The 'Farsighted' view of Trappist-1 and its Earth-like planets (Farsighted, Ep. 5)
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The 'Farsighted' view of Trappist-1 and its Earth-like planets (Farsighted, Ep. 5)

Culture
[SOUND] [MUSIC] Welcome to Farsighted. CNET's show about what's coming next tomorrow and way, way beyond tomorrow. I'm the host, Eric Mack in New Mexico and I'm joined in the studio in San Francisco by Bonnie Burton. Kelsey Adams, and Steven Beecham, how's everyone doing? Good, good. Awesome, no skyscrapers have fallen on us yet. [LAUGH] Excellent. Life goes on, and this week we had some interesting news from space. Specifically of the direction of the constellation Aquarius, and the star called trapist one. Which is named for the observatory that found planets around it and by the way, that observatory is named for a really excellent group of breweries that beer snubs love, fun fact. But speaking of planets, there are a bunch of them around that star, seven to be exact and all Seven, our earth size and could have at least some water on them. And in fact, on three of these planets, the conditions are actually quite good for a liquid water ocean. And I don't know about you guys, but every planet I ever lived on, where there's an ocean, there's been life. So I was thinking you can see in the videos, this European video there where you can actually see kind of an image of the seven planets around the star. It's a red dwarf star. And we've got some video from yesterday in the NASA press conference. Do you have that Steven, about what they had to say about it? Yes. This is what the scientists have to say and why they're excited. Okay. I'm excited to announce today the Dr. Micha��l Gillon and his team have used our Spitzer space telescope to determine that are actually seven earth-sized planets orbiting the nearby Trappist-1 star about 40 light-years away What's more, as you can see in this illustration is that three of these planets marked in green are in the habitable sun where liquid water can pull on the surface in fact with the right atmospheric conditions there could be water on any of these planets. So for the first time we found As many terrestrial planets around a single star and that's the first time we have been able to measure. In addition to that both the masses and the radii of these habitable zone type earth-size planets. These planets are among the best in all the planets to follow up, to see, for example, with the James Webb Space Telescope that we're going to launch last year. The atmospheres and also to look at biosignatures if there are any. The discovery gives us a hint that finding a second Earth is not just a matter of if, but when.>> The last little part there, you know, kinda gets the nerd neurons tingling. And there's a lot of different information out there about the science behind this system. We'll get into that a little bit. We've covered it on CNET And then we also want to talk about the connection between the exciting scientific discovery and science fiction. Because this system is a perfect setting for a space opera. [LAUGH] There are seven of them. They're all all very close together, especially compared to our solar system. If we have these planets close together, you can imagine having actual planets hopping. So we're gonna talk about maybe some ideas for a potential future sci-fi stories and we'll even look at one that's already been written. Somebody already wrote a sci-fi story about these planets even though they were just announced yesterday. And we'll talk about how those kind of stories maybe could help us visit one day. So that's what we got lined up, if you want to join The conversation we have chat rooms on Livestream/cnet/farsighted and also on YouTube Stream up there's a chat room there or Or if that's too complicated, too many URLs just hit us up on twitter at the hashtag barsided and I'll be keeping an eye on those if you got questions or comments. So I guess let's bring in everyone there in San Francisco. This news was pretty big yesterday where did your mind go when you first started hearing about this when it broke yesterday? Well, I mean, here's the thing. When something like this breaks, which of course, nothing like this has ever broken before, as far as news, I get excited, just the geek in me, because I can't wait to see what other discoveries they find. They said they were looking for bio-signatures, so it would be interesting to see what If there are any kind of life forms, not necessarily humanoid, but just animals or algae or plants, anything that can grow where there's water, it'll be interesting to see what they find. I just hope, I'm not saying this is the best way to discuss news like this, but Twitter yesterday was a little interesting [LAUGH]. There were a lot of people who were like well if this planets ruined with climate change. Or not depending on if you belive in climate change. If you don't, it's still happening. They were like well, at least we have a backup plan and I'm like that's not really the best. You're not gonna live. It's not [UNKNOWN] realistic. Yeah, I mean I have faith in NASA no doubt but we aren't quite advanced yet where we can just trash this planet and just go to the next solar system. So Twitter was just very interesting yesterday. I have a lot of people going well that's a relief. Now we have somewhere else to put humanity in case we **** up this planet. I'm like well, you're still bring the same people that screwed up one planet. They probably can **** up eight more so, or seven more or whatever. But no, for me it was exciting cuz any time NASA has news Of any kind of groundbreaking news. It's exciting, but it also is a good reminder that we're not the only thing in the universe. And it's humbling. It's humbling, frightening, and really exciting, all at once. I don't know if, how did you feel, Kelsey, when you heard the news? Well I'm really curious about the You know the science of it. I am personally had way too much science fiction when I was a kid. And that's don't have a clear idea of what our actual space travel capabilities are. [LAUGH] So I'm just gonna be honest with that. And say, Eric, maybe you could enlighten us a bit more. In your article it says that NASA will be. The Hubble Space Telescope will be Is already searching for atmosphere around the planet. So we do have a way to look at this? But how long would it take us to actually send a camera probe there or something like that? I mean, is that even possible? Is that something we can even do? Probably not in our lifetimes. I mean, we'd have to discover, have some insanely ground breaking or physics defying technology or discover The actual work drive. And I mean there are things going on that are kind of that far out. It's definitely nothing concrete although we've reported and seen it about the emdrive. Which means electromagnetic drive. And this is like, something that NASA has tested. That theoretically could be the foundation for a work drive and it doesn't make sense. It violates the laws of physics but they keep testing it and it keeps actually working so far And so the next step in that is to actually test it in space. And this is a pretty controversial thing. Some people think it's just an error. And other people are like, well let's keep testing it. So I mean, that could get you to like And again, maybe not even a lifetime to them. You can start to get towards, maybe light speed, maybe 10 or 20 %, if a lot of other miracles has happen a long the way. So. So, but I mean, even if you got to light speed, this is still a 40 year journey at the speed of light. It's 40 light years away, 39, actually. So, I mean, we'd have to come up with either- [SOUND] Pardon me. Either fast as light travel and then and then take 40 years to get there, so it's probably not gonna happen. But as far as the Project Starshot or the Starshot Project that wants to send a tiny, little, nano sized camera out to Proxima Centauri to take a look at that planet that's out there four years away? That would be a 20 year journey, so we'd be looking at Ten times if we sent one of those, it'd take them 200 years. So I basically, like what we have right now, we could maybe send the camera there and it would take 200 years. By which time [CROSSTALK] Yes. Would we still have the technology to read the result? [LAUGH] It's a very interesting question. Right. [CROSSTALK] Depends on the funding. Would any of us be here? Yeah. It'd be like beta max, data. 200 years I think 200 years is not that long if you think about I mean, for us it's long but in terms of space, in terms of space time it's not very long. We can still, I think it's possible. Yeah and also. I mean our country is 200 years old. This is an international endeavour so even I'm just thinking about [LAUGH] funding and financing Yeah. If we don't have the money for it, I'm sure other countries would very interesting to. They might lead the way, although obviously, we might love to, I don't know. I don't know what the flag protocol for this anymore. Putting the American flag on a planet for the first time. Or if it's gonna be some international UN, International Space Station type flag or what. We put robots on planets now. We just plant robots there. We don't do flags anymore, right. I feel so old school for bringing that up. I don't even think we do that. But I"m excited to see where this goes and what we find. Of course, everyone's hoping for Some sort of creatures that are human like or human-esque. I don't know if I'm wanting that though. [LAUGH] Well, here's the thing. If they are as advanced as we are, they probably know about us before we know about them. Yeah, they know about us. Yeah, we've talked about that before. They're already here [LAUGH]. I like the [CROSSTALK] You know, to be clear, I mean we don't necessarily have to wait 200 years at a minimum to learn more. I mean they're pointing a hubble at it and like they were saying, hubble can kind of determine, we can look for radio signals right now. We've looked already [UNKNOWN] yet. We can look, a hubble can tell us like if these planets have atmospheres. But in the next generation of space telescopes like the James Webb Space Telescope that's suppose to launch next year And just frankly kicks Hovel's ****. And then the Hovels in 1980's technology. And so, James Webb the next generation telescope, we'll be able to go a step further and we'll be able to see not only like what does have nanosphere but what it is in the atmosphere. Right. What chemicals are there, it will be also detects the presence of water. So, you'll begin In just a couple of years will begin to get a much better picture of what's going on And if there's a vial signatures of life there. You know I think someway there's going to be like you're saying a whole lot of international effort in the figuring out someway To get there sooner or maybe or to get a camera there sooner. Right. So yeah. I mean, there's a lot of ground to cover and the time thing is interesting because. So the star that it surrounds is a A red dwarf star, and it's younger than our sun, and it also burns very slowly and lasts much longer. So this star could last a trillion years. The time scales are insane. So the likelihood is that if these planets can support life. It may just not be there yet. It may not have evolved yet, cuz it's got a long run way to go. These planets will probably be around much longer than our planet is, and I'm not just making a political joke. [LAUGH] By the time our sun swallows our planet, they may be just getting started over there. Yeah, that we'll have up world colonies by then, right? Pretty more also to think about. Yeah. I would just add that I think and this is I cannot say it as a savvy performance studies [LAUGH] That's the [UNKNOWN] for Avatar we don,t wanna do that. I know, there is so many, like, it's sad because Syfy probably has prept us in every way possible of all the different things that can possibly go wrong. With this scenario and so we, as much as we get excited about the science and stuff it's still the background noise in my head. You were gonna say something earlier, Kelsey. I just gonna say to get closer together then The planets in our Solar System? Is that right? Yeah, like much closer together. So. Like Hawaiian islands close? Like you can see them in the sunset close? [LAUGH] Like so basically the entire all seven of these planets would fit in between the space between the Sun and Mercury. So they're all closer to Vera star than Mercury is to our sun. Okay. Of course, Mercury is the closest planet. So basically, like if we're hanging out in the system, and you wanted to travel back and forth between planets, you could make those trips in a matter of days, whereas like for us, with our technology, it takes what, like nine months, six months if you're lucky to get from here to Mars? So it really would be a lot more compact which is why I think it's fascinating to think about it as a sci-fi setting because with the technology we have now if we were there it would actually be a lot more interesting. We'd be making a lot more planet hopping trips, we'd get around in rockets we have now in a couple of days go visit family on different planets. My God. In a lot of ways I like the solar system better. Imagine the TSA On that situation. [LAUGH] Aah, the line How can you [CROSSTALK] Customs is gonna be a nightmare. God, I don't wanna think of the customs line for that. Erik also, they always face the star, right, they don't rotate like On an axis. So- None of the planets rotate, right? Right, yes. Wow. So there's a dark side and a light side. So it's kinda like 14 separate environments instead of 7, too. True, yeah. So that's opening up more [CROSSTALK] Yeah, it's yeah. It's not like Star Wars where you have one climate and one thing per planet. It's not like you have a Degobah planet, a Kashyyk planet, A hot planet. And I'm a nerd. [LAUGH] No, no. There's one city on every planet. Exactly, exactly. That would be interesting, cuz I bet you the life forms, if there are any, which I'm hoping there are, are going to be very interesting. It's kind of like the ocean, where you have Very interesting types of species of fish and marine life that can see sunlight and then the further you go down deep into the ocean the creepier and weirder the look that don't need sunlight, but there is still plenty, I'm a recovering Goth I should call it creepy, but Yeah. It'll be interesting to see if they find anything. Again, the science part of me is very excited about seeing life forms. I'm more excited about plant life, to tell you the truth. I want to see what kind of plants are on these planets. But hopefully nothing that will kill us all. Hey Eric, why are you more excited about plant life? I don't know. For me, I'm a big insect nerd and botany nerd. So for me When I do world building in sci fi realms, I'm more excited about like the landscape and the bugs and the plants than I ever am about, anything else. I don't know why. Hopefully one of these planets has honey bees. That's all I care about. Like, if there's a way to like recover our honey bee population by bringing them over here that would be awesome. But again, I mean, this is 200 years In the future, who knows if we're even gonna exist then. So your CARE package [UNKNOWN] there would be a box of bees. A box of bees, I would, yeah. Apiaries everywhere, yeah. [LAUGH] Sorry. So everyone is excited about maybe finding molecular oxygen around [UNKNOWN] And you're like bring the CO2. Bring the bees. [LAUGH] Yeah, bring the plants and the bees since we're destroying everything over here. [LAUGH] No, it'll be interesting, and again this is a slow burn, you know, this is exciting news that happened right away, but then finding out, moving forward finding out what's actually on these planets may take a little bit longer, so Other than just the atmosphere. I mean if we wanna actually see what's on the planets. Now I'm feeling like I'm bum than everybody else. So. [LAUGH] Hey, Eric. When I first heard this news, the first thing I thought of was Proxima b. You're right. So that's very similar, right? I mean, but that was just one giant planet. Like, almost twice the size of earth. Yeah. Like how do they compare it with what NASA announced yesterday? So the data that we have for these planets is a lot more certain that they exist the way that astronomers think they do, there's more data on it, and if you want to get technical with that, that's because these planets transit which means they from when we look at them with Hubbell or with our telescopes We're trap the beer telescope, [LAUGH] When we look at it with our beer telescope here on earth, we can, we're at angle where you can actually see these planets passing in front of the start and so you can record the depth in that right from the star and that gives you a much better A much better idea of the planet being there, whereas with Proxima B that doesn't actually transit, they think that's there just because of, basically kind of like ripples in the signal from, in the light from Proxima Centauri that's caused by the gravity of a planet being there. So that's like a little less certain method. I see. I see. Depending on who you asked. They're looking at objects kind of wobbling in space, moving in the foreground as oppose to seeing through them directly. Yeah right. Proximus Centauri has a wobble that makes us think there's a planet there. Whereas Trapis one, we have seen the dip in the life from that star caused by these planets, and they've observed it dozens of times. And what's the latest on the star we're not supposed to call the tabby star, but I don't remember the actual number? [INAUDIBLE] star. I think that's just because normally With male astronomers, stars get named after their last names. [LAUGH] For some reason- Completely understand, I just- Yeah, yeah. What are all the different planets' names? Have we named them all? I think they're, right now, they're just Trappist-B, Trappist-A, stuff like that. Yeah, like 1F. Yeah, okay. Cuz we're not. Right. Yeah, it's kind of like that Columbus situation. Like do we get to name it or do the people that live there get to name it? [LAUGH] But Kelsey, with Boyajian Star or Tabby's Star, I think that was the star for people that don't remember, where there was some crazy stuff going on with the light that we were seeing. From that star. Where was dipping and like dimming over time. And so one hypothesis was, is somebody building like a Dyson sphere on this? There's like a super advanced civilization in there blocking out their own sun to suck up the power from it. And there's like a dozen difference theories about what that could be. Like the last one I saw Was that they think, some sort of a collision happened, that is causing the dust from some sort of a collision in that system is causing the dimming. But, definitely, that's one that's still being studied quite a bit. Hey Eric, we actually had some questions in the chatroom. So, Sal Krishna Sisala He's saying, how do you know if there's oxygen on that planet? Do you have an idea how they do that? I do, you should go to [UNKNOWN], go on YouTube and find a video that explains astronomical spectroscopy or astronomy and spectroscopy to get a better explanation than what I can give you. That's gonna be more accurate. But the basic The basic idea is that scientists can measure the spectrum of light, this coming from these stars and then when planet passes in front of the light from that star, there's the dip that I mentioned. It shows there's somethings there but then they can also Measure what is being blocked out in that spectrum. So, like, oxygen absorbs certain part of the spectrum. Do does frequencies of light, right?>> Yeah.>> Yeah, yeah. So, you can look at the spectrum of a star and be like, when this planet passes in front, all of a sudden the oxygen Is like, a signature is blocked out. That's how they would determine what's in the atmosphere of a planet. And that has a lot to do with star luminosity. That's how all those women astronomers figured out how to measure what stars are burning, whether or not they're burning oxygen or helium or whatever Based on the luminosity of the star, and that was a bunch of women astronomers who figured that out, Mm-hm Right Like a big team of them, I forget what they were called, but I wish I knew what they were called. [LAUGH] But yeah that's how they measure a lot of that stuff. There's, I know, it might be appropriate to bring it up now, at the end of the rundown I've got a clip from Sara Seager, I don't know if you've got that cued up. Yeah yeah yeah, let me grab it. And she's kinda like the rock star of exoplanetology. I forget if that's what they're calling it. Planetary science, that's a better thing to call it. It's the Harvard Computers, by the way, that group of women. What was the name of it? They were called the Harvard Computers, were the women. Okay, cool, cool, cool. Yeah. Interesting. The Harvard Computers. Okay yeah, I have that video right here, let's check it out. I just kinda, I love what Sara Seager had to say at the NASA press conference, we can play here and its starts with a kind of a sick burn, so what is? [LAUGH]. [BLANK_AUDIO] [INAUDIBLE] Well, I give two favorite reasons, one is when I another started [UNKNOWN] planets 20 years ago our [INAUDIBLE] As just stamp collecting. We'd never look at our atmospheres. We'd never be able to do this, we'd never be able to do that. So, the fact that we're here today with seven planets, and we know we can study their atmospheres in the future, is truly tremendous. The other point I want to make is that we're really excited, because we all see ourselves here as just, we're the group of people, we meaning us and all of our colleagues, As the pioneers, this is a search that will go on for many generations. The fact that we're this close now to finding so many habitable worlds is really exciting. So what was the burn that she said her former colleagues considered She said Stamp collecting? She said stamp collecting [LAUGHING] I mean this was kind of, I mean searching for planets was kind of the joke of Astronomy and astrophysics back before they started finding them all over the place so. They kind of thought the same thing about the astronomer women when they were figuring out luminosities of stars. And like they didn't really realize that they were figuring out THat they can figure out the size, the shape, the density of stars and everyone is like, let them do their thing. Then they like discovered how to measure all the universe. [UNKNOWN] I mean, to be honest though, all scientific discoveries start with ridicule. It starts with, Sure. others such as you peers going, could be a dreamer quite, stop wasting your time on this but likely people continue to. Waste their time on something that turns out to be a giant scientific discovery so- It happens with every- Every single- Every nature- Every single- Copernicus- All of it. All the way back. All of it. Yeah. So I'm glad these people didn't give up. I'm glad they kept stamp collecting for our sakes. Yeah, thank you. Yeah. And then, I think where our expertise could be here is, and I think that's also where science fiction comes in though, because it's like a double edge sword. Like you were saying earlier, Bonnie, science fiction has desensitized us and it's so much flashier than the reality. This has prepared us. It's prepared us but also, that's the problem of generations and generations of People that were raised on pop culture, as opposed to hard science. I mean, there are definitely people out there that care about the science, clearly. I mean, we write about quite a bit of the science on CNET. But it's the pop culture, I think, that drives a lot of just the mainstream interest in stuff like this, because they want what they see. It's kinda like the dichotomy of when you're on jury duty Versus Law and Order, right? Any kind of TV show that you watch that has a jury on it, you want that dynamic. You want it to be exciting. You want, like, closing arguments to be thrilling. You want the murderer, you know, the mystery to whatever. And you get jury duty and boring. [LAUGH] Cuz none of the lawyers are actors. None of the lawyers, you know, have a presences. There's no, you know, three-act. All of the excitement. You don't get to see what the detectives do. It's the same thing if you go to Forensic Science. It's not CSI. You now, you as a forensic scientist will never interview or interrogate a suspect. You know, that's not your job. Your job is to wear a lab coat and to find results that will then be later used in a trial. You might be asked to be on it. A trial, but you aren't gonna be interrogated. And so for science like this it's the same kind of thing, we want Star Wars, we want Star Trek, we want instant gratification and it's hard for us to be patient with NASA, because they're working as fast a they can but also it takes a lot of money, and as much as we want Elon's Elon Musk to be Tony Stark. He might be eccentric. The guy with a lot of money. He can only do so much. There's only so much you could do with the time and the money and the expertise that you got. You can't just hit light speed and hope that catches up with sci-fi and with pop culture because that's just not We're not quite there yet. We're trying in other things, but it takes money and patience and expertise. And hopefully we'll encourage another generation of scientists to become scientists. Yeah, that's what I was gonna say. Even though it is flashier than reality, but it gets people excited and it gets people supporting the reality. I mean, everybody was very excited about the Mars Rover, you remember. Yeah. Mohawk guy became and instant star and all that. Bobak. Yeah. But then, I think jury duty's fascinating too, so. [LAUGH] Yeah, I think I just get sad when reality doesn't live up to my pop culture expectations. That is a broader problem. I mean, that's, yeah, I'm in therapy for rom-coms right now. But, no, it's You know its, its it is exciting,to see this, and hopefully this will, get more generation of kids exited about astronomy and science and astrophysics and everything that summarize, whats her engineering, robotics,everything that NASA needs, am hoping that kids that are just looking wide eye at this now. Will be our Elan Musks of the future and our [UNKNOWN] of the future. And people that are really into science to make these endeavors go forward. It's just NASA's always had problems with funding and that's a main thing. I really wish we could- That's the big hurdle. That's a big hurdles money. Money money money. So I'm hoping- So it's kind of where we, I think that's where we come in. I mean this just really hits the sweet spot for me as a person who's interested in science and also interested in story telling and then obviously story telling about sciences. Is great so I'm really excited about like I can see like a whole generation of Science fiction coming out in the next decade or longer. Where like all the settings are on prox would be your own. The trap is planets and like we are going back to work in our selection a little bit. Yesterday just kinda like jokey ideas and I was, I began to like kind of. [LAUGH] Things like, so like you were saying Kessie, one thing about these planets is that they are tighterly locked and that means that tighterly as in tight as in the moon, as you know the moon is always faces its same side, does right? It doesn't rotate on its axis. And so it's the same thing with this planets. They always show. It's partially because they're so close to that sun. They always show the same side. So, it's always daylight on one side and it's always nighttime on the other side of each one of these planets, most likely. And so that, I mean, that right there, just that one little tidbit, I mean, just kind of got my mind going. I could see a franchise, a science fiction franchise, where You've got this livable side of these planets in constant daylight. The cold side is always dark. You can imagine a society there with a very intense fear of darkness as a result, having little experience with it. And I don't know, maybe one day an invaluable resource is found that exists only on the dark side and Then a civilisation must face its fear, [UNKNOWN] right now. [LAUGH] And of course all I keeping thinking about is vampire planet vampire planet. LIke I'm just thinking. Exactly. What could you do in a horror room? But if you've always lived in darkness you're never afraid of it. But what if the light is the scary part? I mean what if the creatures in the light are scarier than creatures in the dark side? Yeah. My mind went into overdrive of how many screen plays can I write in an hour based on this news. But also, I kind of want to take a look back at sci fi that's already explored the idea of settling on an earth Another Earth. Earth two was a great Sci-Fi series. Battlestar Galactica even. Their search for another planet and there's been so many great Sci-Fi shows recently that talk about terraforming and how to pioneer a new planet when you're the only humanoids, or you think you're the only humanoids on a planet. Or what to do when you are the only humans, but then the creatures on that planet aren't exactly as friendly as you hoped. There's so many different things that sci fi's already primed us for. Or like the expanse. Yeah. Expanse is kind of dead right now,and that That's basically just kind of a noir that takes place in the asteroid belt. There's not even a whole lot of alien elements in it. This I mean, the expanse actually makes more sense in this system than it does in our system. Yeah, it does. Because the planets are closer together and it actually makes more practical sense. And on some respects even Ascension, which is also a great series. Talks about how many generations will it take to just travel there and what does that mean to be on a generation of a spaceship that you're gonna die before you see the planets. But your kids will but you're on that spaceship. That was something I enjoyed about the first Expanse book. I haven't read the others yet but I'm used to you know yeah hi my name's so forth. We're used to travel being all or nothing generational ships. But the expanses in or just super easy and not an issue. The expanse is set in the middle ground where travel time does matter but it's more and tides matter and planning matters but it's on a shorter scale. Yeah. Months and- Yeah exactly. A year or two. Yeah. [BLANK_AUDIO] What do you think seasonal? [LAUGH] I never watch sci fi. I never watch the expanse. That was so super quite. That's all very excited. [LAUGH] That's suppose to be rolling on you guys. Bring it us here So I should mention there was a, we are discussing you know the notion of having to basically probably on in a multigenerational shift to ever travel to a place like this even if we have, you know rights be a type vehicle would take a while. They're actually, when this paper about these planets came out yesterday in the journal Nature, it was published alongside a actual piece of science fiction. Probably the first piece of science fiction about the Trappist system. And I definitely wrote about it on CNet yesterday. I recommend checking it out. It's by a Swiss science fiction Author named Lawrence [UNKNOWN] and that's a woman, Lawrence, Lawrence [UNKNOWN] and she writes science fiction series in French that I haven't heard of. But it's worth checking out and she described a short story that basically is from the perspective of the child of one of the first colonists of the Trappist system. It's only a couple of pages and so she's drifting around on her ship on one of these ocean worlds in the Trappist System. And apparently there is a native civilization on one of the planets and when they tried to go visit, it didn't turn out well.>> [LAUGH] .>> And it's real beautiful and it's really well written. And I can guarantee you Chuck Tingle will have an erotica novel about the planets sometime today, because he's one of the writers that does rip from the headlines, and then writes an erotica story based on whatever the headline is. Is that a career path? Yeah. He did clippy erotica that we wrote about on CNET I know, I know the name, cuz he turns up on Midnight Podcast. Yeah, yeah. He's- Yeah, he's probably got some exoplanet erotica waiting for us all to read at some point, at some time. XXXO planet. XXX, right? [LAUGH] It writes itself. Yeah, I mean, I don't know. I'm excited for what sci-fi's gonna do with this. But also, like I said, we've been [LAUGH] watching sci-fi that's been prepping us for this [LAUGH] moment for so long, that I'm sure there's a lot of sci-fi fans out there that are like, okay, here's your five rules of how not to mess up this. [LAUGH] Solar system, and how not to mess up travelling to these planets, or pissing off whatever inhabitants there may or may not be. It's kinda like every horror film, don't go down in the basement when you hear screaming. Especially when the lighting doesn't work. There's always the sci-fi rules of inhabiting new planets. So it'll be [LAUGH] interesting to see how that comes up. Again, all of this was on Twitter yesterday. It was like science makes with a science fiction it was a great data beyond Twitter for a change. To interact with your science fiction concept for today? Yeah, let's hear it. That was the. That was it? The sided of the plan that it is not, it was basically is the vampire play. Yeah, I was imagining the society were they've never been accustomed To the dark, because they're always living on the light side of one of these tightly locked planets, and then, some sort of like discovery on the dark side requires them to Got it Spend a lot of time over there, so you know they have to face their fear but then, maybe there's creatures lurking over there on the dark side That they find out that their fear was more justified than they knew. Super space horror. [LAUGH] What about you, Kelsey? Did you have any thoughts? We were talking about Twitter style, two lined sci fi [INAUDIBLE] My concept was that we send them all our Rosetta stones [INAUDIBLE] song, [INAUDIBLE] series and all that stuff, and then we finally Get there, and it turns out that they just have whole stacks of these things people keep sending them. [LAUGH] But they're monks, obviously, because they're trapists. And so they- Yeah. [LAUGH] There's a vow of silence. And they don't want any of that. And they would just ask everybody to just be quiet, and have some ail. That's great. That's a great concept. I also like the idea of It being like cannon ball run where all these different countries try to race to get there first. And also maybe different planets that we don't know about. That on the other side of the solar system that's spotted, at the same time we spotted it. And so we're all racing to these planets when have it at first or at least to see [CROSSTALK] That movie with Tom Cruise and Nicole Kidman when they're claiming different land. Yeah. Or prairie or something. Was that the Irish-accent one? Yeah, yeah, yeah. That was horrible. Same concept, Go claim your land It's like pioneer days That's right. [LAUGH] It's basically Oregon Trail in space. Yeah, that's my tagline. Don't get dysentery. Yeah. Alien dysentery is the worst. That is the worst. That is the worst. What if showed up in the alien's world actually 8 bit. [LAUGH] Was just a movie. I'm hoping, I still hoping for Ted Button style aliens like I would like a Mars attack type aliens that they all look at us and just disintegrate us as soon as we touch down I mean that would be Probably the most hilarious thing ever. And then we just play music and blow up all their [UNKNOWN] and kill them? Yeah, yodeling and country music. [LAUGH] Country music kills all aliens. That's another rule we should remember. No, it would be great if, instead of these advanced creatures that we're hoping for, [LAUGH] and they just turned out to be Sci-fi B movie Pullman type aliens. It would be so great if that happened just to verify that B movies are worth watching. [LAUGH] If we're going to be wishing, I'd ask for the galaxy quest one. Yeah, yeah. Yeah. They're so cute. I just watched that again recently. It's still good. It's still blows up. What if they're all a bunch of [INAUDIBLE] and we'll never understand what they're saying ever, ever. That's the other thing too, is if there are humanoids or aliens with the capability of language That's going to be a very interesting trend to figure out. I think Arrival is a good primer. I forgot Tom- Everybody is going to be in space movie. What's his name?. Fox. Everybody. Everybody. It's a great movie. It really is. Nicholson is really great. I have never seen that. He's the president. You've never seen it, you got to watch it. No. You should. And honestly, Nicholson as president isn't such a far off thing, when you think about nowadays. [LAUGH] Maybe we should close with the The question that my wife always asks me whenever there's always some new story like this, which is would you ever go. And I always say no. I have no interest in going to space and moving to Mars. Wait, wait, wait. Let's back up here. Your wife always asks You have issue thinking? He's first thought is always. Are you gonna go? I agree with you. I don't wanna be the sacrificial lamb. I'd rather if there was a way to like put me in stacies and then I could come out of that and then once air travel is figured out. Sembreak, I came from United, so, I may I need a spasm what would be like to visit up to another place and you may not even survive the trip and you there a go anywhere, because the trip so long like, I would wanna wait somehow, somewhere, precise preserve me then I will go, when it safe well everyone's doing that So once the resort opens? Yeah. Once Disneyland whatever opens. No, maybe not Disneyland. I don't wanna go there. Universal Studios has something. No, I mean, a lot of people feel that way about a new scientific endeavor. They don't necessarily wanna be The beta testers, cuz who knows. We came to get hoverboards to stop exploding. I don't know if I wanna but I would love to be down here Blade Runner style like Deckard and take over really cheap real estate while all of you are on a different planet. I kind of feel like that would be kind of awesome. You can do that now in New Mexico. [LAUGH] I know. I'll be there soon. What do you think Kelsie, what would it take to get you to travel or Mars or the moon. What creature comforts would you need? An excellent VR set up in my living room, basically. There we go. That's my plan. I mean if we had transporter technology. Though that necessarily doesn't always work well on StarTrek. But if there was a way to not have to stand in a long customs line. If I had to take a ton of luggage, if there was a way to hop planets. I don't know, It would be interesting. But again. You'd have to get all the kinks worked out first. I don't wanna be the Enterprise dog. I don't wanna be the beagle that Scotty disintegrates. I don't [LAUGH] necessarily wanna go to a planet before all the scary aliens are taken off of it. I don't need to be in a mining colony or a pioneer. I'm okay with other people pioneering and then me just showing up later. [LAUGH] With my tourist The camera. That's what I wanna be, is the tourist. [LAUGH] All right fair enough. What about you, Steven? Any plans to take the kids to Mars anytime soon? [LAUGH] No, no way. I'm staying on planet Earth. I like sunny weather. I like good climate. But I did write a haiku. I guess we're all doing your line, your Your sci-fi stuff. So poetic. Awesome. I wrote a haiku based on Proxima One, or Trapist One, sorry, and it's very simple. Woke up and it's night. How I long for daylight. Leave Trapist I might. [LAUGH] I think we should snap clap. A Yoda Haiku. It was kind of Yoda-ish. A beatnik snap. Very good. I'm a little disappointed there was no dirty limerick writing, but that's alright. [LAUGH] The last line was the hardest. Okay, yeah. [LAUGH] I guess my final thought, if I have one, is I keep going over this idea in my head that there's this This system seems like kind of so much more activity going on, just because you have like more Earth-like planets than we have and they're close together, and blah blah blah. And I'm just a little bit worried, I wonder if humanity is at this point where we're discovering that, like, we've been living in a tiny like rural town in Kansas our entire lives and like somebody just sent us the very first postcard from New York City and we've never seen what A city like New York City looks like, I'm a little worried we're in that moment where [LAUGH] We're on this planet in the middle of nowhere that just somehow got stuck in the corner of the Milky Way by itself, no other visible planets around it, and we're just like in the boonies of the universe and we're just now beginning to come to terms with it. So basically we're in tattoine Everyone- Yes! Put it in Star Wars lingo. And we have never seen all this great stuff that's going on, and we're the rednecks of the universe. I think we probably already knew that. [LAUGH] [LAUGH] But yeah that's what I've been for all of the last 48 hours. Well hopefully one of the popular kids from another planet will clue us in and take us under their wing. Well there's a troll in our chat room right now. Who says he knows a lot. He says we are in a closed system. Apparently. This is a joke, he says. Earth is in a closed system, which you can now leave. Even Bill Nye admits that. [LAUGH] Even Bill Nye. Bill Nye, trolling the trolls. It's always there's some trolls bring up Bill Nye. I know, yeah. How do you use Bill Nye as your argument. Well we'll find out soon enough how close the system or how rural we are, I'm sure but- We got satellites that went pretty far man.. I mean universe is big. The universe is, and that's an understatement. That's an under [LAUGH] [LAUGH] so who knows what's out there? I'm just glad that we're finally seeing some stuff that gets people excited about. NASA and science and. Maybe that'll light a fire under Elon Musk and we'll get some more out of him as well. Yeah. I think- Not that he's not trying. I mean. Yeah, I don't. [LAUGH] I think that fire. I mean, SpaceX they are trying, so. There's a nuclear reactor under that guy's ****, so. I'd rather it be under his **** than other He's hanging out with Trump right now. Saying we've got to get to Mars, you don't understand. Yeah, that's another discussion. [LAUGH]. Trump might actually be the worst thing for NASA. I don't know maybe he's not. I mean maybe he's a sci fi fan, I don't know. He's kind of a space guy. He want's to be a guy who makes big. Plans like that. Here's the thing. When you want your name on buildings, it's not a far stretch to have your name on a planet. [LAUGH] True. Travis isn't far off. Trumpus. [LAUGH] Maybe this is what gets them excited about space travel. I'm all for it. If he puts money behind it instead of the wall, maybe we get a planet gonna get a nice gold planet Yeah, I'm okay with that. I'm okay with that. As long as we have some science funding that's going toward this on a regular basis and consistent, I'm totally fine with that. All right, you heard it here first. Gold planet. On that note of bipartisan agreement [LAUGH] I think that's probably it for far sided for this month. Hope you enjoyed it and always check out all the stuff we've been talking about on Cnet.com. You can find all kinds of videos, galleries, everything about the Trapis-1 planets and about the Sci fi That we are talking about. And, of course, back episodes of Farsighted. Check it out, CNET.com. And thanks again for watching from Earth, New Mexico. I'm Erick Mack. For Kelsey Adams, Bonnie Burden, and Steven Beecham, we miss you Jeff Sparklin, and we'll see you guys next time. Thanks.

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