Android 4.4 unwrapped?

In the days and weeks leading up to Google's new Nexus 5 smartphone and the next Android version that will power it, we'll be in for our fair share of unofficial sneak peek images. Some will prove to be spot on, others complete fabrications or red herrings, but the uncertainty of it all is part of the fun. Here's a collection of images that tech blog Gadget Helpline got its hands on that may (or may not) shed some light on Android 4.4.
Updated:
Photo by: Gadget Helpline / Caption by:

Key Lime Pie

Note that both the icon in the previous slide and the version listed here represent Key Lime Pie, what KitKat would have been called before Google paired with the candy bar maker. The citrusy reference points to this as a collection of early images that, even if accurate, could have very well changed. So take this "lime" with a grain of salt.
Updated:
Photo by: Gadget Helpline / Caption by:

App tray

Most apps look familiar, but Google could add even more services to its usual lineup.
Updated:
Photo by: Gadget Helpline / Caption by:

Camera app

Filters are all the rage, and here, Android 4.4 could see more native treatment in the editing app.
Updated:
Photo by: Gadget Helpline / Caption by:

Borders

More detailed photos effects lay dynamic borders over a picture, like a filmstrip or a distressed frame.
Updated:
Photo by: Gadget Helpline / Caption by:

More editing tools

Editing choices could include cropping, straightening, rotation, flipping an image, and drawing tools.
Updated:
Photo by: Gadget Helpline / Caption by:

Color options

Google isn't usually huge on customizing colors in its photo app; that could all change.
Updated:
Photo by: Gadget Helpline / Caption by:

Camera navigation

If these photos are right, camera settings also get a fresh new look.
Updated:
Photo by: Gadget Helpline / Caption by:

Dialer

This screen clearly represents the native dialer, which gets a lighter, brighter treatment.
Updated:
Photo by: Gadget Helpline / Caption by:

Printing

Baking printing into Android means that the smartphone could more automatically and easily connect with other devices (or perhaps save an image as a PDF), without the need for third-party apps to ease the way.
Updated:
Photo by: Gadget Helpline / Caption by:

Payments

In this photo, mobile payments find a home in the settings menu, an effort, perhaps, to integrate Google services even more closely with your real-world billfold.
Updated:
Photo by: Gadget Helpline / Caption by:
Hot Galleries

CNET's Holiday Gift Guide

Tablets that put your TV to shame

Binge-watch your favorite episodes on these portable screens.

Hot Products