Meet the Neato XV-21

The Neato XV-21 is a playful-looking robot vacuum that promises superior performance at picking up pet hair. Click through to take a closer look.

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Photo by: Colin West McDonald/CNET / Caption by:

Pet hair, beware

Designed with pet hair in mind, and with features like a HEPA filter and a specialty brushroll, the Neato XV-21 might be an especially good fit for dog and cat owners.

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Specialty brushroll

The XV-21's spiraling brushroll uses a combination of blades and bristles. This design is supposed to do a better job of picking up pet hair than the standard Neato brushroll, as well as top-of-the-line competitors like the Roomba 880 and the LG Hom-Bot Square.

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Photo by: Colin West McDonald/CNET / Caption by:

Bin there, cleaned that

The XV-21 features the same easily removed, easily cleaned bin design as other Neato robot vacuums. Unlike some Neatos, though, the XV-21 comes with HEPA filters as opposed to the less effective, standard Neato filters.

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Photo by: Colin West McDonald/CNET / Caption by:

Laser guidance

Like other Neatos, the XV-21 navigates by firing off silent, invisible lasers that help it detect walls, avoid obstacles, and map out rooms for efficient cleaning.

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Photo by: Colin West McDonald/CNET / Caption by:

A familiar design...

Gamers might appreciate that the XV-21 bears a striking resemblance to a certain classic gaming system...

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Photo by: Colin West McDonald/CNET / Caption by:

Relative value

The XV-21 retails for $429.99, which is $20 cheaper than the XV Signature Pro, and hundreds of dollars less than top-of-the-line Roomba and LG robot vacuums. Shoppers looking for more of a bargain cleaner might want to consider the $239.99 Infinuvo Hovo 510, which, aside from failing utterly when it comes to pet hair, does a pretty decent job.

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Photo by: Colin West McDonald/CNET / Caption by:
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