Digital cameras and camcorders
26:18

Digital cameras and camcorders

Photography
[ Music ] ^M00:00:07 >> Dan Ackerman: Hey now everybody. Welcome back to Editors' Office Hours. That's the show where I grab different scene editor and tie them down for half an hour or so to answer your questions. We're back in the Big Apple at long last. It was a little bit dusty. That's why it took us a couple of extra minutes to get started. But I'm very excited to have Lori Grunin here [inaudible]. Welcome Lori. What are you going to be talking about today? >> Lori Grunin: Cameras and camcorders, as usual. >> Dan Ackerman: This is like your third time on the show, which I appreciate. >> Lori Grunin I stopped counting. >> Dan Ackerman: Because a lot of our colleagues are afraid to even come on once. >> Lori Grunin: Ah [inaudible] >> Dan Ackerman: So if you've got a question for Lori, if you're watching this live, there's a big white box over on the side of the screen, you could type it in there. If you're watching this on tape, don't worry, we'll get to all the good questions. Type them in and we're going to get started. All right? >> Lori Grunin: Okie dokie. >> Dan Ackerman: And this is a good question here I'm going to start out with because a lot more people are buying digital SLRs now. They're moving away from the point and shoots. Should I buy one of those packages you see advertised? It's like a camera, body and a lens and maybe even a second lens. Or should I just buy everything separately? What's the best way to approach this? >> Lori Grunin: That's a very interesting question. If you are a beginner -- >> Dan Ackerman: Mm-hmm. >> Lori Grunin: or if you don't have any lenses from previous like film SLRs or something like that, then a kit is generally a good way to get into photography. It's a better out-of-box experience because, you know, you have it all set there. The dual lens kits are great for entry level people because -- >> Dan Ackerman: Okay. >> Lori Grunin: generally, those are the only lenses you'll need for a very long time. >> Dan Ackerman: That's usually what? Like a basic lens is like a telephoto lens? >> Lori Grunin: Yes, exactly. It's usually your standard, say the equivalent of maybe 35 millimeters to 70 milliliters -- milliliters, yeah that's right -- to 75 to 70 millimeters and then a zoom that will go out from say 70 to 120 or longer. It depends upon -- >> Dan Ackerman: Okay. >> Lori Grunin: the camera and the package and stuff. But they usually try to give you two complementary lenses. If you are shooting, or if you're thinking of buying a more expensive camera, I would say the class of, you know, Canon 50 D or up -- >> Dan Ackerman: Now what kind of price range do you count as a more expensive camera? >> Lori Grunin: Like $1200 or more. >> Dan Ackerman: Okay. >> Lori Grunin: Then, you really want to think about what it is you plan to be shooting, because if you're going for a more expensive camera, you generally have more of an idea of what you want to be doing. You're not sort of playing around and trying to feel the product out. >> Dan Ackerman: You probably have some experience. >> Lori Grunin: And also, you know, while, for instance the more expensive cameras, if they do have a kit version, >> Dan Ackerman: Mm-hmm. >> Lori Grunin: they generally have a decent kit lens. When you're talking about the high resolution, mid-range cameras like, you know, the 14 megapixels of the 50D up to like 21 megapixels for the 5D Mark II, the better the lens is -- you really need a really good lens for -- >> Dan Ackerman: You can really tell at that level. >> Lori Grunin: the high resolution. Yes. >> Dan Ackerman: Whether it's a cheapy lens or not. >> Lori Grunin: And the kit lenses are generally sort of just okay. >> Dan Ackerman: Mediocre, medium level. >> Lori Grunin: Right. So you may want to think about spending more for a non-kit lens. >> Dan Ackerman: Okay. Now what do you generally get in a kit? >> Lori Grunin: Kit usually refers to just basically the body -- >> Dan Ackerman: The body and the lens. >> Lori Grunin: plus a lens or two lenses. >> Dan Ackerman: Okay. >> Lori Grunin: Who is it -- Pentax came out with a very interesting low-end kit for K2000, which has a lens and a flash unit. >> Dan Ackerman: Mm-hmm, ah. Okay. >> Lori Grunin: And that's for entry level. And that's a very interesting kit too, because really with digital SLR you just shouldn't be using the on-camera flash. >> Dan Ackerman: Right. You need a flash. >> Lori Grunin: Yeah, you don't -- it works, but it's very harsh and produces harsh shadows and stuff like that. >> Dan Ackerman: Mm-hmm. >> Lori Grunin: So you want to take advantage of the fact that it has a hot shoe. So that's a nice kit too. >> Dan Ackerman: Well that actually brings us to another question. I know we've talked about this before, but lenses and the flashes that fit into the hot shoes, they're generally not compatible -- they're not compatible at all between different brands of cameras, right? >> Lori Grunin: Correct. >> Dan Ackerman: Are they generally compatible between different cameras in the same brand, [inaudible] different Nikons, different Canons, different Sonys, whatever? >> Lori Grunin: Yes. Well, flashes yes. >> Dan Ackerman: Okay. >> Lori Grunin: There's generally a standard within -- >> Dan Ackerman: Can't they just make one? It's a flash. They look the same. >> Lori Grunin: Oh, well in terms of compatibility, they are all. They come in different sizes and power outputs, etcetera because there are different classes of flash users as well. >> Dan Ackerman: But you can't use your Nikon flash on your Sony camera. >> Lori Grunin: Oh, yes. >> Dan Ackerman: That's one thing. >> Lori Grunin: That sort of, yeah. >> Dan Ackerman: It's like a USB port. Can we just make this all the same? >> Lori Grunin: Yeah, well, but the camera vendors have pretty much had them locked in. >> Dan Ackerman: Mm-hmm. >> Lori Grunin: And it means changing pin outputs. >> Dan Ackerman: [inaudible] >> Lori Grunin: And they wouldn't be forwardly [inaudible]. But anyway, lenses are a little more -- >> Dan Ackerman: It's only me thinking of the consumer. >> Lori Grunin: Lenses are a little more difficult. There are certain -- for instance like the Canon EFS mount, it can take both the EFS lenses and the regular old-fashioned lenses, the FS or the compact specifically made for digital camera's lenses. >> Dan Ackerman: Okay. >> Lori Grunin: But, there are some times when those aren't compatible where they've made them [inaudible] -- >> Dan Ackerman: All right. So there are a few exceptions, but generally -- >> Lori Grunin: Because they don't want people accidentally using a lens that's really not suited for the camera. >> Dan Ackerman: Okay. But if I have like a D40 and I trade it for like a D90, I can use the same -- >> Lori Grunin: Yes. >> Dan Ackerman: The lenses and the flash would probably be compatible between them. >> Lori Grunin: And frankly, within a brand of lenses, people tend to assume that they're not compatible when they really are. >> Dan Ackerman: Mm-hmm. >> Lori Grunin: So, what you need to do, download the manual for whatever camera you have and generally there's a list, especially from companies like Canon and Nikon telling you exactly which lenses are compatible and -- >> Dan Ackerman: Okay, like a big chart. >> Lori Grunin: what you lose, like -- yes this works, but it doesn't support the auto focus, that sort of [inaudible]. >> Dan Ackerman: Right, right. >> Lori Grunin: So always check. Don't assume that it won't work. >> Dan Ackerman: I'm surprised nobody makes a little adapter that maybe can screw on to the body and you could put other brands of lenses on that. >> Lori Grunin: Well, third party -- >> Dan Ackerman: Oh. >> Lori Grunin: Third parties, like Sigma and [inaudible] >> Dan Ackerman: Okay. >> Lori Grunin: Well, they actually make lenses specifically designed for -- like one lens with different mounts for [inaudible] >> Dan Ackerman: Oh, okay, okay, the little thing on the end there. >> Lori Grunin: The thing about the adapter is that's expensive. >> Dan Ackerman: [inaudible], okay. >> Lori Grunin: Olympus does make adapters for their old lenses. >> Dan Ackerman: Mm-hmm. >> Lori Grunin: To fit on their [inaudible] bodies, but adapters can be kind of tricky. >> Dan Ackerman: It's always kind of a cut. You're adding another piece of plastic or whatever there. >> Lori Grunin: Yeah, and the more distance you add, you lose light, you have to do focal length conversions, etcetera, so -- >> Dan Ackerman: Okay. So more trouble than it's worth. >> Lori Grunin: Sometimes, yes. >> Dan Ackerman: Speaking of visual SLRs, now do they usually -- this is another question, but do they usually shoot video as well? Or do they just do pictures? I know a lot of point and shoot cameras do video now, but I've never seen anyone shoot video with an SLR. >> Lori Grunin: There's only two SLRs that do video. It's relatively new. The D90, when it came out in August was the first one to do it. And now the Canon EOS 5D Mark II also does video. I think in the future -- I mean I haven't heard any manufacturer specifically talking about rolling it out across the product lines, but we're definitely going to see it happening more and more. >> Dan Ackerman: Okay, so a trend, but a slow trend. >> Lori Grunin: Yeah. >> Dan Ackerman: And we were talking about flashes a minute ago. Here's a question. My flash is too overpowering. Which way should I point it, overhead, to the side? >> Lori Grunin: Well, the flashes have -- >> Dan Ackerman: A lot of settings on them I'm sure. >> Lori Grunin: Yes. >> Dan Ackerman: A lot of people probably just plug them in and start shooting because -- >> Lori Grunin: Right, but you should be looking for the flash exposure compensation setting on your camera. >> Dan Ackerman: And that on the -- >> Lori Grunin: Which allows you to dial it down. >> Dan Ackerman: on the camera itself, not on the flash. >> Lori Grunin: Well, depending upon the flash. >> Dan Ackerman: Okay. >> Lori Grunin: Some of them will allow you to control it on the flash. A lot of them will allow you to control it on the body. >> Dan Ackerman: Okay. >> Lori Grunin: Unless you have an older flash unit and it may not be talking to the body. >> Dan Ackerman: I assume they're talking about the kind that goes, you know, up and down and then also curves to the side. >> Lori Grunin: Right. So, the first thing you do is use your flash exposure compensation to dial it back. >> Dan Ackerman: Okay. >> Lori Grunin: Then, if it's too bright directly on the subject, then point it up and bounce off, or point it to the side. >> Dan Ackerman: To the side. Whatever works best in that particular -- >> Lori Grunin: Anything but straight on. And also, frankly, if it's down in this position, >> Dan Ackerman: Mm-hmm. >> Lori Grunin: that's going to give you the most light. >> Dan Ackerman: The brightest, because it's right on them, whoever it is. >> Lori Grunin: So, yeah. You definitely want to tilt it. It may have a diffuser, you want to diffuse it. You can, if your camera doesn't have a built-in -- if your flash doesn't have a built-in diffuser, tape some transparency paper across it. >> Dan Ackerman: Right, right. >> Lori Grunin: Or a paper towel, something. You can cut the amount of the flash that comes out. >> Dan Ackerman: Okay, okay. Now this is a great question. What is a safe place to buy a camera, especially online? Because I know that -- I don't think there's anything shadier than online camera sales people or online camera sites. I get more complaints about that than I think anything else on the planet. >> Lori Grunin: Well, and frankly, the first thing to do is go to the forums and see. >> Dan Ackerman: Mm-hmm. >> Lori Grunin: Some of these places have threads that are like two or three years old with people complaining about them. >> Dan Ackerman: Oh, of course. And they're always changing their names and starting up under new names and they're usually the ones with the most outrageous prices that are probably too good to be true. >> Lori Grunin: Uh-huh. So, one way to be safe is to buy from someplace you've heard of before, you know? >> Dan Ackerman: Mm-hmm. >> Lori Grunin: Or to go with a general place that, you know, you've bought other things from. >> Dan Ackerman: Okay. >> Lori Grunin: The other thing is -- >> Dan Ackerman: But you also don't want to pay too much, because sometimes people feel like if they shop around online, they can find a better deal than if they just go like the store, you know, big brick and mortar store. >> Lori Grunin: Well my personal theory on shopping online is -- >> Dan Ackerman: Mm-hmm. >> Lori Grunin: I never go for the place with the cheapest price. >> Dan Ackerman: Sure. >> Lori Grunin: I tend to go to the place that has a price in the middle. >> Dan Ackerman: Mm-hmm. >> Lori Grunin: And that, you know, I look at all the terms. If I've never bought there before, >> Dan Ackerman: Mm-hmm. >> Lori Grunin: I Google them to make sure I don't see any complaints. >> Dan Ackerman: See what other people are saying about them. >> Lori Grunin: Right. So you just even -- and thing is that even a place that has a good history, you never, you know, they're up and down. >> Dan Ackerman: Okay. >> Lori Grunin: You never know. They may be going through a patch where a lot of -- they've had problems with returns or something like that. >> Dan Ackerman: Mm-hmm. >> Lori Grunin: And a lot of people are complaining. So, frankly, you need to do the research on the place to buy every single time you buy a big-ticket item. >> Dan Ackerman: Okay. Now generally, are cameras the kind of item that you can find a good discount on? Or are they kind of item that generally stays around the MSRP because that's dictated by the companies that make them? >> Lori Grunin: That goes on a brand by brand basis. >> Dan Ackerman: Okay. >> Lori Grunin: With Sonys, you generally don't find big discounts on. >> Dan Ackerman: Mm-hmm. >> Lori Grunin: Any company that has an authorized dealer system, like Sony -- >> Dan Ackerman: Okay. >> Lori Grunin: It's hard to find any real bargains. >> Dan Ackerman: Mm-hmm. >> Lori Grunin: But for other manufacturers, generally there tends to be a pretty wide variety. >> Dan Ackerman: Oh, okay. >> Lori Grunin: And I have to -- there's an -- actually know your list prices. That's another thing that I tell people. >> Dan Ackerman: Mm-hmm. >> Lori Grunin: Because there are places that charge more than list. >> Dan Ackerman: Oh, I'm sure. >> Lori Grunin: And, you know, you don't want to -- >> Dan Ackerman: All those little camera stores up and down -- used to be Broadway. Now they're all gone. But I always think of B and H and J and R kind of as places to go. But I always like they're charging me the list price almost or close to it. >> Lori Grunin: That varies on a product-by-product basis. You can't go in there assuming it's going to be the lowest price and you can't go in there assuming it's going to be the highest price. >> Dan Ackerman: But they're generally trustworthy retailers that have been around for a long time. >> Lori Grunin: Yeah, yes. >> Dan Ackerman: If you don't want to go super commercial and go to like Best Buy or something. >> Lori Grunin: Right. Although as I said, the other thing I do recommend is to go someplace and feel the camera, hold it, etcetera before you buy it online. >> Dan Ackerman: Oh, sure. Okay, okay. So let's take a quick break right now and check out a product video. What product video are we going to be watching? >> Lori Grunin: The Canon EOS 5D Mark II. >> Dan Ackerman: Okay. >> Lori Grunin: Just finished the review. It's got an Editors' Choice. >> Dan Ackerman: You feel this is one of your better videos. You're really kind of, you know, sell the experience on people? >> Lori Grunin: I don't know. I don't watch my videos. >> Dan Ackerman: I guess we're going to find out. I don't either. All right. Let's roll that video and we'll be back in just a minute. ^M00:11:30 [ Background music ] >> Lori Grunin: Hi. I'm Lori Grunin, Senior Editor with CNET and this is the Canon EOS 5D Mark II. This is one of our Editors' Choices for digital SLRs because it provides such a great value for a mid-range to high-end camera. It's a full frame sensor, 21 megapixels and, like the Nikon D90, it provides video capture. While the video capture isn't one of the reasons I really picked it to be an Editors' Choice, it's still really neat, and it works very well. It produces great images. It's fast, although not for continuous shooting. It's still not a sports shooter like the higher-end EOS 1D series, but for single shots, it's really good. This camera also has Canon's relatively new creative auto mode, which the company introduced in the 50D. It makes even less sense to have it in this model than it did in the 50D. Creative auto is kind of a dumbed-down mode where you pick like, brighter or darker, that's really not suitable for the level of user who's going to pay $2700 for a camera. Pretty much all Canon digital SLRs, it has the same type of electronic controls, which you drive via a combination of button and dial presses. I miss having some real buttons and switches that directly control. For instance like Nikon and Sony on the A900 have a metering switch that you just select. You don't have to press and move. I find setting a metering switch a little faster to use than the combination of button and dials. But, if you're a Canon user, you'll feel immediately at home with this camera. It also has the joystick and control dial that you'll find on a lot of the other Canon digital SLRs and those I really like. Haven't gotten tired of those. It uses the same three and a half inch LCD that most other digital SLRs in its class use. Nice and bright, but still you don't really want to be making a lot of exposure and color decisions based on it. It's very comfortable to shoot with and, of course, it's a lot lighter than its older siblings, the EOS 1Ds, which have the vertical grip and those are very heavy. So if you're looking for a pro camera that's not as heavy as those and can do most of what you need, the Canon EOS 5D Mark II will fill the bill. I'm Lori Grunin. This is the Canon EOS 5D Mark II. ^M00:13:52 [ Music ] ^M00:13:54 >> Dan Ackerman: Hey now everybody. We are back. It's Editors' Office Hours. I'm Dan Ackerman. Lori Grunin is here with me. We have tied Lori down to force her to answer your questions. We've got about 10 or 11 minutes left. If you've got some questions you want to get in. We've got a ton of them right here, actually. Somebody's asking about SDHC card and how those are different from regular SD cards and will I notice a speed difference in taking pictures or transferring images if I use an SDHC card? >> Lori Grunin: I get that question so often. The difference between SD and SDHC cards is basically capacity. They increased the capacity for SDHC, which stands for high capacity -- >> Dan Ackerman: High capacity. >> Lori Grunin: by using a different file system. >> Dan Ackerman: Okay. >> Lori Grunin: So, SDHC cards are not -- you can -- they're not backwardly compatible if the device you have -- >> Dan Ackerman: Only takes SD cards. >> Lori Grunin: only supports SD. Right, exactly. However SD is forwardly compatible. Now in terms of performance, the reason why SDHC cards tend to be faster is because they're newer and more expensive. >> Dan Ackerman: Mm-hmm. >> Lori Grunin: The margins are bigger and they put the newer technology in there. Will you notice a difference in speed? Yes, at the very least when copying files from the reader -- >> Dan Ackerman: Right, to the computer. >> Lori Grunin: to a computer. >> Dan Ackerman: I have noticed that. >> Lori Grunin: In the camera, it depends. If you have a newer camera, you might be able to capture more frames in continuous shooting modes. >> Dan Ackerman: Okay. >> Lori Grunin: But you won't necessarily notice a speed difference when you're shooting. >> Dan Ackerman: As in you take a picture and then it's ready to take the next picture. >> Lori Grunin: Right. >> Dan Ackerman: You won't see a big improvement there. >> Lori Grunin: Right. But we have noticed that when you're shooting in burst mode, it manages to save the files faster and to clear out the buffer. >> Dan Ackerman: So you can get more pictures in. >> Lori Grunin: Right. >> Dan Ackerman: Right. Okay. Now about how big do SDHC cards get? >> Lori Grunin: Right now they go up to 64 gigs. >> Dan Ackerman: Wow. >> Lori Grunin: To get beyond that, they introduced a new format, SDX-- >> Dan Ackerman: SD Super HC? >> Lori Grunin: X -- >> Dan Ackerman: Extremely high capacity? >> Lori Grunin: Yes. >> Dan Ackerman: Oh seriously? I was just kidding. >> Lori Grunin: Yeah. And those to into the terabytes. Of course no products exist now, although I think somebody announced that they'd have a card by the end of the year. >> Dan Ackerman: There aren't enough things in the world to take pictures of to fill up that much. Okay, maybe there are. >> Lori Grunin: Yes, but, well but the other thing is video. Remember that. >> Dan Ackerman: Oh, that's right, video. Good for the video. Speaking of video, do you know of a good flash HD camcorder? Somebody's looking for a suggestion for a flash-based, I guess a solid state hard drive based camcorder. I know there's a whole bunch of those out there now. >> Lori Grunin: Yeah, as a matter of fact they seem to be really popular. Canon HF -- they have whole series that are basically the same, the HF 11, HF 10, HF 100. They're pretty much very similar models. Sony's high-end, the CX 12 and then they just announced some new ones which we haven't tested yet -- >> Dan Ackerman: Okay. >> Lori Grunin: But frankly I don't expect them to be worse than their predecessors. >> Dan Ackerman: Are they generally pretty small, right? Because I remember -- >> Lori Grunin: Yeah, one thing that we have noticed, and noticed at CES is they're sort of splitting their high-end flash camcorders into two camps. >> Dan Ackerman: Okay. >> Lori Grunin: The ones that really take advantage of the size and because you can make them a lot more compact. >> Dan Ackerman: Mm-hmm. >> Lori Grunin: And the ones that still keep a larger size so that they can have a nice big lens. >> Dan Ackerman: Yes. >> Lori Grunin: And that's really sort of the lower limitation you want on your HD camcorders is you want a big lens because it's faster, more light and you just get better quality. But, you know, it's the trade-off. >> Dan Ackerman: Now even though they call a lot of these HD camcorders, they're different structurally than those little, like flip-style HD camcorders that are like 200 bucks. >> Lori Grunin: Yes, right. >> Dan Ackerman: You know, they call those HD. It's not the same HD. What's the difference? >> Lori Grunin: Well HD, all that refers to is the resolution of the video. >> Dan Ackerman: Of the video. >> Lori Grunin: 1920 by 1080 or in some cases -- >> Dan Ackerman: Or 720. >> Lori Grunin: Exactly. So that's really all they have in common is they produce video with the same -- >> Dan Ackerman: Output resolution. >> Lori Grunin: Exactly. They've conformed to the standard. However, to shoot really good HD video, you want to start out with a higher resolution sensor. >> Dan Ackerman: Mm-hmm. >> Lori Grunin: I mean, like a three megapixel sensor, even though you're not using it in the final output, you can still get much sharper -- >> Dan Ackerman: Okay, [inaudible] to play with. >> Lori Grunin: raw video before -- exactly. So the smaller camcorders use smaller low-resolution sensors so they don't have as much to play with. >> Dan Ackerman: And little, tiny lenses. >> Lori Grunin: And little tiny lenses. They're just, you know, so -- >> Dan Ackerman: So even if you have flip HD -- >> Lori Grunin: For the price, they're good. >> Dan Ackerman: or creative HD, it's the not the same as shooting with even a low-end full-size HD camcorder. >> Lori Grunin: Exactly. >> Dan Ackerman: Although, people can get some very decent results out of them -- >> Lori Grunin: Yeah. >> Dan Ackerman: depending on the lighting and -- >> Lori Grunin: They're perfect for cat videos, you know. >> Dan Ackerman: Perfect for cat videos. I like that, I like that. Or intern videos. >> Lori Grunin: Yeah, or -- >> Dan Ackerman: Or lab [inaudible] videos. I should just -- >> Lori Grunin: Or drinking videos. >> Dan Ackerman: Hurray. Let's see, what else? Oh, here's a great one. Do you guys have any ideas on how to fix corrupted photos that you get off a card that goes bad or a camera that goes bad or a session that goes bad or you leave your SG card in your pocket when you put your pants in the wash or something? >> Lori Grunin: I think I did that once, actually. >> Dan Ackerman: Were you able to recover the pictures? >> Lori Grunin: Compact flash card, did not -- >> Dan Ackerman: Solid-state technology. It's very reliable, people. >> Lori Grunin: Yes. The first thing you should accept is you may not be able to fix it. >> Dan Ackerman: Okay. >> Lori Grunin: They pretty much can do some miracles these days, but you know, consider it, you know, a windfall if you can actually fix them. There's lots of software things called things like RescuePro -- >> Dan Ackerman: Yeah. I've seen a lot of those. >> Lori Grunin: I'd go to Download.com and search on, you know -- >> Dan Ackerman: Nice plug. >> Lori Grunin: Yeah. And search on photo recovery software. >> Dan Ackerman: Okay. Now should you have to buy something, or are there enough good free [inaudible] out there? >> Lori Grunin: You're probably going to end up buying it because there's usually -- most of them there's like free trials -- >> Dan Ackerman: Okay. >> Lori Grunin: but I hate the free trials of all of these rescuing [inaudible] hard disc rescue, because they'll say well you can use it, but you can't save the results. >> Dan Ackerman: But you can't save the files and you can't see all the results. >> Lori Grunin: It's like, you know, give me two freebies, you know. >> Dan Ackerman: Or something. And the free ones generally, the menus are harder to use, they're not as full-featured and stuff. But a lot of stuff's not very expensive. It's like 20 of 30 bucks usually. >> Lori Grunin: Right. That's true. I'm notoriously cheap. >> Dan Ackerman: And you shouldn't have to go to like a recovery service like they used to have. >> Lori Grunin: Oh, no. Absolutely not. >> Dan Ackerman: Yeah. Unless these are the most valuable photos in the world that you're -- >> Lori Grunin: Just one -- they are very, very slow because they basically have to go through every single sector of the card and try to match them up. >> Dan Ackerman: Okay. >> Lori Grunin: Because really what happens when -- a corrupted photo usually means that the index of the files has gotten all scrambled. >> Dan Ackerman: Mm-hmm. And there's always the header that tell you which bits go to which file. >> Lori Grunin: Exactly, right. The file allocation table. >> Dan Ackerman: And sometimes you'll end up with a result that's like a half a picture and then it breaks up halfway through. >> Lori Grunin: Exactly, yes. >> Dan Ackerman: So you save what you can. Now will different programs give you a different result? >> Lori Grunin: The other thing that you may want to try though, because one thing I have noticed is sometimes copying over the files, if you're drive isn't that reliable -- >> Dan Ackerman: Mm-hmm. >> Lori Grunin: it can become scrambled when the original file is fine. >> Dan Ackerman: Mm-hmm. >> Lori Grunin: It's the transfer that screwed it up. >> Dan Ackerman: Okay. >> Lori Grunin: So you want to try recopying and try changing your USB cable, because if the cable can screw it up too. >> Dan Ackerman: Because people think it's all digital so it doesn't even matter what kind of cable you have. >> Lori Grunin: Right, yeah. >> Dan Ackerman: Because it's just ones and zeros. But that's not always the case. >> Lori Grunin: Correct. >> Dan Ackerman: Okay. Here's a good specific model question. I'm trying to decide between a Sony A900 or a Nikon D90. Which one is better? >> Lori Grunin: Um >> Dan Ackerman: How about that for a shoot-out right there? >> Lori Grunin: Well, except the D90 costs about $900 -- >> Dan Ackerman: Okay. >> Lori Grunin: And the A90 costs about $3000 -- A900 I mean costs -- >> Dan Ackerman: So probably a little bit of an edge there. >> Lori Grunin: Yeah. And I mean, if you're even considering the -- I mean they're like apples and oranges. >> Dan Ackerman: Sure. >> Lori Grunin: The A900 is full-frame. It produces huge files. >> Dan Ackerman: What does full-frame mean? I've heard that a bunch of times recently. >> Lori Grunin: It just means that the sensor is the same size as a frame of 35 millimeter film. >> Dan Ackerman: Okay. >> Lori Grunin: So it's best when you're using old, you know, old lenses or the designed -- >> Dan Ackerman: For the biggest [inaudible]. >> Lori Grunin: Yes. It's definitely bigger. The next size up would be a medium-format sensor. >> Dan Ackerman: Okay. >> Lori Grunin: So, yes they're bigger. >> Dan Ackerman: So medium is bigger than full. >> Lori Grunin: I never thought about it that way. >> Dan Ackerman: [inaudible] like jumbo shrimp. >> Lori Grunin: Yeah. >> Dan Ackerman: So that's a whole other category. If you're in the Sony A900 market, congratulations to you. Obviously the economic downturn is doing you no harm and you don't need our help. You're doing just fine. We're going to come to you for some advice. Finally, we're running pretty low on time here. I've got a question for you. Why doesn't Apple put an SD card slot in those MacBooks? What is wrong with these people? >> Lori Grunin: I've been asking myself that for years. >> Dan Ackerman: I've been asking them for years. >> Lori Grunin: Yeah. >> Dan Ackerman: Wouldn't that be a big [inaudible]. So many photographers use MacBooks. >> Lori Grunin: Yes, in which case, you'd want them to put a CF card slot -- >> Dan Ackerman: Okay, or a -- that's right high-end, okay. >> Lori Grunin: because high-end SLRs all use CF. >> Dan Ackerman: Now, at what level do you switch over? Like the D90 has an SD card, right? >> Lori Grunin: Yeah, it happens at the, like the $1200 mark, about. >> Dan Ackerman: Okay. So that Sony, for instance, has a compact flash card. >> Lori Grunin: CF, yes. And a memory stick. >> Dan Ackerman: And [inaudible] like it's a Sony. Now why do they stick with compact flash? To me that's an older technology. >> Lori Grunin: It is older, but they're also -- CF is -- >> Dan Ackerman: Is it a very high capacity technology still? >> Lori Grunin: Well, it ramps up in capacity faster than SD does. >> Dan Ackerman: Okay. >> Lori Grunin: So, plus there's lots of -- pros have very expensive older equipment and -- >> Dan Ackerman: And a lot of them -- it's sort of -- >> Lori Grunin: Exactly. >> Dan Ackerman: It's not that compact flash cards are any better technically than SD cards in some major way that's going to change your life, it's that it's grandfathered in with a lot of people that have old, expensive equipment. >> Lori Grunin: Yeah. Sometimes they'll have dual slots. They'll have a CF and an SD. >> Dan Ackerman: Yeah, I've seen that. >> Lori Grunin: But -- and the CF still tends to be, I believe, a little faster. >> Dan Ackerman: Ah, okay. >> Lori Grunin: There's more faster CF card than SD cards. >> Dan Ackerman: Ah, all right, all right. Now you've been actually testing out this big Lenovo laptop that's aimed at photographers and artists. It's like the W700. >> Lori Grunin: It's going to be big. >> Dan Ackerman: It's got a big 17-inch screen, but then it has a secondary display. >> Lori Grunin: A 10.6 inch display [inaudible]. >> Dan Ackerman: That slides out and is set in a portrait mode. >> Lori Grunin: Yes. It's for holding your palettes like in PhotoShop or when you're doing video editing. >> Dan Ackerman: You're toolbars and stuff. >> Lori Grunin: Yes. >> Dan Ackerman: And what do you think of that so far? Have you been playing around with it at all? >> Lori Grunin: The display is very nice. >> Dan Ackerman: Both displays. >> Lori Grunin: Well, see, but you don't really care about the quality of the one on the right. >> Dan Ackerman: Okay. >> Lori Grunin: Because it is for doing standard, you know, looking at palettes. The one thing that Lenovo did when they created that second display is it's about the same pixel resolution -- >> Dan Ackerman: Okay. >> Lori Grunin: as the main display. So you don't see, you know, what happens when you have two displays -- >> Dan Ackerman: Right, right. >> Lori Grunin: and one's set at a different resolution and everything changes sizes. >> Dan Ackerman: Mm-hmm. >> Lori Grunin: So that's very well thought out. >> Dan Ackerman: Okay. >> Lori Grunin: It's very nice. >> Dan Ackerman: But the main display, is that 16 by 12? >> Lori Grunin: I can't remember. >> Dan Ackerman: It's something very high with 17-inch resolution. >> Lori Grunin: Yes, yes. >> Dan Ackerman: Okay. >> Lori Grunin: It's a good resolution. It's also, it's wide-gamut, which means it can display more colors than your standard laptop display. >> Dan Ackerman: Mm-hmm. >> Lori Grunin: And everything looks really nice on it. >> Dan Ackerman: That's it. >> Lori Grunin: I'm still trying to figure out how accurate it is. >> Dan Ackerman: Mm-hmm. >> Lori Grunin: And I have to do some printing and color matching and stuff like that. >> Dan Ackerman: So that, or 17-inch MacBook Pro, what would you take right now if you had do something with some pictures? >> Lori Grunin: Personally, I wouldn't take either one. My back would never forgive me. >> Dan Ackerman: Or if you had to set up somewhere with one of them? >> Lori Grunin: Well, I actually might go for the Lenovo. >> Dan Ackerman: Okay. There you go. Extra screen. And of course, it has an SD card slot, right? >> Lori Grunin: Yes and a CF card slot -- >> Dan Ackerman: And a Compact flash. >> Lori Grunin: and a [inaudible] built in. >> Dan Ackerman: Oh, see that. Oh that's right. It's got the little tablet there. Yeah. >> Lori Grunin: And it's a built-in color calibrator. So, they really, you know, there's a lot of nice stuff in there. >> Dan Ackerman: Steve Jobs, take notes. All right. Fantastic. We have run out of time even on this extended edition of Editors' Office Hours. Thank you Lori for joining me. Any quick plugs to throw in here? I know you have a show or something. >> Lori Grunin: A podcast. >> Dan Ackerman: A podcast. >> Lori Grunin: Our weekly podcast, which has also suffered some hiccups because of the holidays, but it's generally every Thursday. >> Dan Ackerman: Okay. >> Lori Grunin: Indecent exposure. CNET.com. >> Dan Ackerman: Oh I get it, because it's about cameras. >> Lori Grunin: Yeah. >> Dan Ackerman: [inaudible] see? >> Lori Grunin: And you can get it on iTunes, too. >> Dan Ackerman: And on iTunes. Well, all right. Join us next week for another exciting Editors' Office Hours. Until then, I'm Dan Ackerman. >> Lori Grunin: And I'm Lori Grunin. >> Dan Ackerman: There you go. See you next time. ^M00:26:12 [ Music ]

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