CNET Live: February 26, 2009
30:14

CNET Live: February 26, 2009

Culture
[ Music ] ^M00:00:09 >> Coming up on CNET Live, Brian Tong is dancing with the stars. >> Plus, it's gonna be titillating. The Kindle strips down to its little silicon shorts. >> Well, my you're big on -- >> And your calls and video questions. CNET Live starts now. >> Hoo. ^M00:00:24 [ Music ] ^M00:00:30 >> That was the Kindle, not either of us. >> Yeah. Good grief, I'm glad he clarified that. Hello everybody, it's CNET Live. You know that by now because the Jolly Neapolitans are off and running. >> And you clicked on the little link that said "CNET Live." >> That, too. I'm Brian Cooley. He's Tom Merritt. And of course, he is Brian Tong. >> What's up, boys? How you doing? >> How you doing BT? >> Yeah, we're good. >> I'm good. I'm good. I'm good. >> How was your dancing? >> My -- I'm still, you know, I'm still fit, shape, I'm sweating from it. >> Sit tight, folks. This is gonna get only more interesting, trust us. Before we get into all of that dancing around with BT and his special guest, let's talk about what the show's all about. We're here to take your calls at 888-900-CNET, 888-900-2638. >> Yes, but first, it's time for things we crave. ^M00:01:11 [ Music ] ^M00:01:16 These are some of our favorite things from the Crave blog. You can get to the Crave blog, just type crave.cnet.com into the address bar of your web browser. You know, the browser's 18 years old today. >> Is it really? >> Yeah, Tim Berners-Lee invented it -- >> 1990? >> -- 18 years ago. Or unleashed, I guess. He invented it before that. >> Unleashed it. Right. >> But he released it 18 years ago. >> Well, happy birthday, browser. >> Yeah. >> Where we would be without you? >> [Inaudible] Buzz Out Loud. That's the only reason I know that. >> I'll be durned. Okay. >> Anyway, in my browser right now is a naked Kindle. >> Huh uh. >> Oh my gosh. >> Cover that up. >> Somebody needs to go get my Kindle 2 -- >> How about that part? >> -- and bring it close to me -- >> Especially right there. >> Because I don't have it with me, and I feel afraid for it. No, this is great. >> Yes. >> iFixit did this. Eric Franklin pointing to them. They went through and took a Kindle 2 and sacrificed it to the gods. Actually, I think it probably worked once they got it back together. >> Oh, yeah. >> Because these guys know what they're doing. >> Yeah. >> And -- open it up. So if you're into this kind of thing -- >> Yeah. >> -- where you like to see where the battery is, where the chips are. >> I like [inaudible], yeah. >> What kind of board is in there, what all is going on. Take a look at this. It's an excellent little pictorial. >> Huh. Very good. Okay. I'm loving -- because I'm kind of fetishist about audio recorders, nice high quality, portable, digital ones. This one is actually a cradle from Alesis. You dock your iPod Touch, let's say, into this. And it adds great controls, metering, a very nicely set up single point stereo -- well, a two point stereo mike, but it's two separate modules into a single enclosure on the top there. This is for the folks who have been looking at these portable digital recorders from Sony and Morance [phonetic] and all these guys and saying well, I don't need a dedicated one to take up three or four hundred bucks of my cash, but I've got an iPod touch. What if I get this thing to go around it? And this is really audio gear. This is not an iPod accessory. This is a different kind of company. This isn't Geffen, you know? >> I've used this kind of thing before. In fact, Veronica and I recorded Sword and Laser at the new media expo with the same kind of thing. >> Yeah. >> Using an iPod. It worked really well, but it wasn't nearly as slick looking as this. >> Not pro-quality like this. >> And Alesis, they make the mixing board that I use for my home podcasting. >> Oh, yeah. >> A fantastic company. So -- >> It's a real audio company. >> -- it probably is a really good sound that you're gonna get. >> Right, it should sound well. The price isn't super cheap, $300.00. But I hear $200.00 street. So it's worth looking at. Let's get off to a cool video question first, right? >> Yeah. Time for your questions soon. Our video question, first, comes from Naved [assumed spelling], coming to us from the Republic of Malta. >> Hi. I use an additional screen with my MacBook for an extended desktop, which is loaded with Mac OSX 10.5. I have a habit of playing video podcasts in one screen, and some other works on the second one. While working, especially [inaudible] between my spaces, so I want one of my spaces to be anchored to my external screen while I switch between the other spaces and the laptop screen. >> That would be nice. In fact, we sicced Brian Tong on this to see if anybody could possibly do it. Brian? >> Yeah, Naved, so first of all, the quick answer is unfortunately, no. And what he's really trying to do is he has a MacBook screen, and it's connected to an external desktop. And with Spaces -- Tom, if you kind of show it off -- spaces essentially, if you have one screen, it can give you essentially four screens where you can assign specific applications to different spaces. And then you can switch in between them. So some people put their Internet browser email on one space, and then their video editing or something else like that on another space. So Naved wants to lock down his external monitor on one screen and then still switch between spaces on his laptop. But it just can't happen. It's just the way that they built it. And unfortunately -- I've talked to my Mac geniuses. We've looked for even hacks to do it. There's nothing out there to help with your problem right now. So there you go. >> All right. That's disappointing. >> Yeah, I mean I actually looked -- I'll put a couple links in the show notes to -- there's a good wrap-up that was done on the Apple blog of different alternatives to spaces, but from what I could tell, even none of the alternatives will do this either. So hey, call out to the developers, if anybody could figure it out, that's something some people want. >> Okay. Let's go to the phone calls at 888-900-cnet. 888-900-2638. Starting off this afternoon with Nathan, he's in Pennsylvania. He's looking for a computer. How more basic could that be? Nathan, throw us a curve ball, though. >> Yeah, I just wanted to first off start by saying I'm kind of sorry for calling. I just have a lot of questions. And -- >> We love your questions. >> And I also, like, you know, want to get the right computer that's not gonna be a piece of junk when I get it. >> That's why we're here. So what are you looking for? >> Any -- no matter what, I want Leopard on it. I mean either like a Windows machine that I can put it on, or a Mac. >> Okay. >> And a laptop. >> Yeah, well -- >> I knew there'd be a curve ball in there somewhere. >> Yeah, for easiness, your gonna want to buy a MacBook. >> Yeah. >> Because then you get Leopard. And it's easier to take Windows and put it on there. You can put a boon tune, all that with Boot Camp or download some kind of virtualization like OpenBOX.net, and do some virtualization that way. But if you're up to the challenge, Leo for All is a project that's kind of picking up where the OSX 86 project left off. Thanks to Exatica [assumed spelling] by the way, for sending this along. Leo for All is coming out -- let me see if I can find their countdown -- two days, 21 hours, 53 minutes from the recording of this episode at Leoforall.com. And it's already out there, actually in beta if you want to try it out. It allows you to easily put OS10 onto a non-Mac computer and keep it updated. >> Yeah. I, myself though, I was -- you know, I can't -- I'm visually impaired, and I was looking at -- you know, like a bigger screen, like the 15-inch pro. >> Yeah, like the MacBook Pro? >> Like, which one do you have? >> I have the MacBook Pro, and the only reason I do that is because I actually want to have the video card for doing stuff like this show. And I like to have a little bit of the bigger hard drive space. >> Yeah. >> But what you can do with a MacBook, because it's a lot cheaper, and it just doesn't have the -- really, the -- what is it, the video card? There's kind of one other main difference. It's not that big of a deal for most people. You can put a larger hard drive in there yourself. In fact, they're a lot cheaper if you order the minimum specs from Apple, and then buy extra RAM and a bigger hard drive yourself. >> Hmm. >> But wouldn't that void your warranty though? >> No, replacing RAM and hard drive won't void your warranty at all. >> Accepted upgrade. >> Yeah. And in fact, if you buy the 15-inch MacBook Pro, for instance, you can pull off the back part of the unibody and easily get at the hard drive. If you buy the 17-inch MacBook Pro, that's gonna have a unibody that you can't get at the battery, so you definitely want to stay away from that. >> Oh, good point. >> But I'd probably go for MacBook, not MacBook Pro, just to save the money. >> All right, so Nation, we're thinking you should go for a MacBook on this one, unless you got a convincing reason to try and wedge, you know, OSX onto an IBM machine, or a PC machine. Let's -- >> And we should point out that that Leo for All is not necessarily -- >> Not kosher. >> -- legally -- >> Right. >> -- clear. I -- I -- it's a gray area. >> It's out there. We're just throwing that in your direction. Let's stay on the Apple tip here and go to Steven in New York. Question about moving iPod content around on more than one machine. Hello Steven. What are you trying to do? >> Hi, my laptop kind of died a little bit ago. >> Yeah. >> And I was able to recover my hard drives and everything. And all that information is intact. But I -- before I realized my laptop died, I bought a new app for my iPod Touch on my iPod Touch. I was wondering if I could synch my iPod to another computer without erasing that app? >> Hmm, what's the word on that, guys? >> Ah, well, there's a couple of ways you could do this. Molly Wood actually has a video that'll show you. We'll throw that in the show notes, about how to synch an iPod with two computers. Essentially what you have to do is you go in, and you find a couple of identifications in some files in the iTunes directory. And then you copy those over to the other computer so that when you plug in the iPod, it thinks that it's on the same computer, and it doesn't prompt you to overwrite everything. You could also just turn off automatic synching if you don't want to go to all that trouble and then manually drag files back and forth on the other computer. That's another way to take care of it. >> So one of those should -- >> Is there any way to enable the automatic synching without a computer to plug it in? Because I wasn't able to do that before my computer crashed. >> Without the what? Without the computer --? >> Without plugging the iPod into the computer? >> Automatic synching without plugging the iPod into the computer? >> Are you saying -- are you asking if you can actually do it through a setting on the phone or the iPod Touch itself? >> Oh, I see. I see. >> No. I'm asking if -- you're saying that I would require automatic synching to be turned off in order to do this? >> In order to do the, like, drag and drop. In other words, I'll put the link in the show notes to the video that shows you the whole process to make it so you can just plug it in and not worry about it. And you can have automatic synching on. But if you didn't want to go to all that trouble, you'd have to turn the automatic synching off on the iPod to get it to mount as a hard drive. And you can actually do that if you plug it into a different computer, and it says do you want to synch? And you -- this is a different computer -- say no. And then you can usually go in and turn it off to mount as a drive, and go it back and forth that way, or close iTunes. And then just drag the stuff on that way. >> All right, Steven. Let's get a quick on here from Nick in Massachusetts, question about drive interfaces. Hey Nick, welcome to CNET Live. >> Hey guys. >> What's on your mind? >> Well, I have a Gateway laptop MX 6426. And it has an 80-gigabyte hard drive in it, and it runs at 4,200 rpm. And it -- PATA -- P-A-T-A. >> Yeah. >> And would I be able to put in a SATA hard drive? >> Not if your laptop is a standard ATA, or that used to be called in IDE interface, because there's no place that I know of -- I don't know your machine specifically -- where you could add a SATA controller because you have to have a different controller on the motherboard, or a separate card, that will recognize a SATA drive, which I don't believe your machine does, unless you happen to have an eSATA --I don't know how you -- how your new your machine is -- an eSATA external SATA connector. That's the other way to add a drive. Of course, it wouldn't be internal. It would be something tethered to your machine. >> Is it a laptop or a desktop? >> He said it's a laptop. >> Hmm. >> It's a two-year old laptop. >> Yeah, you're not gonna have eSATA on that, and you can't just stick a SATA drive in a machine that doesn't have a SATA interface. If you have one drive in there now, and it's a parallel ATA, that's all that machine's gonna recognize. >> Yeah, I think the "P" is. It's -- "P" is parallel and serial. >> Right. >> So you got two different ways of sending that data over. >> Parallel's the old-fashion 40 wire, big, wide, gray ribbon cable. And the parallel AT -- or the SATA A -- serial ATAs are just the four conductor, little narrow cable in various colors. It's a faster interface. It's a simpler, smaller cable. It allows hot swapping, which parallel ATA never did. Lots of benefits, but for you, I think you're stuck where you are. You have to either upgrade your machine, or look into some kind of an external drive that will use whatever ports you've got on that machine, okay? Thanks, Nick. >> All right, coming up, BT is going to tell us about his encounter with Steve Wozniak, the founder of the Apple computer. Well, no. He's the creator of the Apple computer. There'd be no Apple computer without this guy. >> There'd be no Apples without that guy. >> And he's -- he's prepping for "Dancing with the Stars." >> Yeah. >> But first, Amazon starting shipping its newest version of the Kindle eReader earlier this week, and Natali Del Conte has been putting it through its paces. ^M00:12:05 >> Hi, I'm Natali Del Conte, and this is a product spotlight on the Amazon Kindle 2. ^M00:12:10 [ Music ] ^M00:12:17 This was announced in February, and it started shipping on the 24th. It's significantly thinner than the original version. Amazon is claiming that it's thinner than any 3G phone on the market. It's not a 3G phone, but it is a 3G device. Amazon claims that it can download books in under 90 seconds, and that has been my experience so far. I downloaded two books when I received the Kindle, and it was shocking how fast it was. I do like the form factor a lot. It is convenient that the buttons are smaller and more strategically placed so that you don't accidentally change a page as often as you did on the first version. I'm still not sure about the joystick, though. The old controller was a scroll wheel that you moved up and down on the screen. It didn't require quite as much precision as this smaller, square controller. They've changed the location of the power button from behind the device to on top of it. Also, there's no button to turn the wireless feature off like there was on the old Kindle. You have to do that by navigating through the menu. The whisper sync function lets you share books between your different Kindles, if you have more than one. You manage that on Amazon's website, where it keeps track of all the books that you've purchased. You just go to the book and choose which device you want to read it on. It's super simple. Each Kindle has its own email address. This is how you send documents to the device. Only approved users can send documents to the device. This helps to avoid any spam. You can set an approved email address on Amazon's website under the "Manage your Kindle" page. The onboard dictionary is easier to use than it was on the original version. You just mouse over a word, and it automatically pops up the definition in the lower part of the screen. I also like the highlight function a lot because you can grab specific sentences easier than lines of text. I do find the page turning to be a lot faster than the previous model. I also like the screen resolution and the form factor of this Kindle. I tested out the text-to-speech function, and it was pretty much what we expected, choppy and unnatural. But otherwise sufficient if you want to use it as a secondary reading tool. This Kindle does not have an expandable card slot like the original one, so you only get two gigs of memory that it comes with. I'm also not thrilled about the fact that the new Kindle doesn't come with a case. This case is an extra $30.00, while the original Kindle shipped with its own leather case for free. I don't recommend throwing this around your bag or your man purse without a case, so factor in an extra $30.00 into the price of the device. The Amazon Kindle 2 is $359.00. It doesn't come with any free books, but the books average about $9.99 per download. And of course, the 3G wireless service is free. You can buy it online at Amazon, of course. That's all for your Product Spotlight. I'm Natali Del Conte with CNET News, and this was your in-depth look at the Amazon Kindle 2. ^M00:14:54 [ Music ] ^M00:14:56 >> All right, sporty boy, you got one right there. What do you think? >> I think that it's really funny that this thing doesn't know how to pronounce Jeff Bezos' name. >> Now what's the point of the text-to-speech? >> The text-to-speech? It's kind of cool. You want me to -- you want me to show it off here. >> Yeah, let's do it. >> Let me get in the -- you have to -- it's kind of hard to get to. You go to the menu, and you go down to this menu option that starts text-to-speech, and it just starts talking to you. >> -- wireless device, and instead be transporting into that [inaudible] round readers love, where the outside world dissolves -- >> It's kind of Stephen Hawking. >> -- leaving only the author's stories, words, and ideas. >> Not bad. >> Yeah. >> It's not a breakthrough, but it's not bad. >> It's so much sexier looking though. >> What's the scenario behind using the -- >> It's so much better. >> Jeff Bezos. >> Bezos. >> Bezos. >> So anyway, I'm sorry. [ Crosstalk ] I just love the way it says Jeff Bezos. >> This creates an ebook out of anything? Or an e -- I mean an audio book out of anything. >> Yeah, any text. >> That's the idea. >> It's just text-to-speech. >> Yeah. >> So you pull up any -- it's -- >> Display looks really good. >> Obviously, all the stuff that she was talking about, the differences. The display looks smaller, too, if you compare it to the original Kindle's screen. >> Oh yeah, because it's just -- is it just a trick of the bezzlery [phonetic]? >> Yeah, because they have this nice, wide light around. >> Yeah. >> It really makes it look like it's tinier. >> It's really good, though. I mean that 16 grayscale looks really nice. >> Yeah, and I think it's probably a little faster with the page turns and everything. >> Yeah. >> It seemed like it was slow opening the books at first, but I think that's because it actually didn't have them on. It had automatically synched to my account, and when I pulled up a book -- >> Oh. >> -- it was pulling it down over the whisper net on demand because when I go back to open them up later, then it's pretty fast. >> Looks really good. >> Yeah. >> I mean it looks really good, you know? Not a revolutionary breakthrough, but a -- >> This keyboard is just -- nah. >> You're not in on it. Okay? >> No. >> I mean, it's really -- it should be Kindle 1.1, though, shouldn't it? I mean it's not a breakthrough from the previous device. It's just a dramatic evolution from it. >> I --even though I did it, I probably wouldn't replace my original Kindle with this. >> Yeah. >> But it's probably going to be a lot nicer for some people how might not have wanted it in the first place. >> Yeah. If you're -- >> For instance, my wife -- I said, "Hey, you could have my old Kindle." She's like, "No. I want that one." >> No. Of course. >> "I want your new one." >> Let's get to some more calls here. I want to jump over to a system question here that -- it regards backup. It's like flossing. Let's make sure you're doing it, folks. Let's go to Theresa. She's in Irvine. Hey, Theresa, welcome to CNET Live. >> Hi. Brians and Tom. I've got -- it seems like I'm always calling with a question that's closing the barn door after the horses escape. >> Oh no, what'd you do? >> Now, I know, and I use, Amazon S3. And we've got Time Capsule and all kinds of stuff, but what I really need is a no brainer, cheap, backup system for a college student's notebook that will actually work. >> So backup to external drive or to a cloud service? Either one? >> Yeah, I mean you could use Time Machine to backup to an external drive. >> What would you recommend, a host service or a device? >> I use a service because that way if that drive's not around and I need a file off there because something got corrupted -- >> Yeah. >> -- I can just go get it. >> Yeah. >> I use Jungle Disk. And I'll actually, probably want to show them off as a download of the week one of these days. But Jungle disk has a service that uses Amazon's S3 as their backing. >> Okay. >> I talked about this a little bit on Real Deal. It's in an Insider's Secret that I did on backing up. And it's 15 cents a gigabyte. So for somebody who's not got a lot of data -- probably a student doesn't have a ton of data yet. >> Yeah. >> Maybe a lot of music or videos, though, so you've got to watch what gets back upped. >> Yeah, there's pictures and video involved. >> Yeah. So how many gigabytes we talking here, do you think? >> Probably -- let's see. She's got a -- what is the MacBook? She's probably got -- I don't know, maybe 60, 70. >> 60 gigabytes. Full? Or how -- or a 60-gigabyte capacity? >> No, of actual data. >> Of actual data. >> [Inaudible] in her computer. >> So that's too much for MobileMe because MobileMe maxes out at 60 gigabytes. That's like the most you can get, so you can't even back up the whole drive. >> Well, you got to be judicious. >> Yeah, I want -- I want one step. >> Being judicious -- >> Let me -- let me -- >> -- how much of that needs to be backed up? That's the key about setting up a backup is to be judicious about it, especially with an online service that's costing you money, and taking its fair amount of time to go over the network on what may be a pokey uplink because those are always slower than your downlink, depending what network she's on. >> Cooley's right about the cost. I mean the cheapest way is gonna be some kind of network attached storage -- >> Yeah. >> -- or direct storage where you can use the Apple OSX back up system to get to the external drive. >> Yeah, builds in. >> And just regularly plug it in. But you have to remember to do that. What I like about Jungle Disk is it goes and looks at everything you tell it to back up and sees if anything has changed. And at a time that you schedule, or at an interval that you schedule -- >> Yeah. >> -- it updates it. And so -- >> That's called an incremental backup. And that's the most efficient. >> It can be essentially in real time, or it can be once a night. >> Right. >> And you don't have to think about it. It just happens. >> Yeah, I think here problem was I taught her how to super duper a disk image onto an external drive, and that took a long time. And also, it was -- she had to think about plugging the external disk in. Maybe that's the solution is just -- I'll have to set her up, but S3 Jungle Disk sounds like it. >> Brian Tong's got an idea for you, too. >> I would say, Theresa, really, it's a free application. It's Carbon Copy Cloner. You literally just say, copy my hard drive. Point it to another hard drive and press "clone." And it copies every file for file. And it's free, and that's what I always use. I run it maybe once a month. And it's probably the best and the easiest solution since you don't -- she probably doesn't want to mess with settings and specific files. That's what I would recommend. So you should -- I would you that way. >> Yeah, that's the -- >> Okay. Free is good. Yes. >> That's the easiest way to go is go with a complete image backup like that, but it's going to be the chunkiest and not gonna be -- you know, really amenable to an online service because your sending everything up, and that's gonna be huge and keep getting bigger. That's the downside there. >> That's something to watch out for. So -- >> Backup's never that easy. >> Watch the backing up Insider's Secret if you haven't already. Because they'll kind of give you a feel for how these different things work. >> Oh, good. Yeah. >> Time to take a quick break, but we will be back, and Brian Tong will be dancing with the creator of the Apple. The Woz. ^M00:20:27 [ Music ] ^M00:20:31 >> Watch every game from the NCAA Championship live online for free with NCAA March Madness on Demand. But please, use with caution. ^M00:20:41 [ Music ] ^M00:20:57 >> When the biggest stars need the biggest laughs, they come to Dave. ^M00:21:04 [ Laughter ] ^M00:21:07 The Late Show with David Letterman. >> Why are we laughing? >> I'm not sure. >> Weeknights on CBS. ^M00:21:12 [ Music ] ^M00:21:16 >> Okay. Here we are, back in the game. >> Hey, welcome back to CNET Live. It's time for the Download of the Week. >> Yeah. ^M00:21:22 [ Music ] ^M00:21:26 >> Okay, folks. >> Download of the Week is brought to you by our good friends at CNET's Download.com. Mr. Cooley, what do you got for us today? >> We're talking about new Google toolbar. Not a dramatic redo, but this one has several features. First of all, the one that's most notable is when you install it, down by your start bar, in the lower left corner of your screen, you're gonna see a Google button. So I'm gonna go here and pretend I'm -- in fact, I'm gonna close my browser all the way. Good-bye to IE. Everything's closed. And of course my button still stays there, and that's the key. You've got to Google utility that runs and is operable and available all the time for both Internet and desktop search. Of course, my browsers all jammed up right now, so I can't close. But if I hit the button, you get this sort of pop up window, like so. So it's a separate utility. Secondly, as I said, desktop search as well as Internet search. You also have distributed bookmarks and auto fill. So it'll push that across to any computer you're using, not just have that cache resident on the machine you're sitting at. That's kind of nice. It's all based on Google login. Again, this is not a major redo of the Google toolbar, but it's also got the usual predictive stuff. Like, if I type in the name of somebody who's very famous. >> Dear to you? Oh, I'm sorry. >> Right. That, too. You know, you get the usual predictive ideas and ideas of sub search. >> You search Tom Merritt Twitter a lot, apparently. >> Apparently I do. No, these are actually built in, pre-thingies. Let's find out what's in there -- under there. And of course it spawns a browser to do that. It isn't -- >> So what was it that you couldn't show because it was frozen? Because I've got it. >> This is -- it's all working now. Yeah. >> I've got it open on VM Ware, and OSX is working just fine. >> Yeah, we thought we had it blocked here inside the CNET Network, but it's working now, so I think it's just a policy that we're not supposed to use it. So I've got to go on uninstall it now, but you might want to install it. [Inaudible]. >> All right, let's take one last, quick call, shall we? How about line one? Let's talk some T-Mobile G1, shall we, with George in Shy Town. Hey, George, welcome to CNET Live. >> Turn down your speakers there, George. >> Hello, how are you? I'm George from Chicago. I just got a new G1, and unfortunately, I found out in a hard way that I cannot see streaming videos on it because there is no flash player. I didn't know about. >> Aha. Yep, you're screwed is the answer. >> That -- Brian, did you find anything else out about this? >> There's -- you know, there are -- >> The other Brian. >> There are a few websites that you can actually stream some videos from, and they will not -- they won't be in a flash format. A website, just vtap.com, allows you to take your mobile phone and actually view content. Even if you did a search, like CBS News, it would show up videos like that. I don't know exactly all the specific type of content they have there, but if you are looking for a few websites that you can view video on, you can still do it on your G1. So you're not totally -- you know, out -- you know, you're not totally screwed. But you -- there are some sites out there that you can do it with. >> And the word is that when Flash 10 comes out -- what are we on now? Flash 9? When Flash 10 comes out, it'll be the first one that has wall-to-wall support for mobiles and desktops, but notably, not the iPhone. That's not promised yet. So that is still a hassle they're still trying to work out with Apple. But Flash 10 should be fully out there, in full release, when it's fully baked. It's in pre-release now. That should get, I think, Android support. So cross your fingers. You should be good at that point. >> When is it? By 2011, they're gonna have that Flash available on all phones. >> Hope so. >> Long as that [inaudible]. >> Except for the iPhone. That's the one exception, of course. >> Yeah, no -- all bets are off on the iPhone still. >> They got no idea on when it's coming to the iPhone. >> Yeah, but you should be good very shortly on that, so just hold tight, and you'll be supported. Let's get in one last call here, shall we? >> Let's. Let's go down to Louisiana because it's Ash Thursday. No, it's Holy Thursday. Well, I don't know what -- >> It's what? >> It's -- Mardi Gras' over. You got time to call CNET Live. >> It's hangover Thursday. >> What can we do for you, Alex? >> Hey, guys. How are you? >> We're good. >> You've got our sound up in the background. I can hear it. >> Turn it down. >> Yeah. Put it on mute. >> There you go. >> Guys, I'm actually calling because I've been a PC user for pretty much all my life. And as Windows keeps on updating, it just keeps on getting worse and worse. And they are not comparable to the way Apple is as a company. So I'm really considering switching, and basically, I'm really organized in terms of how my photos are stored into files, how my music is backed up, you know, my word documents, excel documents, and all of that. I just wanted to get an -- >> Oh. Is he still there? >> Don't know what happened, but I lost -- I couldn't hear you. So I think he wanted to get an insight on transferring that -- >> That file structure from a PC to a Mac. >> If I can finish his sentence for him. Yeah. >> He wants to move his environment from a PC to a Mac. He's got a very specific way of laying out his files, his folders, his documents. That's not a difficult issue. >> It's not, really. In fact, I'm doing it right now, kind of piecemeal. >> Yeah. >> The way I started is I had pretty much everything in "My Documents" in Windows. >> Yeah. >> I just took that, and I put it in the "Documents" portion of the Finder. >> Okay. >> Because they lay that out for you. >> Okay. >> Then I went in, and I took -- made sure all the pictures were in "My Pictures." Copied the contents of that directory into "Pictures." >> Okay. >> So you've got some mapping there. Then -- then -- >> But it's relatively analogous across the two. >> Yeah. >> Mm-hmm. >> And then you just kind of look for any outliers. Maybe you've go some -- you know, if you -- you got to take your music and put that from the iTunes music section perhaps, or where ever you keep your music, into the music section of OSX. >> And the key is to look for any apps you've got that put their data into their own directory, for example. I've got a few programs that do that, that don't just ask you where do you want to put your data; they put it there. They tend be oddball programs. I have a one called Scanalog that lets you archive digitally all your magazine clippings, but it doesn't let you control where they go. It puts them in its own folder, so you got to go find those and make sure those come over. >> That's usually in program files. You can kind of page through those. >> Yeah, and go into the program folder. >> And the program folders. >> Yeah. >> And -- >> But for the most part, it's pretty analogous, you know? Like Tom says, they're -- at this point they're largely called the some thing, those regions of files on both machines. So it's just a little bit of tedium and making sure you don't blow out your old drive for months because there's always gonna be something you forgot that you wanted. >> Yeah. Absolutely. It's -- >> Always. >> I mean I've got the Finder up right here, and you can see. You've got your desktop, your documents, your downloads. I don't know if there's a program out there that would kind of make -- >> Yeah, that would just map it over. >> Organize this for -- I'm not aware of one. But it's really not that hard to kind of do on your own. >> Okay. >> And you just got to interpret what all these different folders are, and that's about it. Yeah. >> I feel like dancing. Do you? >> And bookmarks. >> You feel like dancing? >> Feel like dancing. >> You look strangely as good at dancing as Steve Wozniak. >> Or I just need Preparation H, one of the two. But I feel like dancing right now. >> All right, Brian, can you help us here, please? >> Maybe it's just me. >> Yeah -- no -- yeah, I can help you guys out. We actually got a chance to go over to Steve Wozniak's top-secret studio. And we just talked to him about his experience with Dancing with the Stars, and saw him -- you know, shake a little something. So we can roll the video and check it out. >> Well, it's kind of like almost which direction your fingers are pointing, but I'm not gonna be a professional dancer. I know that much. But will I come out enjoying dancing? I'm actually thinking I'm gonna out enjoying dancing, and want to go out regularly with my wife and take -- >> Yeah, see. There you go. >> Like, lessons just in social dancing. >> One, dat, dat, dat, dat, dat, dat, duh. [Inaudible]. >> Look at that, guys. Look how he shakes it. Looks how he shakes it. >> Two, three, shake, one, two, ready -- >> Cooley, you think you could top that? >> Brff. >> Come on. >> No way. He's a big man, but he moves like a cat. I like that. >> Now, you know, he was -- >> Well, not really. >> -- dancing with his partner, Karina Smirnoff, who was quite attractive. >> Oh, was Wozniak in the video? I just saw Karina. >> Pay attention man. Pay attention. But -- >> Oh, there he is. He's in the yellow. >> -- if you watch our Apple Bytes show, you'll actually see myself and Woz do a little throwback and dance to some of those popular moves from the '80s and '90s. So check it out, our Apple Byte. It'll drop, when? On Friday we'll be launching, and we'll also be promoting it through the weekend, and on Monday. So you can check it out and see everything that we did with the Woz. >> Does he dance in serial or parallel, or --? >> I'm not -- I'm not answering that question. >> Dancers make me nervous. They're like carnival people. >> Can you think in code while dancing? >> A little bit weird. I don't get it. >> This is ballroom dancing, though. This is -- >> Yeah, but it's -- >> This is sophisticated. >> Anything to do with a mirror wall is a little tricky. >> That was a Cha Cha he was doing. He was doing Cha Cha. >> Well, I'm not even gonna go there. >> Just throwing that out. >> So Apply Byte, right? >> Yes. >> That's what we're -- >> That's where you'll get the entire scoop of what we did. >> You'll get the full scoop. >> Right. >> Yep. >> You got a little chance to sit down with Woz. That's awesome. >> Yeah, it was -- it was fun. He's a real nice guy. Real nice guy. >> Or as they call him on the official Lost Podcast, the Woaz. >> The Woaz. >> Great. >> Let's leave it at that. That's it for this week, blessedly so. Join us next week folks, and don't forget to send us video questions. Send us links to any video question you've recorded on any of the major video sharing sites, and then just tell us where to go find it. We might roll it in the show and answer that for you right here live, on CNET Live, which of course will be here next Thursday at 1:00 Pacific. >> That's right, at 4:00 PM Eastern. We know that's where most of you are. >> And 11:00 AM Hawaiian time. Do the hula, dance in Woz style. >> 9:00 PM for the Brits. Saw your Twitter. >> Bye. See you. ^M00:30:02 [ Music ]

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