rating: 3.5 out of 5

The good: The Samsung Moment has a bright display with a spacious keyboard. Productivity features are plentiful, and call quality is clear.

The bad: The Samsung Moment's touch interface and controls were a little sluggish. The camera lacks editing features, call volume could be louder, and speakerphone quality was just average.

The bottom line: With its full keyboard and bright display, the Samsung Moment successfully rounds out Sprint's Android offerings.

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Price: $179 with service

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Toshiba Qosmio X505-Q850

Toshiba Qosmio X505-Q850

Editors' rating: 3.5 out of 5

The good: Top-of-the-line components, including Intel Core i7; second solid-state hard drive; massive 18-inch 1080p display.

The bad: Expensive; tiny touch pad; surprisingly cramped keyboard; mute button beeps loudly when pressed.

The bottom line: Toshiba revives its Qosmio gaming line with the high-end X505. It has everything from Blu-ray to an Intel Core i7 CPU, but it also carries a premium price.

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Price range: $1,790.99 - $1,969.62

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Vizio VF551XVT

Vizio VF551XVT

Editors' rating: 3.5 out of 5

The good: Inexpensive for a local dimming LED-based LCD; can produce extremely deep black levels; less blooming than many local dimming models; relatively accurate color; solid dejudder processing; plenty of connectivity with five HDMI and one PC input; energy-efficient.

The bad: Backlight fluctuates with program content; below-average shadow detail; fewer picture controls than some high-end HDTVs; ho-hum styling.

The bottom line: Sure, it has a few flaws, but nothing fatal prevents the local dimming, LED-backlit Vizio VF551XVT from exhibiting excellent LCD picture quality for the buck.

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Price: Less than $2,000

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