Of JayBird's two sets of wired headphones, the Endorphin Rush Athletic Earphones ($99) are the slightly more expensive and less stylish of the two.
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f there's one thing the Endorphin earphones have going for them right out of the box, it's durability. The cable is exceptionally thick and features a slider at the Y for preventing tangles, which can lead to wire stress and breakage over time, and it terminates in a reinforced L-plug that seems apt for withstanding the test of time.
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JayBird also includes a zippered, hard-sided case in the package so that you may protect your investment when not using the headphones. In addition, there's a cable wrap for keeping the cord in perfect, unwinding condition. The box also contains a set of detachable earclips and seven sets of eartips in a variety of sizes and textures, including one double-flanged set and one triple-flanged (to accommodate those with deeper ears).
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Both the earclips and multiple eartips are to ensure that everyone gets the most secure fit possible--an important consideration for any "athletic" earphone. However, it's important to note that the earpieces themselves are rather bulbous and large, so although they are shaped with the ear in mind, they may not fit everyone comfortably.
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Another important consideration, of course, is sound quality, and the JayBird Endorphin Rush earphones seem to be up to the task overall. We did notice that certain songs had a tendency to sound hollow and were lacking in warmth, but this was not a persistent problem--at least not enough to subtract any major points.
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Hip-hop and electronica were real stars in testing, but it wouldn't be a stretch for a multigenre listener to like the Endorphins. Certainly, another plus for some people will be that these earbuds require very little power to drive, meaning your headphone amp can run lower, thus conserving the battery of your player.
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