At the 2011 Detroit auto show, Honda unveiled a concept of what will become its ninth-generation Civic.
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Photo by: Josh P. Miller/CNET / Caption by:
We were able to check out the Civic's new external aesthetic, but Honda was tight-lipped about the interior and power-train specs.
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Photo by: Josh P. Miller/CNET / Caption by:
What we do know is that Honda expects the Civic to get up to 40mpg, matching Hyundai's estimates for its 2011 Elantra.
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Photo by: Josh P. Miller/CNET / Caption by:
The sedan, in "standard" trim, features a single exhaust hanging from the standard position.
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Photo by: Josh P. Miller/CNET / Caption by:
But the coupe concept represents what we should expect from the Civic Si, including this trapezoidal center exhaust.
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Photo by: Antuan Goodwin/CNET / Caption by:
Obviously, the coupe features two fewer doors than the sedan.
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Photo by: Josh P. Miller/CNET / Caption by:
Whether sedan or coupe, the Civic concept features an aggressively raked appearance that's not much different from the Civic on the road today.
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Photo by: Josh P. Miller/CNET / Caption by:
The coupe also features a glossy black band across the top edge of its lower grill opening, visually enlarging the opening for a more aggressive appearance.
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Photo by: Josh P. Miller/CNET / Caption by:
Smoked headlamps and taillights definitely won't make it to production.
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Photo by: Josh P. Miller/CNET / Caption by:
Out back, the Civic is equipped with an integrated decklid spoiler.
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Photo by: Josh P. Miller/CNET / Caption by:
The concept was equipped with massive brakes that we're also sure won't hit a showroom.
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Photo by: Antuan Goodwin/CNET / Caption by:
While specs are hard to come by, Honda did say that the ninth Civic would also be available in hybrid trim and in natural-gas-powered GX trim.
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Photo by: Josh P. Miller/CNET / Caption by:
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