CNET Live: November 6, 2008
CNET Live: November 6, 2008
33:13

CNET Live: November 6, 2008

Culture
^M00:00:05 [ Music ] ^M00:00:10 [ Background music ] >> Are you sitting comfortably? Good. Coming up on CNET Live, we'll take a tour of Windows 7. >> Really? Plus we'll discuss whether Theora will be the MP3 of video. >> And of course as always we're taking your calls and video questions. Give us a call, 888-900-2638 because CNET Live starts now. ^M00:00:30 [ Music ] ^M00:00:37 [ Background music ] >> You can always tell the difference between a man and another man in terms of how they turn. When we turn the camera, I shift in my chair. Dr. Merritt turns his chair. >> It's a clinic we're putting on today. >> Starting our show with that little piece of information, you know we're going downhill from there. It's CNET Live, I'm Brian Cooley. >> I'm Tom Merritt. >> And in the corner no, I mean the nook is Brian Tong. >> I'm facing the camera so I don't turn. [ Simultaneous talking ] >> You're the third option. >> He's just dead on, dead on. BT is there. >> When you call the number, 888-900-2638, which you can call right now by the way 'cause there is actually more than 1 line open. Christine will talk to you. She'll tell you everything you need to know to get on the show. >> That's right. Before we get you through that and take some of those calls, let's take a look at a couple of things we crave. [ Background music ] >> These are some of our favorite things from the Crave Blog at crave.cnet.com, actually two of our favorite things from the Crave Blog over the past week. You almost picked this one, didn't you? >> I came so close. It's either a great minds think alike or both are a couple of suckers. >> I am a big sucker for these things Ecotones from Adaptive Sound Technologies. It's one of those products that plays nature sounds to soothe you, to calm you. >> This has been around for 30 years. >> Yeah, they have been around forever but the new thing from Adaptive Sound Technologies is that Ecotones actually listens to the ambient noise and let's say a truck goes by or somebody drops something outside your window, it brings up extra sounds to cover that so you know-- >> That sounds realtime-- >> When the truck goes by a walrus will start squawking or something to-- >> I'm not sure that's better-- >> --kinda blended it in to whatever nature sound you got. I got a couple a--let's see if we could pick these up on my mic. I've got--here's the thunder storm, most of them, maybe that's the MP3. >> It sounds wet. >> Yeah, they sound a little better than the crappie ones I've purchased in the past. >> Yeah, some of those things are horrendous. They just sound like there's a bad circuit inside. >> Yeah, exactly. >> But I like the fact this has instantaneous momentary masking. >> It's about 300 bucks though so. >> Yeah, it's a lot of money for basically a gimmick. >> Yeah. >> Okay, let's take a look at mine. >> A little bit on the price. >> Which is a basically a gimmick also. Okay so let's see. You like the idea of Apple TV but you don't want Apple TV. You want a wide open Swiss Army knife style product. This is from Western Digital and I was just down on the set with Dong Ngo the other day as he did a first look on it which you should check out. It's called the Western Digital WD TV Media Player. You know the idea here, you bring media on a portable hard drive and this thing ports into your hi-def TV. What I like about it though is, it has a very sleek looking interface, the box itself is very small and good looking and it's got 2 USB ports for 2 simultaneous external drives. You can plug into it of any type of storage and 1080p output. That's interesting. Now of course your media has to be at that resolution. I don't believe it's an up scaler, but still the fact that it can go there is pretty hot and we're starting to get to the era of really hi-res files. >> That same price was the Popcorn Hour box which was my favorite of those up 'til now. >> Yeah, they're all around the hundred to a little hundred over. >> You could--'cause it stream as well. >> I don't think-- >> Well that's one thing that Popcorn Hour does. You can either plug a hard drive into it by USB or you can stream off of a computer on your home network. >> That's a good question. [ Simultaneous talking ] >> 'Cause this is a much more user-friendly version, Popcorn Hour is okay. >> This has a great interface too. >> It's a little rough around the edges, yeah. >> Alright, let's get to one of our video calls, shall we? >> Let's do. We are taking the video questions, don't forget. You can submit your links to us at CNET Live at CNET.com. Just upload your video to your favorite hosting service and send us the link. That's exactly what Rob from Houston, Texas did. Roll it. >> Hey CNET guys, I have a question about my Apple TV. I've been wanting to put my DVD collection into a hard drive using HandBrake and play it from my Apple TV in the USB drive. Is there a good way or an easy way to do that? >> Alright, we got a couple of different approaches to this problem. >> Good question to clarify on that. >> A-ha, does he scare you? He's got guts. >> Yeah, I give 'em that. >> Yeah. >> You guys better get the answer right. >> We wanna help them out. >> Or we're gonna be carried out of here by the handles. >> BT, it's all on you. >> Yeah, I don't want him to hurt me but this is what you can do. First of all, if you have an external USB-based hard drive, you can plug it directly into the Apple TV but you're gonna have to hack it. There's kind of a home brewed way to do that and on our show notes we have it. A website you can refer to is appletvhacks.net so they show you step by step. The main thing about this is that your Apple TV will just be use to boot up. The storage capacity on that Apple TV will not be used and all your files and music will be on this external hard drive that you have to physically put those files on. Now, for a lot of other Apple TV users they're curious, you know how can I get more of my files on to a different hard drive or use my music and videos. What Apple TV does is really it talks to iTunes to stream all that content on to the Apple TV and if you don't wanna take up all the storage space on your hard drive on your main computer, you can dump all those files on an external drive then in iTunes going to the preferences and advanced. Under the Advanced tab you can actually select that external hard drive is your entire iTunes collection and everything from there will go to Apple TV if that makes sense. Did I make sense? >> Yeah, yeah. >> So, there's a couple ways to do it. I mean he could do this too, even with the external drive. He just wouldn't be plugging it in to the back of the Apple TV. >> Directly, yes, correct. >> One other way to do it, I mean like if you'd use HandBrake, put 'em in to a dot-mov and then just stream 'em right to the Apple TV or have 'em upload it directly to the Apple TV, the normal Apple TV way. Or if you can get into the private maybe a Boxie, I did a video on this. Boxie will allow you to stream videos off of your hard drive. So, again you can store 'em on an external drive. Just plug that drive into your computer. Stream 'em over that way. So, about 4 different options there for you, please don't hurt us. [ Laughter ] >> Yes, the most important thing. Let's go to our live phone calls. Let's go to Alex in Pennsylvania. Interesting questions on how he's shopping for an MP3 player with a criteria we don't often hear about. Alex welcome to CNET Live. How can we help you? >> Okay, so I was looking for an MP3 player that had a touch screen preferably where it has to be kind of big. Then, also I kind of wanted it to work on Linux. I actually really do. >> So to sync with Linux is what you're thinking up there? >> Yeah. >> Okay, so when you mean MP3 player with Linux not that it's based on Linux but that it's gonna play nice with the music collection on Linux box? >> Yeah. >> Okay, now just to start with the obvious choice. iTunes not in a Linux port, right? >> Yeah, you can run in under wine but I don't think it syncs when you do that. So, I would use Songbird which is available for Linux or there's a few other third party ways to manage an iPod. The Songbird is a syncing technology or a music library? >> The Songbird is iTune's replacement that will help you manage your music on the iPod Touch. Yeah, I'd probably be tempted to jailbreak it too. If you're using it on Linux it makes it a whole easier. The Arco 605 apparently widely reputed amongst Linux users as being something that works well with Linux. That's another way you could go if you don't wanna mess with the iPod universe in trying to get around all those Apple restrictions, you can go with the 605 WiFi and then there's a lot of great tutorials on how to sync your iPod Touch with Linux that I'll throw on the show notes. You can just do it. If you just do iPod Touch sync Linux, you'll find tons of people who are doing this out there if you decide to go that way 'cause the Arco's, while it has more features and is nicer to use on Linux, actually is a little more expensive and is a little bulkier. So, if you don't wanna go Arcos I'd say iPod Touch maybe your next bet. >> Okay, so there you go Alex. There's the way we'd go with it and you got one that's an insider favorite among the Linux crowd and one that requires a little elbow grease but that everyone else loves. Javier is in Argentina possibly, possibly our first call ever from Argentina. Javier, welcome to CNET live. >> Bienvenidos. >> Thanks for taking my call guys. >> Sure. >> Sure. >> So, basically I have 2 questions regarding Windows Vista. The first one is probably more simple. I just wanna know, have you guys started doing performance testing in regards to gaming on Windows 7 in comparison to how it works on Vista which they're crappie. Or, and that's basically my first question. The second one is how does X DOC [phonetic] work now? You know is it more OS X like? You know is it just for the switching and more of an area effect? It's not that you actually make an impact to your performance when you're using the computer and usability. Basically, your impressions on that, I wanted to know that. >> Yeah, I haven't--it's an interesting question about the gaming performance. We have not done any tests on that so keep an eye out for that as soon as we get a chance. We've got the laptop in house and we're coming up with every single way we can slice that thing up and try to shoot videos and write articles about it. So, keep an eye on Robert Vamosi's Windows 7 Guide at CNET.com and we'll pass along any videos right there at CNETTV.com as we get them. The performance of the DOC, I don't think makes a difference one way or another, other than they have that little menu system now that will pop up, which makes it a little quicker to get to certain operations within without having to do right-click, you know, and plow through menus. That's look like it might be a little more efficient. I have yet to actually use it in practice to find out for sure. They also at WinHack did a performance competition between boot up and shut down of Windows Vista and Windows 7 in trying to show that Windows 7 is much faster booting up and shutting down. It also has better memory management and better power management so they said, they're claiming they can get at least 11 percent better battery life. So, all signs point to Windows 7 being much better performance wise than the Windows Vista. >> So being with Vista should have been basically? >> Sorry, say that again. >> Vista should have been in many ways. >> Yeah! A lot of people are saying that. >> Okay. >> Essentially, they're fine tuning to Vista to make it better. >> And we got some Vista video coming up very shortly in the show. So, Javier, sit tight! >> Yeah, let's do it right now. Brian and I are gonna debate the future of video coming up. We think it may or may not lie with the new open source codec called Theora. But, first, let's answer more of Javier's questions with the sneak peak at the future of Windows with Windows 7, take a look. [ Background music ] >> I'm Robert Vamosi, senior editor, CNET. Today we're taking a first look at Windows 7 Ultimate build 68.01, a remarkably feature-rich and performance-stable alpha version of Microsoft's successor to Windows Vista. At first glance Windows 7 seems to be an enhanced, dare I say it, perfected version of Windows Vista. One that's geared more for the consumer with a lot more user interface enhancements. Indeed, Windows 7 builds on the internals of Windows Vista. Booting up and shutting down is much faster in Windows 7. The operating system consumes far fewer resources, so you probably won't need new hardware if your computer is already Vista compatible. Instead of being greeted by Vista's welcome center, users are taken to Windows Live Messenger Sign-In page. The Windows start icon is smaller in this build. But, functionally it's virtually the same as in Windows Vista. The Windows side bar from Windows Vista appears to be gone but the gadgets remain free to be placed on the desktop. The Windows Security Center for Windows XP SP2 appears to be gone as well, incorporated into the new action center section of the control panel. A new feature is the blue tooth file transfer wizard. There will be other blue tooth features in later builds of Windows 7, Microsoft says. A fan new feature is sticky notes which can be posted anywhere on the desktop or organized using a cork board-like application. Another fun feature is that any window dragged to the side of the desktop is instantly resized. Ribbons, a featured borrow from Office 2007, appears throughout Windows 7. Even the venerable applications like paint now sport a ribbon interface as does WordPad. Another important UI change from Windows Vista is the user account control. In Vista you could have this protection on or off. In Windows 7, there is a slider control between always notify and never notify enabling users to find a personal setting that fits their needs. Missing from this build is a new task bar at the bottom of Windows 7 desktop, which pops up thumbnails of open windows called the "jump list" as the user hovers over a particular open application. Windows 7 won't be in stores until at least 2010 which begs a question, should you even bother to upgrade to Windows Vista? If you're happy with Windows XP, I'd wait. Windows Vista is okay, but even in alpha, Windows 7 is a lot better operating system for the average consumer. We expect the beta sometime in early 2009, and who knows, based on user feedback we might even see Windows 7 on shelves Christmas of 2009. For CNET, I'm Robert Vamosi. >> [Inaudible] please, thank you. >> Okay. Javier, there is a look at Windows 7 and the latest from Robert Vamosi who's really been digging deep under the hood on that one. And speaking of digging under the hoods, something came out on Buzz Out Loud couple days ago on when I was in there with you guys, Tuesday. A new codec called Theora, a video codec. >> It's been around for a while but they finally had 1.0. That's the big deal. >> Okay, so it's in a full release now and the idea here is to give us finally a codec that gets into the simplicity we always enjoyed with MP3. I mean MP3 was so simple. Take your music, turn it in to MP3. Everybody can play it, everybody can encode if it's an encode platform. >> Yeah, even though MP3 was a proprietary format it got treated as if it was open. >> Yeah, because it was so early in technology history. I think the Fraunhofer lab didn't get front of it and lock it down. >> And even so, now we have LAME the MP3 encoder which allows you to encode MP3's widely and they pay the license fee on that. So, MP3 has essentially done what open formats can do. That's what we're wondering with Theora here, that's our debate. Could Theora provide that same thing for video 'cause right now there is no MP3 of video-- >> No! >> And this is what was causing the Apple TV problem that we we're talking about earlier in the show which is well, I wanna HandBrake my DVD's but what format should I do it to 'cause if I do it to dot-mov with an H.264 codec then I could use it on Apple TV but I don't really like that codec. I wanna use X Vid or I wanna use this. >> And everyone's in different can't. So you can't say what's the--do it once play all codec in video. There isn't an answer there. >> Apple's trying to push H.264. [ Simultaneous talking ] >> Yeah, but it's not there. >> One of the reasons some people think they have an enabled flash because that's another way to do streaming video is do it in flash because it doesn't matter what the codec is on the end. >> Right. But the problem is we're looking at 2 levels. So you've got the encapsulation which is either MOV or WMV and then you've got the codec which is where Theora plays. This is the way that the video is coded down to have loss but obviously keep the fidelity as high as possible. You gotta piece of it playing. >> Yeah, I mean it can be used for download. It can be used for streaming. This is TV Majorca actually right here where they're streaming the Theora codec. So it looks good. >> Looks good. >> Look like any other video codec. It's free and open source. >> That's not the issue. >> That's the key. >> Yeah, they have good--there's good quality codecs already. >> Is that enough to allow everyone to use it without any kind of licensing restrictions and make it popular? Or they're still gonna have Microsoft and Apple holding on to their WMV's? >> Two words. >> Yeah. >> Ogg Vorbis never caught on. >> Yeah, but that's because MP3 existed. There is no MP3 video though. >> MP3 was hot by the time Ogg came along. >> Yeah. >> And Windows audio was also doing pretty well at that point and then Apple comes along with AAC. So you did have 3 to clobber it out but I don't know that without Microsoft and Apple embracing this, and I mean both of them, not just one, that this is going to become anything more than a side bar codec. >> Well, you've got a lot of other folks in there like Bleep are already supporting it. >> Yeah. >> If a lot of those kind of Vimeos, the places like that, maybe that would be a way to wedge themselves in. >> Maybe. >> But you're gonna have to force those two you're talking about to accept this codec from the outside. >> Yeah, at least to accept it, if not go exclusively to it which is not just gonna go. >> 'Cause with MP3, Apple was always pushing AAC as the audio format and still are, but they have to allow MP3 full play. >> But eventually rolled it MP3. Yeah. >> Alright. Time to a quick break but we'll be back with the Best of the Web. Stay with us. ^M00:16:59 [ Music ] ^M00:17:20 [ Background music ] >> Hey everyone, I'm Molly Wood, host of CNET TV's Mail Bag. Here at the Mail Bag, we love to read your letters and emails, the lover mail, even the hater mail and apparently, you like it too 'cause when we try to make the show biweekly, boy, did you raise the seats. So we're back to every week and you can all just calm down. But don't stop writing in 'cause I need you bad. Look for the new edition of Mail Bag every Wednesday at CNETTV.com. [ Music ] >> Welcome back to CNET Live. Tom Merritt, Brian Cooley, taking your calls and answering your questions. We've got 3 lines open, and Christine has 3 ears. >> So call her now and fill two of the three. >> 888-900-2638, 888-900-CNET, that is the number. Give us a call and you can get on the show. >> Where is the third? >> That's like the third eye. It's the pineal ear. >> That's right. Right there. >> It shows up right here. >> Alright. While you're figuring out where the third ear is, let's check out the Best of the Web. [ Background music ] >> Alright folks. Best of the Web is brought to you by CNET's Webware.com and this week, I'm going to those of you who know how to read and write music. The rest of you can go get a coke or something. So this is a service, a web service called Noteflight. It's an in-browser composition tool. Now, that's different than most software out there you've used to write music and sequence it which is always a proprietary app that's connected to the hardware you're using but this is strictly an in-browser experience and composers like Dr. Tom Merritt who's written-- >> Oh I'm sorry. I thought you said I could go get a coke. Ah yeah. >> So check it out. You go to the actual Noteflight interface. You can hear it on your machine. >> Yeah. [ Music playing ] >> You can do all the various notations that musicians want, all the different notes, all the various ways of connecting 'em, the different timings, the way you set up your measures, but the real interesting thing here, aside from being a purely web-based comp tool and of course, you can hear what you're doing as you drag notes in there, is you can share it in all kinds of ways within the Noteflight system. So people can come together and collaborate on the composition, save the inversions, roll back a version 'cause some dumb head like me put a flat where there should be a sharp or something like that and it's really quite innovative. Now, it makes me wish I knew how to write music. >> A whole new route for the RIAA to come in and sue you. >> That's right. This could open up a whole new area. >> You think you were just putting My Sweet Lord and suddenly you've got a DMCA and take down [inaudible]. >> I haven't thought of that. Wow. Always something good from Tom to throw a little bit of a dark cloud over my sunny future. >> I'm just mad 'cause I can't write music. >> Well, I can't either. >> Yeah. >> So we're both [inaudible] how to do something with this. Alright. Let's get back to your calls at 888-900-CNET, 888-900-2638. Two lines open right now by the way. There's an opportunity for you. Let's go talk to Michael. He's in New York with a hard drive problem that is vexing us a bit too. Michael what's going on? >> Hey Tom and Brian squared, love the show, love all things CNET and thanks for that Best of the Web I'm now gonna have the Super Mario Brothers playing the whole day. >> You're not alone. >> Here is my situation I have 2 serial ATA hard drives and I'm installing a brand new system, this PC is going to be used for some light video editing for my parents are kinda giving 'em an upgrade. So, I'm trying to install these 2 drives, one is a 250 gig, the other's a 500 gig, using one as a program drive and the other is like a data drive and a scratch drive for the video editing and all that. When I get it all set up, I go in and I look and I find it's only recognizing about 130 gigs of each drive in Windows XP, not the full capacity of each drive. And it just kinda had me perplexed-- >> Yeah! 130. >> 130 is not the number we were looking for. We're hoping you're gonna say 68. >> This is Windows right? >> XP, yeah! >> Window's XP. >> And are you formatting or have you formatted these drives in NTFS or FAT32? >> This is NTFS. >> Alright, so that takes that off the plate. >> Have you gotten to your BIOS during booth and made sure that anything there that's going to specify what kind of drives they are is correct? >> I checked it out and I have everything kind of set on auto when-- >> Yeah, right. >> And it's recognizing the entire capacity of the drive in the BIOS which is what made me so confused. >> Now that is odd. Okay, and then you get into Windows. Have you gone in to a console called the computer management console that is compmgmt.msc? >> I have looked at that. It's where it manages all the different drives, correct? >> Yeah, you go in to storage, you look at your drives and you can see whether they are, how they're partitioned, if they're "healthy" as Windows calls them and any other issues, have you gone in there? >> I have. >> Hmm and everything looks? >> It shows them as healthy drives but again only at 130 gigs. >> So, in comp--in the computer management console it still reports the size as too small. >> As too small, correct. >> Alright, what do you think? I'm out of ideas. >> Yeah, yeah you covered everything I would have thought off. BT you don't have anything extra to throw in there. >> No, no I can't throw anything else on that guys, I'm sorry. >> Did you? What's the history of these drives? Are these new drives, fresh drives, or did they come of a previous use? >> No, they are brand new drives. >> And did you run the little set up app that came with them from Western Digital or Seagate or whoever? >> No, those are not included. It was just the drives, kind of like OEM just-- >> Yeah, just bare drives in the box. All I can think Michael is that you might wanna go, what brand are they? >> There are both Seagates. >> Okay, Seagate. So I would go to Seagate's site and look for the utility that normally is bundled in there on a CD-ROM, go download it and I'm going Hail Mary here but run that as the initial set up which means you're gonna burn the drive down and do a partition with their software. I don't know what else to reach for here. This one's very frustrating. And then, bring the system back up into Windows, do the partition in the management console format. I assume you've done all that stuff, you've jiggled the format, you've jiggled the partition, you formatted the drives in XP, all of that. >> I have. Yeah, I actually started with the XP setup disk just doing in right, you know, right fresh. >> Yeah, you've done-- >> And even right there is where I run in to an issue. It said only 130 gigs. It was really strange. >> That's really strange. >> Yeah. I--most of the stuff that I'm finding other people who've ran in to the same problems is they just look for file system corruptions, you know, problems with the disks but it's weird that you would have problems with 2 disk at the same time. So I feel like that's not it. >> Very weird. >> Let me try one more thing. I've got something in here. How old is your actual PC? >> The computer is--all the hardware that I'm working with is just recently purchased within the last week, all brand new. >> 'Cause the only thread I'm finding of a person with 250 gig that would only detect as 130, they had to update the BIOS but you've got a fresh machine which doesn't make sense. >> And the BIOS is identifying all the gigs. >> It is. >> Right! >> It is seeing all the gigs. >> That makes no sense. >> I did download the BIOS flash just to on the safe side. That was probably gonna be my next step. >> You've done everything? At this point, wow, I'm running out of ideas. We're gonna send you over to the CNET forums where you will get the power of more and better minds than ours to help you solve this one out. You've done everything. You've done absolutely everything that I and we can think of. >> Yes, if anybody out there finds an answer give as an email, CNET Live at CNET.com and let us know. We'll keep plugging away out it too and see if we could pick of anything. But you've got exhausted most of the objects that we could think of. >> He's done everything. >> And it looks like people out there that have the same problem are running up against the walls as well. So we'll keep working on it for you. Martin wrote in to CNET Live at CNET.com and said, is there anyway way I can control my iTunes with the remote application while my computer streams on my network the music that iTunes is playing, so that my receiver can play my music just like internet radio? Well yes, as a matter of fact, there is a way to do that. John Falcone shows you how in today's Insider's Secret. >> Everyone knows that the Apple iPhone and iPod Touch are great portable music players but they can also double as remote controls for playing music on your home stereo. I'm John Falcone from CNET and I'll show you how it's done on this Insider's Secret. ^M00:25:24 [ Music ] ^M00:25:35 >> Products like the Sonos Digital Music System and the Logitech Squeeze Box both use an iPod-like remote control to access your computer's digital music collection over your home network and play that music through the big speakers of your home stereo system. But anyone with an iPhone or an iPod Touch can set up a similar PC to stereo network music system and use their Apple handheld as a wireless remote control to access any iTunes based audio. The setup can be as simple or elaborate as you'd like. It just depends on how many of the components you already own and how many additional ones you want to add to your existing set up. For starters, you need at least one music source. You can use the iTunes library on any Windows PC or Mac or the songs you've transferred to an Apple TV. If you're just listening on your PC speakers or those connected to your Apple TV, then you're ready to move on. But if you wanna stream music through additional rooms in your home, you'll want to invest in an Apple Airport Express. It's a wireless networking box that can double as a router, wireless access point, wireless bridge, a print server, or any combination thereof. But it's got one more special feature. It can also play your iTunes music over your home network. Once you got one of those components, the computer-running iTunes and Apple TV or an Apple Airport Express up and running in every room where you want to listen to music, you're almost done. Each of them should now show up as an Air Tune speaker on your iTunes desktop. That means you can stream your iTunes music to any of those rooms in the house, either one at a time or simultaneously. Just click on the speaker icon at the bottom right hand of the iTunes window and check off where you wanna listen. But you don't wanna run back to your computer screen whenever you wanna switch songs or play list. It's much more convenient to use your iPod to control the action instead. Now, this works equally well with an iPhone or as we have here, an iPod Touch. First, connect the handheld to your WiFi network. Then go to the App Store and search for Remote. Once you've downloaded and installed it, it's completely free, fire it up. To control the computer-running iTunes, choose Add Library. A 4-digit code will be displayed. At that point, head over to your computer screen, open iTunes and you should notice the iPod showing up in the devices section of the left hand nav. Click on it. Type the same 4-digit pass code and you should get a confirmation message that your remote is now able to control iTunes. At that point, it's off to the races. Your iPod should be able to navigate through your PC's entire iTunes collection. The remote app works with both multiple sources and multiple destinations. You can toggle between iTunes libraries on multiple PCs and multiple Apple TVs using the Choose Library function on the remote setting screen. That music can be played on any Air Tunes speaker as well. It uses the same sort of menu found on iTunes. There are limitations to this setup of course. You can only stream your choice of music to multiple rooms simultaneously but you can't use the iPod to send different choices to different rooms and you can't send any audio from the iPod itself. Only music that's already on the PC or the Apple TV will work. Apple says the theoretical limit of the system is 16 total components and each one you add will zap some of your network's bandwidth. That said, most of us are probably only gonna be looking for systems that covers 2 to 4 rooms and this is an all-Apple solution that's the only one guaranteed with music purchase from the iTune Store. That's it for this Insider's Secret. I'm John Falcone from CNET, see you next time. >> Okay. We could not let it go and we think we have found the solution. Both Brian and I found references to 48-bit LDA support in the hard drive that allows you to go over 137 gigabytes. >> Hmm. >> We've got a link to a Microsoft Support article and a registry key that Brian found that should allow our caller to be able to get the whole drive recognized. We'll put that in the show notes at blog.cnettv.com. >> By the way, we found hundreds of people having your same problem, Michael I think it was, so don't sweat it. Let's go to our last calls in. We've got 2 to get through lightning round. Here we go line 1 Gary in New York. Gary welcome to CNET Live, what's on your mind? >> Hi Tom, hi Brian, I was just wondering--I was watching the Buzz Report and Molly Wood always says how Google's gonna take over and with the release of the Android operating system, I was wondering if they're gonna release a computer based like Mac OS X or Windows? >> In a sense they've already done it. They already are an operating system if you think about it. I mean the internet is kind of the core layer that you would think of as the colonel of a sense and then you've got apps built on that, you got all the services, you've got a networking technology in of the fact that their services all tie together and of course to every other. So in a way, I think Google is already at that dreaded level. >> In other words no. >> Right. No, but they already are so it's kind of a strange-- >> They're doing it in the cloud. They're not gonna do it there. >> Yeah, they're doing it in the cloud. Don't look for any kind of boxed software from them by any stretch and let's get to our last call, Jacob in California. Jacob you're the last call today on CNET Live. >> Hey guys how are you doing? >> Good. >> I'm looking in to get a Mac, I've never even touched one before but my brother has one, the new iMac, the big 20 plus inch screen and I wanna know is it even viable if I've been using XP, you know do they roll advantage to only one besides how cool it looks or-- >> Isn't that really what it gets down to 'cause we just drop all the crap in the tech industry and say look it's either cool or you go buy Windows. >> Does the price matter to you? >> No, not really. >> Alright, then get a Mac. >> Yeah. >> 'Cause then you can go buy Windows Vista or Windows XP or Windows 7 and put it on there. You can run Ubuntu on it. You can have a whole lot of fun with it. >> Yeah. >> You can't really, you can run OS X on Windows machines but-- >> You can on OS X on Windows. >> And virtually you could virtualize it sometimes. It's a real pain in the neck. >> Yeah, the only really-- >> For flexibility, I like the Mac. For bargain, I like the PC. >> Exactly, that's how it breaks down and for just deliciously nice hardware to hold in your hand that's when you go Apple. If you want any old piece of plastic junk you go buy a Windows machine. Okay, I think we're good. >> Yeah, that's all time we have for this week but you can send us your videos. Remember record them any old way, use streamer or something and save it then send us the link and we will put it on the show. cnetlive@cnet.com is the email address. >> And don't forget we open the phones early folks, 30 minutes before the show starts at 888-900-CNET so call early next week at 12:30 p.m. Pacific and the show then starts up at 1 o'clock Pacific. >> But 4 p.m. Eastern 'cause that's where most of the people are. >> That's right and-- >> And now 11 a.m. Hawaiian. >> That's what I'm talking about. >> You know. Alright. >> We'll see you guys next week. ^M00:32:50 [ Music ]

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