Interview: Bridget Karlin talks Intel's Internet of Things on Tomorrow Daily
12:17

Interview: Bridget Karlin talks Intel's Internet of Things on Tomorrow Daily

Culture
[MUSIC] Welcome back to the show friends, our guest today, a very special guest, she is the managing director of Internet of Things group at Intel, which means she might have the answer to the question, should everything be smart? We're very excited to welcome Bridget Karlin here. Thank you for being with us, Bridget. Thank you for having me. It's a pleasure. Yeah, we're so excited to talk about the internet of things. Because this is sort of a broad kind of category. And a lot of people don't really even maybe know what specifically the internet of things is. Maybe we should start there. What is IOT, as we love to call it. So the internet of things is essentially taking everyday objects And connect them to the internet and so that they can collect and share and analyze data so that we can extract more meaningful information, so in a nut shell, it's taking things like your phones, appliances, your cars and connecting them to the internet so that we can get the data off of them and then understand a little bit more about what's happening with the device. So that will, what's the end goal then? The idea being that our houses, our things, our appliances will all better able to serve us, right? Right, and so the purpose of connecting these devices and getting data off of them is so that we can understand a little bit more about the environment, the conditions around you. These are translating into new types of experiences, new types of business models, and for many of us better efficiencies with businesses, with our resources and being able to sustain our environment. So let's talk a little bit about smart objects cuz every year at CES we see Amazing things at the Intel booth. It's one of our favorite. And a lot of silly things all over the place. Yeah, for sure. So we've seen spider dresses, we've seen interactive baby 1Zs, we've seen laptops with Intel chips and that Yeah. we see a lot of different parts obviously Intel does a lot of different things so We don't expect you to know every single processor Intel ever put a chip into, but, in terms of sort of trends that we've been seeing in internet things, what do you think are the most popular? Innovative products, or sort of ideas Is that we've really kind of seen bloom in the last six months or so and going forward. Great question. Well I think we're in a very exciting time. We're in an era of computing where customers are choosing experience over product features and functions. And what we're witnessing are three basic trends. The first one is that we're becoming a smart and connected world. So all the chips we're embedding into things are helping us. Make the device itself smart and then connecting it, so that's the first thing we are seeing. The second thing we are experiencing is that the computers are gaining senses, we call this the sensification of computing, where we used to see in two D we now get to see in three D, we can detect Temperature and motion and things like that, so that we're gaining more senses from our devices. And then the third thing is that the computers are now becoming an extension of you- Sure. So we know how we take our smartphones everywhere we go, Now we have our smart watches. And we're seeing that more and more in devices where we're now becoming more seamlessly integrated with our technology. And you mentioned CES, it's a terrific show, a lot of really cool technology. Technologies. It's a great showcase. But you see things like for sports, we now see what started with smart glasses. We have a partner called Oakley. They're a Luxottica smart eyewear brand. And they've integrated voice and storage and processing into glasses. So that as you're a runner and you've got your sun glasses on, it can start giving you voice activated coaching. And it's one of the things that start to incorporate new experiences that we didn't originally expect out of our glasses. Right. So new kinds of things like that. Yeah and- Keep reading, keep reading. [LAUGH] [CROSSTALK] Don't run too fast, you might break your ankle. That would be me. They'd be like, don't run too fast Ashley, you're gonna hurt yourself. So in terms of one of the things that I have sort of noticed is Cars integrating with [UNKNOWN] so as you're driving home you kind of let your car go hey I'm on my way home. Now it just sort of knows you're on your way home. And it says I should probably bring down the thermostat a couple degrees and Get out, I feel like now we are sort of training our cars to be our dogs where they bring you the paper and your slippers. Yeah, I'm ready for that. And you get home and it's all very nice and cozy and stuff. So do you think that when you are Sort of managing the strategy of Internet of Things Group at Intel. What are the types of questions you sort of ask yourself in terms of is this something that Intel wants to get into? Mm-hm. How do you kind of make those decisions, cuz obviously, as we've mentioned, Intel does a lot of things. And so how do you say this also Is within Intel's vision, but is pushing the envelope in terms of what can be done? Yeah great question. I mean when you're thinking about strategy, and what markets you should go into, what technologies are appropriate for that market, you first start with the customer. You start with, you know what Problems can we solve? What experiences can we make possible? And that really in a nutshell is how we start approaching innovation and that sort of thing. And I would say that for the Internet of Things we look at the IOT in sort of two basic segments. One segment being consumer where you've got things like your smart watch and different types of wearables. And in fact that's a really exciting area for us because analysts are telling us that we're going to have about 780 million wearables by 2018. Wow. So it's happening. I don't know [CROSSTALK] [LAUGH] Just bracelets all the way down. Things you've never even thought of. And then the second sort of bucket is sort of the industrial side, and that by far and away when we think about the total economic opportunity for IOT which is about 4 to $11 trillion globally. About 70% of that is coming from the industrial side. Sure. Really? So when you think about the industrial side, what does that mean? Well, it's transportation, it's retail, it's healthcare, Right. it's smart building. I was gonna say you guys even had at [UNKNOWN] with you a smart hard-hat. Yeah. Yes. This is really cool. That is so cool. That is where the part Partner called Daiquiri and they took, essentially, our Intel RealSense technology, which enables 3D and that sort of thing, plus our processors. And they took what used to be the old hard hat and they made it smart by putting in these technologies And they created an augmented reality situation. So when you have an industrial worker out on the oil rig repairing something, and if he's up there and they say, hey this part needs to be replaced as well, they can In real time send him the schematics so that he can literally see through augmented reality a 3D, the schematics that he should work on and exactly where to go fix the part. And it'll give him the instruction plus be able to do the real time collection of the data. So that is the kind of thing, when we think about new experiences, but really new product and production level efficiencies. Right. We never even thought that in the past. Yeah it's really interesting to sort of think about, the idea of convenience, giving us more time to create. Yeah. Or to sort of Pursue other interests. Obviously in the industrial revolution that was sort of the start of leisure time for everybody. Yeah. You were able to sort of have leisure time and now with robotics, IOT and all of the different things we have coming together and converging right now. We're starting to see maybe a second age of that where we're like okay, so now we're increasing productivity in the industrial market or increasing convenience in the personal market. You're so of able to get that sense of what do I do with the little tiny extra 2 minutes of time that I have now. Well it adds up over time, what do I do with that time? And you mention you know when we think about the cross over where you can see IoT taking hold in the industrial side. Let's talk about retail. So Levi's is one of our customers, a great partner. And they essentially were trying to address one of the big retailer challenges which is out of stocks. The last thing you want to do as a retailer is not have the right pair of jeans in the right spot. You go in there you want to buy them. So we implemented our Intel IoT platform, which also includes an Intel retail center capability. And we worked with Levis to read the data off of their RFID tags that are already sewn into your jeans. I see [UNKNOWN]. And so as the jeans literally move around the store, like the dressing room or on a shelf or something, the store knows exactly where those jeans are. And those that they've been sold or if they're inspect somewhere in the corners. So when the shopper comes in, they can make sure that they've got the right pair of jeans in the right spot for the consumer. So the consumer benefits cuz they get the product they want. Yeah. And the retailer in Levis case make sure that they've got the right product at the right place. Like that story just for some reason reminded me of being a kid where you take a bunch of clothes into a round rack, and you would just pile them in there as a fort. Everybody did that.>>>I don't think I did that.>>>No? Okay. Just double checking. Well now they will be able to find those pants much easier. I'm so sorry [UNKNOWN]. [LAUGH] So sorry. Yeah, all the poor employees are like that's where they are. Harris's, Harris's cove, like I'm so sorry. What do you think is a product or an appliance or an item or an object in our world that is not smart that should be smart. Well that's a great question. I think rather than trying to answer that, I think what should be smart that isn't is sort of I think the question is, what's next? Yeah. Because literally, it really is up to our imagination. In fact Intel sponsors America's Greatest Makers, it's a new reality TV show where we have inventors coming on that has thought of all kinds of things, like taking a glove that will now translate gestures into speech. Sign language, right, or helping a kid put some the little [UNKNOWN] Intel processor in a toothbrush so that you keep the kid on track when he's brushing on the wrong direction. [CROSSTALK] Gum Play, [UNKNOWN] it's this little attachment in Japan. It synchs to an app and it lets you either watch the news, play a video game or play a song while you brush your teeth. And we're like, "Do we need this?" But then that's the point. It's like you gotta keep kids on track sometimes and that's a really good way to do it. And another one is the brain control joystick. So think about when you're gaming or even for the disabled that have the ability to do these kinds of controls. So, the possibilities are really endless. And when we think about what's the one thing that should be smart, we sort of think of it more like, what's the next thing that's gonna be made smart? Right, and it's pretty much an inevitability for just about anything that you have ever used. And I'll tell you, you mentioned and you touched on with the CES Show with the Intel [UNKNOWN] module. Literally, the processor the size of a button. Yeah. Going into things like a toothbrush or something like that In addition to that technology, we have 5G communications coming out that we're investing in. And that's another technology that will make not only these devices smart, but make the connectivity and the experience much more seamless. Faster. Exactly. So they're not just smart in isolation, they're smart together. Together, yeah. And they'll be able to share data back and forth with each other. So my glasses when I'm running are like you forgot to brush your teeth yesterday. [LAUGH] The toothbrush told me. I'm very. Seth your breath smells bad. Thank you. I think we are just about out of time. But thank you so much for coming in and stopping by. My pleasure. We find IOT and we love Future Tech here, obviously. Everyone at home really loves Future Tech. So Thank you for coming by and talking to us about this. Exciting stuff. Come back any time. Well, it's my pleasure on behalf of Intel. I think we're at a time where technology is being valued not just for the devices that it makes, but for the experiences it makes possible. So true. And I think that's very exciting for us. Very cool. Thank you so much. That was The very lovely Bridget Karlin stopping in, managing director of Internet of Things Group at Intel. We will be right back. We've got a lot more delightful things that are going to happen on this show that you're probably more familiar with. Stick around. Stick around.

Up Next

We say goodbye to the show by toasting the future (Tomorrow Daily 411)
adios-v.jpg

Up Next

We say goodbye to the show by toasting the future (Tomorrow Daily 411)

Project Alloy's untethered, gesture-controlled VR headset sounds great to us (Tomorrow Daily 410)
20160816-idf16-intel-project-alloy-demo-001.jpg

Project Alloy's untethered, gesture-controlled VR headset sounds great to us (Tomorrow Daily 410)

Robot showcase features pizza- and sushi-making bots (Tomorrow Daily 409)
sushibot-2.jpg

Robot showcase features pizza- and sushi-making bots (Tomorrow Daily 409)

Connected temporary tattoos are both flashy and functional (Tomorrow Daily 408)
duoskin-3.jpg

Connected temporary tattoos are both flashy and functional (Tomorrow Daily 408)

Smart toast sounds iffy to us, and so does getting a tattoo from a robot (Tomorrow Daily 407)
toast-2.jpg

Smart toast sounds iffy to us, and so does getting a tattoo from a robot (Tomorrow Daily 407)

Microsoft HoloLens meets Legendary movie characters in new demo (Tomorrow Daily 406)
hololens-2.jpg

Microsoft HoloLens meets Legendary movie characters in new demo (Tomorrow Daily 406)

Man bikes across the UK...in VR (Tomorrow Daily 405)
bikevr-1.jpg

Man bikes across the UK...in VR (Tomorrow Daily 405)

Getting a tattoo from an industrial robot looks intense (Tomorrow Daily 404)
tattoo-1.jpg

Getting a tattoo from an industrial robot looks intense (Tomorrow Daily 404)

This robot will pop by and check on your nana at the old folks home (Tomorrow Daily 403)

This robot will pop by and check on your nana at the old folks home (Tomorrow Daily 403)

Tech Shows

The Apple Core
apple-core-w

The Apple Core

Alphabet City
alphabet-city-w

Alphabet City

CNET Top 5
cnet-top-5-w

CNET Top 5

The Daily Charge
dc-site-1color-logo.png

The Daily Charge

What the Future
what-the-future-w

What the Future

Tech Today
tech-today-w

Tech Today

Latest News All latest news

Comparing iPhone 14 Pro and 13 Pro Max cameras
iphone14vsiphone13camcompare-00-00-36-21-still002

Comparing iPhone 14 Pro and 13 Pro Max cameras

We Put a GoPro Against the iPhone 14's Action Mode
iphone14-can-it-replace-gopro-clean

We Put a GoPro Against the iPhone 14's Action Mode

Predicting Microsoft's Next Surface Products
clip0001-00-03-47-11-still008

Predicting Microsoft's Next Surface Products

What We Expect To See in the Pixel 7 and Pixel Watch
pixel7-whattoexpect-2b-00000

What We Expect To See in the Pixel 7 and Pixel Watch

I Don't Own an Electric Car and Here's Why
15851-id-buzzdrivingfootageeuropeanmodel-volkswagen-mp4-00-02-04-02-still002

I Don't Own an Electric Car and Here's Why

What It's Like to Fly in Xwing's Self-Flying Plane
xwing-aircraft-7

What It's Like to Fly in Xwing's Self-Flying Plane

Most Popular All most popular

I Don't Own an Electric Car and Here's Why
15851-id-buzzdrivingfootageeuropeanmodel-volkswagen-mp4-00-02-04-02-still002

I Don't Own an Electric Car and Here's Why

Elon Musk Wants to Sell You an Optimus Robot for Less Than the Price of a Tesla
optimus-for-cms-1

Elon Musk Wants to Sell You an Optimus Robot for Less Than the Price of a Tesla

What It's Like to Fly in Xwing's Self-Flying Plane
xwing-aircraft-7

What It's Like to Fly in Xwing's Self-Flying Plane

Comparing iPhone 14 Pro and 13 Pro Max cameras
iphone14vsiphone13camcompare-00-00-36-21-still002

Comparing iPhone 14 Pro and 13 Pro Max cameras

DART Explained: First Asteroid Crash Images
dart-crash

DART Explained: First Asteroid Crash Images

Predicting Microsoft's Next Surface Products
clip0001-00-03-47-11-still008

Predicting Microsoft's Next Surface Products

Latest Products All latest products

Fitbit Sense 2 First Look: New Software Makes a Difference
fitbit-aroll-00-00-46-14-still001

Fitbit Sense 2 First Look: New Software Makes a Difference

GoPro Hero 11 Black Hands-on: Super-sized Sensor for All Your Socials
gopro1

GoPro Hero 11 Black Hands-on: Super-sized Sensor for All Your Socials

I Tried Out Sony's Upcoming VR Headset on the PlayStation 5
psvr2

I Tried Out Sony's Upcoming VR Headset on the PlayStation 5

Apple Watch Series 8 and Apple Watch SE: First Look
watch8-sepic

Apple Watch Series 8 and Apple Watch SE: First Look

Bose QuietComfort EarBuds 2: Better design, better performance
bose-quietcomforst-ii

Bose QuietComfort EarBuds 2: Better design, better performance

Galaxy Z Flip 4 Review: A Diminutive but Fun Upgrade
flip4

Galaxy Z Flip 4 Review: A Diminutive but Fun Upgrade

Latest How To All how to videos

How to Clean Your Keyboard's Sticky Keys
3keyboards

How to Clean Your Keyboard's Sticky Keys

How to Play Games from PlayStation Plus on PC
psstill

How to Play Games from PlayStation Plus on PC

How to Delete or Disable Your Instagram Account
phoneonorange

How to Delete or Disable Your Instagram Account

Fix Your iPhone Screen With Apple's Self-Service Repair Kit
dsc00641

Fix Your iPhone Screen With Apple's Self-Service Repair Kit

How to Buy a Budget Laptop in 2022
budgetlaptops-00-08-35-15-still001

How to Buy a Budget Laptop in 2022

Google Pay: How to Set Up and Use
googlepay-inhand

Google Pay: How to Set Up and Use