After months of rumours and leaked photos, HTC has finally made its new flagship -- the One M8 -- official. This 5-inch beast sports an updated metal design, a quad-core 2.3GHz processor, Android 4.4.2 KitKat and a host of cool camera tricks.

The phone is due to go on sale globally this week, although specific pricing hasn't yet been discussed.

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Physically, it's not difficult to spot the family resemblance to its predecessor. The One M8 has a 5-inch display, making it marginally bigger than the 4.7-inches of its predecessor. Both displays have full HD resolutions.

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The back panel is still made from metal, but it curves round at the edges to meet the screen.

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The front-facing Boomsound speakers are still in place at the top and bottom of the phone.

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HTC reckons it's tweaked the chambers and drivers to make the sound 25 percent louder.

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Instead of just a back and home button, the navigational buttons now includes one for multitasking.

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Wait, are there two camera lenses on the back?

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Not quite. The lower lens is the main camera. It has the same 4-Ultrapixel resolution as before -- HTC claims its pixels are physically larger, allowing them to take in more light and therefore produce better quality shots. Apparently the software has been tweaked too to increase clarity.

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The top lens is actually best thought of as a depth sensor.

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Take a photo of a friend, and the depth sensor is able to tell the phone that the person in shot is closer to the phone than the background.

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It allows you to edit the background of the photo without changing your friend.

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It also lets you refocus the photo after it's been taken.

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The effect looked a little artificial, but it was quite cool nonetheless.

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You're also able to move the phone around, digitally changing the angle of the scene on screen.

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HTC's Zoe mode is on board still. It takes multiple pictures in a burst mode, letting you remove moving objects -- like a stranger walking through your shot -- or edit them together into an action sequence.

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There's a 5-megapixel camera on the front too. That's a hefty amount of megapixels for a front camera -- great news for you selfie-snappers.

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There's a dual LED flash, which can change its colour tone to match the scene.

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Tucked into those curved metal edges you'll find a Micro-USB port and a 3.5mm headphone jack.

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Unlike its predecessor, the One M8 has a microSD card slot, letting you expand the 16GB of built-in storage.

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It's not razor thin, but you'd have to be in a pretty bad mood to call it fat.

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The metal back panel is made from a single piece. Even when I tried really hard, I couldn't flex it. It's a satisfyingly sturdy shell to house all those delicate components.

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It arrives running the latest Android 4.4.2 KitKat software.

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HTC has thrown its Sense 6 interface over the top, which of course includes its Blinkfeed scrolling news aggregator.

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The app tray still has a minimalist look to it, although there's no longer a weather widget at the top.

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Changing the camera functions now means using this super stripped-down interface.

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With a dedicated multitasking button, it's a bit easier to switch between recent apps.

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HTC will also have an official flip case to protect that big screen from your keys in your pocket.

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It has a neat trick up its sleeve too. Close it up and you'll see information shining through in a dot-matrix style display, meaning you don't need to open your phone to see critical information.

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It'll show the weather as well, along with notifications.

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If you want to keep that sleek metal body looking good, you'll want to pop it in a case.

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