Stop, point, and shoot
29:15

Stop, point, and shoot

Photography
[ Music ] ^M00:00:06 >> And it is time for another episode of Editors' Office Hours NYC edition. I'm Dan Ackerman here on a rainy Tuesday here in the Big Apple, joining me, very exciting, is our good buddy Josh Goldman. Josh, what are we gonna be talking about today? >> We're gonna be talking about camera's Dan, lots and lots of point and shoot cameras. None of that fancy-- >> None of that fancy SLR stuff. >> Yeah, none of that 'cause I'm really much too simple for that. >> These are those actual cameras people can afford these days because of our financial meltdown you can still get a good point and shoot. >> Yeah. >> Okay, now there are a couple of different ways to participate in our show because this show is all about audience participation. We've got a chat box right below the screen if you're watching us live. You can type in there and chat with other people watching the show and there's a big white box right next to Josh's head on that side of the screen. If you have a question, just type it in there, we will get the question, I will answer it, I will make Josh answer it. You do need to be a CNET member to ask a question but if you're not, it's easy, you can just register right in the box. All you need is an email address and a password. Hint, don't make a password, okay. So let's jump right in there, we're gonna get to as many question as we can. First one is actually pretty basic. We've heard a lot about the megapixel wars for a long time, somebody wants to know do more megapixel still mean better pictures, is that's still the main number we should be looking for? >> No, probably not. Actually I mean, the megapixels continue to go up this year. There were a lot of 14.7 megapixels cameras. >> In point and shoot cameras. >> In point and shoot cameras. >> I think last time we bought a camera like 4 or 5. It was like a big number. >> Yeah, when was the last time you-- >> That was a long time. >> Yeah, [simultaneous talking]. Anyway probably the most you should go for right now, 10 megapixels because that's the most common right now. Shows up in a lot of the point and shoot cameras, pretty much all the resolution you'll ever need for a point and shoot camera. >> What's the price range for these 10 megapixel cameras? How low do they go? >> They go pretty low but just because-- >> Just because the cheapest one on the shelf doesn't mean--200 dollars? >> Yeah, 200 dollars is a good price for it. Just because it's 10 megapixels doesn't mean it's gonna be-- >> It's not 10 good megapixels. >> Right, right, exactly. >> Like how much do I need in order to print out a nice like 5 by 7, or even 8 by 10, you know, decent shot in like photo paper in my printer? >> Well, I mean years ago, I mean my first digital camera is only 3 megapixels. And it did fine snapshots but that was then, this is now and cameras are much smaller and larger sensors on them. >> So bigger pictures for everybody for less money. >> Yeah. >> It's one of the few things that's actually getting better. >> Okay, sure, I--hey! >> We've got a question, I was gonna buy, not me personally but whoever is asking. I was gonna buy one of those ultra zoom cameras. Now what is an ultra zoom camera? >> Ultra zoom camera pretty much is a point and shoot camera. It's got sort of a digital SLR body to it but it's a little more compact and lens is fixed. >> So you can take the lens off and put in the lens on like in an SLR. >> But it goes from pretty wide to pretty long, so you can, it's usually somewhere between 12 times zoom all the way up to 20 times zoom. >> And it's optical zoom too. >> Yeah. >> Not digital. >> No, that's optical zoom. And actually our coworker here, Lorry, refers to them as stalker zooms because they really kinda-- >> You can sit across the street in a parked car waiting for your object of affection to go home. >> I mean they're great for shooting wildlife or capturing because you don't wanna get too close to squirrels. >> Or for stalking? >> Or for stalking animals. >> Like an entry level digital SLR about 800 to a 1000 usually? >> Yeah. >> That sounds great so what about these ultra zooms, what kind of price range are those in? >> These go like I have this Fujifilm FinePix S2000HD. >> Now it's look almost like a digital SLR because it's got the big lens there and it's got the flash that pops up but it's not. >> No, no that lens doesn't come off. It's a 15 times zoom. >> Okay. Does it have turning focus? >> No, no, it's on auto focus but you can do it manually. >> Can I get one with a--I always love to focus right. I'm gonna go SLR for that? >> Yeah, yeah, sorry. But what you do get from--oh this goes for I think around 400 dollars and you get--it's a 10 megapixel camera and like I said very popular. And it takes some great pictures, you get a view finder, big screen. >> So it's about halfway between the point and shoot and the SLR's, they call them ultra zooms. >> Yap. >> Okay, okay, back to our original ultra zoom question. Am I better off getting a cheap digital SLR or should I go for an ultra zoom? >> It really all depends. The ultra zooms have a lot of really good point and shoot features. So if you're moving up from another point and shoot camera that might be the best way to go to ultra zoom. But then again, if you think you might wanna really experiment with your photography and get into the nitty-gritty of settings and everything. Although, these do manual and shutter priority and aperture priority, all the things that the SLR's traditionally do. But again the lens is fixed, so you don't have to worry about carrying a bunch of lenses around with you all the time, a nice zoom lens all the time. >> Alright, so that's middle ground between the super cheap stuff and the super expensive stuff. >> Yeah. >> You've mention shutter, I have a shutter question for you. >> Okay. >> I'm a teacher and I take lots of photos throughout the year of my class. I've had a Canon SD800, now what is a Canon SD800? >> It's one of their Digital ELPH compact cameras. >> Okay, so the point and shoot. The shutter is too slow for me, any suggestion? So you can't change the shutter speeds on those little cameras. Or maybe they have a low light or high sensitivity mode or something like that, not enough for you. >> Yeah right. The shutter is too slow on that one? That actually is one of the faster, it's an older camera but it was still one of the faster point and shoot cameras out there as far as shutter speed goes. So, you're really not gonna get too much better than that. There's a couple of Casio's out there that also shoot pretty fast, but other than that the only way to get faster than that is to move up to a digital SLR. >> Okay, okay, so they've got to trade up to the big boys. >> Yeah, and if you want a pocket camera unfortunately-- >> You don't have to deal with a less flexibility in your shutter speed. Alright, now here's a camera I'd see a couple of questions about so I'll just ask you one of them. Smurf286 wants to know, what do you think about the Canon PowerShot G10, and that's a name I'd seen thrown around a couple of times. So what is the G10 and what do you think of it? >> G10, it sort of boarders on the ultra zoom. It's got a lot of the digital SLR features in it but it's a compact camera. You'll see a lot of the tourists, especially popular with the European tourists around New York City. They go over to the B and H over and pick up a Canon G10. >> Definitely some place people who come to visit New York should check out if they are interested in photography. And if they want to buy anything or just seeing the whole operation. >> Well, yeah. >> Though they have to step on the conveyor belt. >> Yeah, it's a pretty amazing place especially if you're any sort of a camera buff, it's definitely a site to see. But it's just a very popular camera, so far looks pretty good. Again it has a lot of the point and shoot stuff in it that the smaller PowerShots have in it but also has a lot of manual features in it. >> Okay, okay and what do those run? Roughly? >> I think around 4 or 500 dollars. >> Okay, so about the same as an ultra zoom. >> Yap. >> Alright, is there a brand of camera, JBox wants to know, that would have a very quick response time, SLR's are very quick. Is there anything that would be as fast in a point and shoot? So I assume they mean when you press the button and the picture gets taken. >> What was it? >> Is there a brand of camera that has a very quick response time like an SLR but in a point and shoot format? It's gonna get in there, boom, picture right away. Obviously the thing where I press the trigger halfway and let it do all. It's auto focusing like that. >> Yeah that's how most people I suppose [simultaneous talking], yeah. >> So what kind of point and shoots are great for really good response time? You know you always miss that moment, you always get it right after the, you know, the cat fell off the table. >> Right, again that's a problem with point and shoot. They're just not gonna be fast like a digital SLR. >> To get the boom, boom, boom you've got to move up to the digital SLR. >> Yeah but you can, I mean there are plenty of cameras in the market that have good continuous shooting features. They're still not gonna be-- >> And that's where you take the whole bunch of pictures in a row then you go and pick out the ones you want. >> Yeah, usually it's anywhere from like the more budgety cameras have a 3-shot continuous shoot. But other ones like I've just got done testing the Canon SD880IS and I believe it has an unlimited continuous shoot. You can just keep shooting until the card fills up. >> Okay, okay. >> And so. >> Tom wants to know as to talking about Ultra Zoom which is a surprisingly popular topic, I didn't really know about them, do they have bigger sensors I assume means than point-and-shoot cameras or are the electronics designed larger than the same, I mean it's basically, you know, the lens [inaudible]. >> Yeah, they're marginally the same. I mean that they do sometime. I mean that you can't just say, "Oh, it has a larger sensor, I mean a larger sensor than other point-and-shoots." And, yeah it's gonna have a larger sensor. There's more room in there to have more, you know, more space for a larger sensor but -- >> [Inaudible] is largely in the body and the lens of the -- >> Yeah. >> Okay, okay. Now, you got a couple of cameras here with you, a couple of point-and-shoots. Some of them have some pretty cool features. You want to show me a couple of these? >> Sure, let's see. We've got the -- it's the new Nikon S60. >> Okay. >> It's awfully pretty, you know. >> It is. It is. >> Yeah. It's nice and shiny. Yeah, it looks like a car. >> Yeah. Alright, and what special that this got? >> It is completely other than the shot hole button -- >> Oh, look at that, okay. Nice doing you say, no buttons. >> And they all -- It is completely touchscreen. Yeah. >> Alright. It's almost like an iPhone over that. >> Yeah. It's pretty much is and even the -- you can see the zoom -- the zoom there. >> Alright. >> This is even touchscreen. So, you can't really. >> Tell the photo. Look at that. Zooming in, zooming out. That's pretty cool. But how does it work? I feel like that would be annoying, you know, when you're actually out trying to get a picture and trying to touch with the right, you know, you have to look at it, if you're right, if you're touching the right spot. >> Right, the zoom is a little -- >> A little tricky? >> Yeah. The zoom is a little tricky but everything else -- >> Everything else works well. >> Yeah, works really well. >> Okay. Okay. >> Surprisingly the touchscreen and the interface are really good. >> Yeah, look at that, okay. >> So no problems navigating, really nicely. The other concern is once you go all touchscreen, all screen with something like that. >> Right. >> You kinda have to look at the screen in order to take your pictures. >> Yes. Alright. Yeah. >> Yeah, there's really no way around it. So it has to stay bright. >> Oh, okay. And wouldn't that eat up your battery? >> Well no, I mean it does, it actually does pretty well in bright sunlight. >> Okay. Good. >> I guess, surprisingly. >> Oh, you could still see it. >> Yeah. You can still see it. >> It's got a 5x optical zoom. >> Hmm >> Nikon COOLPIX -- what's the model of it? >> S60. >> S60, what do these run? >> I think that's about 300 or 400. >> Okay. Nice, nice, nice. >> I can be wrong on that, though. And then we also have the -- this is the Samsung TL34 HD. >> Okay. >> It -- touchscreens are very popular. >>Yeah. >> It seems this year. So this one also has a nice -- >> With a really big touchscreen. >> Big touchscreen. >> With some buttons on it. >> It does have buttons on it. Playback and Menu, you know, you access all of that stuff. >> And zoom. >> And zoom. >> Do you feel like _ 0:12:56.2 zoom to be a physical button. >> Yeah, yeah. That was kinda -- that was kinda my impression with the Nikon was that I kinda wanted the zoom to be an actual button. But, you know, there's something to be said for that big -- >> Yeah, big clean display. >> Yup. >> Right. >> And, you know, the -- other that the touch screen interface with it, it shoots HD video. >> Ahh, okay. >> Haven't had a chance to look at the video quality yet but, you know. >> But 720p video. >> It is. It is. And then there is -- it's also a 14.7 megapixel like I said. >> Okay, and you can put Johnny [phonetic] SD cards. >> Yup. >> Okay. >> Into this little -- >> Nice! >> Little camera. >> And how much do these guys run? >> You know I don't know the price on that. >> Okay, okay. But with the [inaudible] video. >> I would assume -- >> Down the same -- >> Around 300. Yeah. >> Alright. >> Therefore it's used as a mighty video, that's a pretty cheap way to do it. >> Yup. >> Nice, nice, nice. And one more that had another unique kind of control scheme. >> Right, right. So, Olympus is pretty, as far as the point-and-shoot go, they're really known for their shock proof and water proof cameras. >> Okay. >> And this is the Stylus 1050 SW. And because touchscreens would be kinda useless in if you got gloves on. >> Oh, yeah, okay. >> They went with a -- they went a different way and did a tap. >> A tap? >> A tap? >> Yeah. >> Okay. So this is touch-sensitive sensors on either side of the camera. >> Right. >> You actually scroll to the Menus -- >> Yup. >> Like that. >> Hmm. >> And then how do I indicate yes? Then you press the button on the middle? >> Press Okay. Yeah. >> Right. >> And then -- >> That's your feeding. >> If you want a playback, you know. >> Okay. And then you can scroll to the pictures by length tap left, tap right. >> Yup. So -- >> And now, even if you have big gloves up. >> Yup. Nice, nice, nice. >> So. >> So bunch of different unique ways for people to get through their camera Menus now rather than just like a little deep head -- >> Right. >> And the little wheel everybody used to have. >> Right. >> Well, that is very cool. I'll tell you what? Let us take a break right now and take a look at a first look video for one of these cameras. What video are we gonna be looking at? >> It's a Ultra Zoom actually, it's the Sony H50. >> Okay, we're gonna take a look at the video for the Sony H50. We're gonna give Josh a kiss to muffed off. And we will be back, take more of your questions in just a couple of minutes. ^M00:15:14 [ Pause ] ^M00:15:21 >> Okay well, I guess I want to watch that video some other time but -- [ Simultaneous Talking ] >> It was. It's -- >> What would you acted out like you're doing it here. >> It's a -- it is actually a very good camera. >> We didn't have the chance to get your talent either. >> Yeah, I know. It is a light thing. Say it is. >> We're like a [inaudible]. >> So I call this the CNET sensory deprivation chamber. >> Yeah. >> A tiny -- a tiny black-walled room with lot of lights. >> It's a good name for it. >> What's -- >> I feel like I'm being -- >> Interrogated? >> Interrogated, yeah, yeah. >> That's right. Let's [stuttering] jump back into a couple of more questions, and we'll see if we can get that video cued up. Packgamer wants to know, "Do you think we will ever see the number of point-and-shoot cameras decline as more and more people go towards SLR. So more SLRs, fewer point-and-shoots. Are we eventually gonna lose this low end of the market? >> I doubt it. Only because there is something that that's just great about being able to slip -- >> A tiny little thin camera in your pocket. >> In pocket. I mean I keep mine in a pouch. It's from a company called _ 0:16:21. It's just a -- it's just a little pouch. And I keep on -- on my strap. >> Okay, in case the baby does something cute. >> On my bag. Baby -- baby or -- >> Anybody else. >> Wildlife or -- >> Wildlife. >> Or anything, flowers. >> Bloomfield New Jersey Wild Life. >> Bloomfield New Jersey Wild Life >> Okay. So, you think you -- the point is it will keep kind in the low end of the market and the instant, you know, gratification end. >> Yeah. I mean there's nothing subtle about within a digital SLR out when you're out at a club. >> That's true, that's true. >> Or drinking in a bar. I guess I -- >> They don't travel up planes very well sometimes. >> It's true. They're, you know, the big and bulky cameras. >> Yes, yes. >> So, you definitely -- I mean I don't think you'll see less. They are however running out of features, I think. >> Oh, we got the tapping on the side now. >> Yeah. >> Well, they're all right out of features. >> Well, no. I mean you've got things like -- everybody is doing smile, yeah. Everybody has got to smile and shout. >> And shot it, I have smile detection, I tried one of those out. >> Like even like Sony has taken, I actually really like their smile sensor because it most of them wait to detect a smile. >> Yes. >> And then you take the picture. >> Sony can kinda detect when there's a good vibe in the room and get ready for it. >> Well the Sony one, you can take -- if you hit the -- there's a little smile picture on the back of the LCD and they are also touchscreen. >> Hmm. >> So you'll like hit the smile thing and then every time it sees a-- [ Simultaneous Talking ] >> So, it automatically takes the picture. >> It automatically takes the picture. >> Yeah, I've seen that, I've seen that. >> So -- and it will keep on doing it as long as the smile sensors is activated whereas other cameras you have to keep hitting it. >> Okay, okay. >> So, it's a -- >> Here's a good practical question and I do get this one all the time from people. I only take pictures without a flash but 9 times out of 10, they come up blurry. What point is like that's best for someone with the shakes? >> Well, you definitely want to look for something with an optical image stabilization. >> Ahh okay. >> You can -- >> A lot of times the flashes on this point-and-shoots are not very subtle, you know, they just blur out the -- >> Right. Well, they are just made to -- >> By the real. >> Well, not even light up the room. >> Light up to 5 feet. >> Right. And also -- >> Right. The pictures will look a lot better without the flash but then you can't just focus on it and you don't have a manual focus. >> Right, right the darker it is than were soft lights. So, there are a lot of cameras that, much like the megapixel waters [phonetic], there is the ISL waters. >> Ahh, okay. >> Where it's just everybody was like, "Oh, I can do 3200, or I'll do 6400", and it was going up and up and the problem is is that after a certain level, there is so much noise. >> Yes. >> In the image that you can't really use it even if you say. I mean there is something be said for having a picture when you couldn't have any picture at all. But, you know, it's always of limited use. >> Okay. >> So, best thing to do is look for optical image stabilization. >> And they will help with the unfocused blurry -- >> Yeah. 'Cause it will keep you -- >> Oh, okay. >> Keep you from shaking. And the more you shake -- >> The worst it is. >> Yeah, 'cause the shutter needs to be steady. >> Now, I remember when they first started putting image stabilization to the cameras, people said, "Oh, don't use it because it cuts down on the image quality." It eats up some of that information, is that still the case? >> That's for the electronic image stabilization. >> Oh the optical is- >> Not within the lens itself. >> Yeah. That was the -- >> Okay. >> That was sensor shift, usually they move the sensors so they. >> So not really an issue for most people anymore like burn on TV. >> Well, yeah. >> It used to be big issue now. It's okay. >> Well, there's a lot of people that's -- there are companies that -- that say oh we have dual that makes stabilization which means they have both the electronic and the optical. >> Okay. >> And then there's also just the electronic which is usually found on the less expensive budget cameras. But in general the best way to go in low light is if you can't get more light make sure you put the camera down on something pretty stable. >> Right or rest your elbows on the table. >> Right, right. That's the thing with the, you know, with them doing away. They need this, you know, big screens now. >> Right. >> They've done away with most of the optical view finders-- >> Yes, yes. >>--on this point and shoot cameras. >> You got it. The only way you can see is through the display. >> Right. So I mean when I was--while I was taking photo journals in class, you know you talk to keep your arms in tight. You can't really do that. >> And now it only takes pictures like this. >> Yeah, which is a bad way to take pictures. >> You can down with your elbows against your body. >> Yeah. >> Now, here's the question I don't quite get maybe you'll help explain this one to me. How do you feel about an external zoom versus an internal zoom? Does that mean optical versus a digital zoom? >> No, like say-- >> Oh I--okay, now I know it. Now I get it. >> This one, the zoom lens is actually internal. >> Inside. >> Yeah. >> So you don't have the thing come out like that. >> Right, right. >> Well a lot of other cameras that comes out. >> Right, right. Like this one you're talking-- >> Yeah, like that or the other one we looked at. >> Right, right. >> Okay. So what are pros and cons? >> Well, the pro is you don't have a lens sticking out in the front of this one. >> Yes, yes. >> You know I don't really--I must say I've never seen a difference in image quality-- >> Image quality, oh okay. >>--on point and shoot cameras with, you know-- >> The internal versus the external. >> Yeah. You know I'm sure there are but again that also has to do with other components. I mean the quality of the lens in general. >> Not a deal breaker either way? >> Right, right. >> What kind of optical zooms should I be looking for at a minimum if I'm buying a camera, 5X, 10X? There used to be like 2X. It was like, you know, average but that was a long time ago. >> Personally, I would go 5X but, you know, common is 3X. >> Okay. How high the point and shoots get? >> You know, I mean-- >> Roughly. [Simultaneous talking] >> Well, I mean if you're talking this-- >> Well, on those you can get up to 10, right? >> Yeah. Well, you know you can go up to 20. >> 20, okay. >> And there is an, I think higher actually now but-- >> Well, let's look at the pocket. Five is about-- >> For the most part 5X, 8X. >> Okay, okay. >> That's about the limit, 8X I think is the most I've seen. I don't even know if that's correct but-- >> So with the holidays coming up and the world in the midst of an economic meltdown. What are some good stockings stuff or gifts for the point and shoot photographer in your life? You got any suggestions for us? >> Well SD cards and well memory cards in general are always nice though-- >> Now, does it matter--when we talked to Lory about SLR cameras, we're talking about the different kinds of cards like the type 1 and type 2 or whatever and how that makes a difference on the high end, on the low end for the point and shoots. Is that really important? >> It kind of--yeah, it still is. >> Is still is, okay. >> Yeah. You don't wanna go with a card that's a class, you know, class 4, class 6, though class 6 would be the fastest right now. >> So as the class goes up the card gets fast. >> Right. And so class 4 is probably the best right now you wanna do 'cause I mean-- >> When I go to the Best Buy or some place I just get the cheapy generic brand. It doesn't even say what is that usually. >> Yeah. Well-- >> Is that usually a class 1, 2? >> You know I don't know it all depends on that. They're just--it's probably not very addressed. >> Okay and that's how it's fast literally, it writes the image to the card and then you're ready to take your next picture. >> Yeah. So-- >> 'Cause sometimes it takes a while but that probably could have slow card. >> Right. Well, you know, and also the camera has to be able to take advantage of the speed. If the camera can't take advantage of the speed, you're wasting money on that. >> On the faster card. >> So-- >> How big are SD cards usually now that most people use? Like what's the preferred size? I remember it used to be like a gig or 2 gigs, so it's like considered big about 2 years ago? What's the average now? >> Well if you have a newer camera and it accepts SDHC, you can go up to 16 or 32 gigs now. >> Okay. >> But for the most part I think 4 gigs is--if you've got an SDHC, I like 4 gigs. >> Now what does SDHC stand for? >> Secure digital high capacity. >> High capacity. They look the same as SD cards. >> Right. >> They play back in the same readers. >> Well no. You have to have an SDHC reader. >> Oh, okay. >> So like-- >> Well, look at that. >> This one I have here. >> Okay. What do we got here? >> It's a Belkin universal card reader. >> It's got a lot of different slots. >> Right. >> A compact flash, okay. >> Right. >> The Smart Media, Sony memory stick. >> Fifty six types of media cards. >> Micro SD, regular SD. Okay and it got, well USB, put it right there so you can just put it on your desktop or your-- >> Yeah. And when you're not using it you just stand it up on its side. >> Stand up on its side. >> Yeah. >> No dust gets inside. >> Yeah. >> This sounds like a good stocking stuff. What do these guys run? >> You know I think it's 20, 30 dollars. >> Yeah, that sounds a good recession gift for the multi-format photographer in your life. >> I don't know it's great especially if you're--I mean my house has 3 different digital cameras now. >> You just guessed my next question or our audience's next question which is how many cameras do you own and what are they? >> I have a Nikon D60. I also have-- >> Okay. And what is that? >> It's a digital SLR. >> Okay. >> It's a stepup from the older Nikon D40X but not too much of a stepup but it is a nice beginner. >> SLR. >> Beginner SLR. >> Okay. >> And I also have a Pentax Option A20. It's an older pocket point and shoot camera. I got it because it is very easy to operate. >> Okay. >> And I wanted to have and it's also very small. So I wanted to have something lying around that I could keep in my pocket at all times and give to any [simultaneous talking] >> This is a photographic emergency. >> Right, right, exactly which is all the time. >> And number 3? >> Number 3 is a Kodak. I can't remember the model number. >> Okay, so like a point and shoot? >> It is. >> Okay. >> It's another point and shoot. Also a very easy camera and great. The last one I can't remember. >> That is your camera line up. >> Yeah. >> Okay. We just got a minute left. I'm gonna throw a question out to you that I know a lot of people are thinking about is with the new MacBooks that just came out. They still can't put an SD card slot on these things. How much of a mediocre is that? >> I was thinking about that this morning. I mean you can even--there's--you can make the argument that professionals are using the MacBook Pros would not want an SD card slot. >> What would they want? >> They'd want a CF card slot. >> Yeah. >> Well then why is there, you know, a CF card? >> That's true. >> You know-- >> But even on the regular 13-inch which is such a casual laptop that so many people use, especially photographers. They have all that photo software built in. >> And you would notice how many USB ports are on. >> I think 3 on the current one. >> Yes. So you would lose-- >> Make one on SD card. >> You can make one on SD card. >> Well, they keep saying, oh you can get an external one and plug it in. >> I don't want an external one. >> There is no express card slot on the 13-inch. On the Pro there's an express card slot so I guess you can put a card reader in there but then where am I gonna put my mobile broadband modem? >> Yeah. There you go. There you go. There is no--I mean there's just--there's no reason for it. >> It's surprising that Apple is not taking care of its photography fan users. >> It's been a long time since Windows users have had SD card slots built into their--I mean it's been years now. >> Yeah. Every laptop has it. Even the little tiny NetBooks, before 500 dollar NetBooks all have SD card slots. >> There you go and you're talking about free and you know using up a USB port on the mother board. >> Josh, it is a 3 p.m. Eastern Time. I cannot believe the entire half hour has just sped by even with our lack of a little video break. You can join us here tomorrow for another edition of Editors' Office Hours from San Francisco where Jessica Dolcourt will be talking about Google Android Apps and you. I'm Dan Ackerman for Josh Goldman. You can of course catch me every week on the Digital City podcast. Did you know that, digitalcity.cnet.com? >> I did not. >> Where we talk about all kinds of urban technologies. It's a lot of fun. You should check it out. But until then, you can certainly come on anytime you like. We're gonna get Josh a towel so we could mop his brow, cheeks, nose and other facial products and we'll see you next time on Office Hours. ^M00:29:08 [ Music ]

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