Shrine Auditorium

Sony hoped to grab the public's attention and imagination on Tuesday at this year's E3 game conference in Los Angeles.
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Jack Tretton

Jack Tretton, CEO of Sony Computer Entertainment America, said the company is adding the PSP Go to its lineup, which already includes the PS2, PS3 and PlayStation Portable. Sony will continue to support all models, he noted.

This year, Sony will add 35 titles for PS3. One of the biggest, Tretton says, will Naughty Dog's Uncharted 2: Among Thieves.

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Final Fantasy XIV

After showing a video from Square Enix's soon-to-be-released Final Fantasy XIII, Tretton proves that not all industry secrets get leaked by showing a preview of never-before-seen Final Fantasy XIV.
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Assassin's Creed II

Assassin's Creed II is set in the stylistically rich setting of ancient Italy, where the lead character will get help from inventors like Leonardo Da Vinci.
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Motion control

Though it was described very much a prototype, Sony unveiled a dynamic motion control system.

The controller operates using sub-millimeter precision and can be used in first-person shooters or to wield bats, axes, knives, and swords. It can even be used to pull an arrow from the virtual quiver on your back before loading and firing a bow and arrow.

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Motion control demo

A demo of Sony motion-control technology shows the user, in the upper right hand corner, and the virtual character in the game wielding a sword in one hand, and a shield in the other.
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Motion control laser

A demo of the motion controls being developed by Sony shows a virtual laser-whip being used in game play.
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ModNation Racers

ModNation Racers will allow people to customize racetracks, cars, and racers with highly customizeable controls.

The controls feature a simple, paintbrush-like interface to build mountains, lakes, and roads and even to control the angle and direction of the sun.

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Kaz Hirai

Kaz Hirai, CEO of Sony Computer Entertainment, holds up the new PSP Go.
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Kazunori Yamauchi

Kazunori Yamauchi (left), president of Sony subsidiary and game developer Polyphony Digital, stands onstage with a translator as he unveils Gran Turismo for the PSP.
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Hideo Kojima

Hideo Kojima (left), studio head of Kojima Productions, stands with a translator before showing the latest addition to the Metal Gear series, Metal Gear Solid: Peace Walker for the PSP.
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