Adobe patches critical Flash hole

A problem that could let an attacker gain control over a computer via Flash Player has been patched, Adobe says.

Adobe has released a patch for a critical Flash Player problem that could let attackers take over people's computers through content viewed in a browser.

The vulnerability affected a file that shipped with Flash Player 9.x and 10.x for Windows, Mac OS X, and Linux, and with Adobe Reader and Adobe Acrobat 9.x for Windows, Macintosh, and Unix. Adobe said Thursday it fixed the problem in a security advisory, and Adobe's Matt Rozen posted a note on Twitter that directed people to download the patched version from Adobe's Flash download site.

This was no abstract, theoretical vulnerability, either.

"There are reports that this vulnerability is being actively exploited in the wild via limited, targeted attacks against Adobe Reader v9 on Windows," Adobe said in an earlier advisory about the problem.

Flash is very widely used in browsers to power features such as interactive stock charts and YouTube video streaming.

Tags:
Security
About the author

Stephen Shankland has been a reporter at CNET since 1998 and covers browsers, Web development, digital photography and new technology. In the past he has been CNET's beat reporter for Google, Yahoo, Linux, open-source software, servers and supercomputers. He has a soft spot in his heart for standards groups and I/O interfaces.

 

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