A special lens designed by a group of researchers at the University of California at Berkeley can turn a regular camera phone into a powerful microscope camera capable of taking photo of bacteria in florescent light.

The portable CellScope prototype is set up for fluorescent imaging.
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Photo by: David Breslauer/UC Berkeley / Caption by:
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Photo by: David Breslauer/UC Berkeley / Caption by:
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Photo by: David Breslauer/UC Berkeley / Caption by:
Shown is the layout schematic for the cell phone microscope, or CellScope, for fluorescence imaging. For bright field imaging, the two filters and LED are removed.
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Photo by: David Breslauer/UC Berkeley / Caption by:
TB bacteria shine green in this fluorescent microscope image taken by a 3.2-megapixel camera in an off-the-shelf cell phone. The scale bar is 10 micrometers.
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Photo by: David Breslauer/UC Berkeley / Caption by:
A bright field microscope image of malaria-infected blood taken by the CellScope. The parasites appear as dark blue dots inside the larger, lighter blue cells.
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Photo by: David Breslauer/UC Berkeley / Caption by:
The layout schematic for the cell phone microscope, or CellScope, for fluorescence imaging. For bright field imaging, the two filters and LED are removed.
Updated:
Photo by: U.C. Berkeley / Caption by:
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