Marked

For developers, San Francisco is the place to be this week as Google holds its I/O conference, where it's touting making devices smarter, more open, and better-connected. A huge red Google Maps marker tells attendees Moscone West is the spot Thursday, the second day of the show.
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Moscone West keynote

A large crowd has already gathered at 8 a.m. outside the hall for the keynote speech, where the company later announced Google TV and upgrades to the Android OS.
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Feels a lot like Apple

Google's stance on open-source standards is different than Apple's, but their respective events at Moscone Center are beginning to feel more and more similar. It's a full-on race to the front row when the doors open at Google I/O.
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Vic Gundotra

Vic Gundotra takes a few shots at Apple early into the keynote speech Thursday morning,
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Demo

Google TV group product manager Rishi Chandra and technical director Vincent Dureau give a demo of the new integration of Web and television.

The company announced its strategy Thursday for intermingling TV and the Web in home electronics via a platform dubbed Google TV.

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Android 2.2

Google announces Android 2.2, also known as Froyo, the next version of Google's mobile-phone operating system.
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Integrated viewing experience

One part of the Web TV experience will be the integration of content. Here, we see a demo showing an NBA game, alongside a fantasy basketball scorecard.
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NBA for Google TV

Many sites will run as-is on Google TV, but Google will also release APIs for Google TV applications. The NBA has developed a site for Google TV.
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Eric Schmidt

Standing in front of a slide reading "TV meets Web. Web meets TV," Google CEO Eric Schmidt says of the melding of media, "We've been waiting a long time for today."
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Eric Schmidt and Adobe CEO Shantanu Narayen

Schmidt and Adobe CEO Shantanu Narayen share the stage at Google I/O Thursday.
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Google TV

Schmidt brought partners from Intel, Logitech, Sony, Dish Network, Adobe, and Best Buy on stage to discuss the future of TV and the Web.
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Panel

Following the keynote presentation, Guntodra and Schmidt appeared at a question-and-answer panel with executives from such companies as Adobe, Sony, Best Buy, and Intel.
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Q&A

Schmidt leans over to speak to Gundotra during a question-and-answer session following the keynote speech.
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Free phones

Greg Allen, a developer at Demand Media, receives his free HTC Evo, which Google handed out to all conference attendees.
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Froyo

Froyo will have support for Flash Player 10.1 as well as an Adobe AIR developer pre-release.
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Open source, closed systems

With a "1984" image behind him, Gundotra recalled his first day at Google, when Andy Rubin, the head of the Android project, said that "we faced a draconian future, where one man, one carrier, one device would be our future" if Google didn't act. The clear allusion is to Apple and Steve Jobs.
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Vic Gundotra

A free, open-source operating system is critical, Gundotra says, so that developers and hardware makers can build what they want.
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Otellini

Google TV technical director Vincent Dureau, right, with Intel's Ottelini at the question-and-answer session.
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Android sales

Gundotra says that Android partners were selling 30,000 units a day. In February, they were selling 60,000 a day. As of this point, 100,000 Android phones are being activated a day.
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Gundotra

Gundotra says Google's Navigation app native to Android devices has provided driving directions covering more than 1 billion miles of road trips.
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Hot spot

In Android 2.2, you can make your Android device a portable Internet hot spot and tether it to a computer for Web access.
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Browser

The updated Web browser in Android 2.2 will be the fastest mobile browser available, says Google.
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