CNET Live: April 9, 2009
31:15

CNET Live: April 9, 2009

Culture
[ Music ] ^M00:00:09 >> Tom Merritt: Coming up on CNET Live a reason to celebrate. >> Brian Cooley: That's right. We're two years old and still acting like it. >> Tom Merritt: Yeah. Well, we're both more than two years old. The show is two years old. That show is CNET Live, and it starts now. ^M00:00:19 [ Music ] ^M00:00:28 >> Brian Cooley: If you bring in the inside story, we'll tell you one of these days. >> Tom Merritt: Just give us a drink, and oh, look at that. Welcome to CNET Live. I'm Tom Merritt. He's Brian Cooley. Brian Tong is here as well. >> Brian Tong: What's up guys? Are you feeling, they've already filled me up. >> Tom Merritt: Two years old. >> Brian Tong: This is as much as I can take. >> Brian Cooley: You're drinking from a CNET beaker. >> Tom Merritt: Alright. Cheers to everybody. >> Brian Cooley: BT, [crosstalk] - >> Tom Merritt: You at home please. You know. Help yourselves. >> Brian Cooley: Please. Got one here for you if you want to slide along by. >> Tom Merritt: 888-900-[crosstalk] >> Brian Cooley: What was that retching sound I just heard [laughs] from the nook? >> Tom Merritt: 888-900-2638. >> Brian Cooley: Wow. >> Tom Merritt: Call and any of us will answer as soon as Brian Tong recovers. Yeah. That's right. We try to answer your tech questions. Do our best we can. We got people in the chat room of proud CNET fans and wild ride. They can help you out as well. We've got our forums. It's, it's an army of people - >> Brian Cooley: There's a lot of ways to play. >> Tom Merritt: Here to help you with your tech problems. >> Brian Cooley: But no matter how many years we're here, [laughs], hopefully not too many more, we always kick it off with a couple of things we crave. ^M00:01:21 [ Music ] ^M00:01:26 >> Tom Merritt: These are some of our favorite things from the Crave blog at crave.cnet.com. >> Brian Cooley: What are you craving there, big boy? >> Tom Merritt: Well, me and BT are kind of teaming up on this one today. >> Brian Cooley: Yeah. >> Tom Merritt: It's the, the new PSP is expected to be announced at E3, and a lot of people are starting to compare it to the iPhone. >> Brian Cooley: Question mark on this, right. >> Tom Merritt: Yeah, yeah. Well, it's, it's, it's very rumorish [phonetic] - >> Brian Cooley: Yes. >> Tom Merritt: Let's say, but if you look at it, it's, it's got a more compact form factor. They're talking about a slidie [phonetic] screen. I mean, just, it's, it's a generation up from PSP. So this is going to be the PSP2, right, Brian? >> Brian Tong: Yeah. Without a doubt. Now, this is a mock up of what people have been hearing from direct like developers on the hardware. But the main thing that I like, OK, first of all, you're getting rid of the proprietary UMD format. These are these discs that were like mini CD's - >> Brian Cooley: About time. >> Brian Tong: In a plastic encasing that made it, you know, Sony's proprietary ways that made it a lot thicker. You get dual analog joy sticks so it's like a real controller, and the fact is the rumor said it'll be involved some sort of touch screen capabilities. So the, the device has always had great potential, but this is actually something that's going to be super compelling. That, you know, they've updated, what, three times over the past [crosstalk] four years. So it's the same, the same thing. Nothing's really been different. >> Tom Merritt: Nothing really big. So hopefully E3, we'll hear about a big new PSP2. At least that's what pocket gamers interested - >> Brian Tong: Yeah. >> Tom Merritt: According to their inside source. All rumor right now, folks. >> Brian Cooley: Big change. >> Tom Merritt: Big change. >> Brian Cooley: Big change. OK. So I'm looking at something that I do not crave, and I want you all to [laughs] this with me. This damn thing came out at the New York Auto Show, which is underway right now. This is the, in case you haven't heard about it, this GM Segway partnership. They call it the Puma. Personal Urban Mobility Accessibility thing. >> Tom Merritt: Check out the Cougar. >> Brian Cooley: Check off the stupid. It's like a wide Segway, but it has like a rickshaw on this to it. >> Brian Tong: [crosstalk] It's the rickshaw 2009. >> Brian Cooley: It's pretty technically impressive. So you've got two people in there, and it's doing that kind of two wheel hovering balance thing that a Segway scooter does. >> Brian Tong: No. >> Brian Cooley: That impresses me. This is not the big idea, OK, General Motors. This is not it. I know you're being run by the White House, but come on. Pretend like you're still a car company, and make this go away. I, I don't get it, but go check out our coverage on it. >> Tom Merritt: They're going to rearchitect [phonetic] whole cities around this, Brian. >> Brian Cooley: Yeah. I've heard that before. Yeah. Where have I heard that? >> Tom Merritt: Time for your questions. We're going to kick it off with a video question. This one comes from our friend, Theresa, or also known as roadtess [assumed spelling], down in Irvine, California. >> Theresa: Hi guys. I have both an iPhone question and a call for help. First, I've seen people talking about streaming video from their iPhones, which I assume are jail broken. I'm curious about how this works and wondering why anyone would bother since the camera is so relatively low quality, but second, and more importantly, I'd like to use my iPhone to record audio such as meetings or lectures or interviews, but mainly for the purpose of making a transcript. Not keeping a high-quality recording. I'd appreciate any suggestions. Thanks in advance. >> Tom Merritt: Alright, tess. Well, the video streaming for the iPhone, your guess is as good as mine about why anyone would do it with that crappy camera, but there are a lot of jail broken apps out there including QIK, that will allow you to stream from the iPhone, and QIK does have a legitimate app that has not been approved yet for the iTunes store. We don't know when it's coming, but that should be coming along eventually as well, which will allow you to do the live steaming. Now, as far as the other question, BT, I think you got that one. >> Brian Tong: Yeah. So if you're talking about audio recording, there are a plethora of apps on the store, and really the main thing that I've been able to find between kind of the cheaper free ones versus the ones that are a little more expensive is that some of them crap out after, if you want to do like a long lecture or meeting. They don't have the reliability. So there's two suggestions that are highly rated for audio quality as well as other higher-end features. You want, you might want to look at HT Professional Voice Recorder. It's, I think it's around $4.99 as well as iWreck [phonetic] Voice Recorder, and they are higher-end. You do have to pay a little more, but it's going to pay off in the long run because of the quality. And then if you're trying to jump over to transcribing, people that want to transcribe their notes or these meetings, there's a free application that's called Express Scribe. It's available for Windows and Mac, and it also incorporates these foot pedals if you're not familiar with it. You can like increase the speed so you can type faster instead of if someone's talking really slow, then you'll want to just skip through that and type, make their voice, you know, kind of sound like a speedy voice. >> Brian Cooley: And Tess, we've got a hardware gadget here. If you've got an iPod floating around, you can dedicate to doing the recording. Most of us have got an iPhone, have an iPod somewhere. This is called the Elesis [assumed spelling] ProTrack or ProTrack 16. You put your iPod in it. It supports five of the most recent models of iPod, and turns it into an extremely high-quality recorder that could do a very good job of picking up voices that are distant. You know, it's got high-quality microphones you see at the top there for stereo high-resolution recording. It's $189 list, a little less than street. We're not crazy about it, and it's not perfectly executed, but you should at least look at the review that Donald Bell just put up. >> Tom Merritt: We did a, we did an episode of "Sword and Laser" in one of these things. >> Brian Cooley: Oh. How did it sound? >> Tom Merritt: It, it worked fine. We were doing it at the new Media Expo last year in August. >> Brian Cooley: How long was that recording? >> Tom Merritt: In the Ex house. About 30 minutes. >> Brian Cooley: OK. So the battery lasts definitely good enough for that. It doesn't run really long on batteries. That's one of the issues. >> Tom Merritt: Oh righty then. >> Brian Cooley: Get to more calls. >> Tom Merritt: Yeah, shall we? >> Brian Cooley: Adam's in Ontario. Been waiting the longest so that's where we start up. Adam, welcome to the second anniversary show of CNET Live. >> Adam: Hi guys. Thanks for having me. >> Brian Cooley: Thanks. What's up? >> Adam: I want to just get a, a specific area of my screen onto another screen in Mac OS10 without using mirroring or extended desktop. >> Tom Merritt: So, I, I think I understand what you're saying, which is like, you've got something up in the corner, and you got a bunch of other things going on, and you want on a second monitor, you just want to show that thing up in the corner. Is that right? >> Adam: Yeah. >> Tom Merritt: OK. There, there's a real easy and expensive way to do this. It's what we've got sitting over there that allows us to do our screen catches, and in fact, if we do one right now, here's, here's what, go ahead and zoom on in, Len, so he sees how this works. I've got this up in a browser on my screen, but as you see as we zoom in and move around, we can show just a portion of my screen to you. Now, that's exactly what you want to do, but it's $5,000. [laughter] So Cooley's got a cheaper way to do this. >> Brian Cooley: Yeah. So check this out. I've got something from a company called Kanopus [assumed spelling]. They do a lot of great video gear. It's called the Twin Packed 100. It's about $500 list. I found it for $360 street, and again, it's a scan converter. So it's going to take that portion of the image you want. You can zero in on it, and then send that out to another monitor, but again, we're talking hundreds. At least it's not thousands. >> Tom Merritt: Now, there, there are software ways to try this, but I haven't found one that does what the hardware does. That's the most elegant way to do it, - >> Brian Cooley: Yeah. >> Tom Merritt: But if you want, you want to try to do no money, you can try downloading Camtwist [assumed spelling] and playing around with that. What Camtwist is meant for is capturing a piece of your screen and sending it out in web video. So, for instance, if you're doing a live stream on UStream [assumed spelling], and you want to show part of your desktop, you can show part of your desktop. You could probably work it so that it was sending that instead to video sending it to another monitor, and the easy way would be to hook that monitor up to a second computer and send it over the video [crosstalk] but there might be another way to send that signal to the other monitor as well. >> Brian Cooley: I'm intrigued by this one. Adam, what are you doing? >> Adam: Well, my friend's a DJ, and he wants to get the songs that are coming up next on a [crosstalk] USB display in front of his laptop. >> Tom Merritt: OK. So, so what you got going on here - >> Brian Cooley: [crosstalk] Yeah. I've got this little mini USB monitor that I have hooked up to my computer here, and it's basically an extended desktop mode, though. I'm not able to take a portion of my main screen and iso [phonetic] it over on this display. So that's not really what you're trying to get at unless you can put those song titles or what have you into a separate program window and drag it over here and maximize it on this monitor, which is what I do with one application here. This is called a MIMO [assumed spelling] UM740, MIMOmonitor.com is where you go buy these. >> Adam: OK. Thanks a lot, guys. [crosstalk] >> Brian Cooley: Not to give them too much a plug for crying out loud. >> Tom Merritt: Yeah, thanks a lot, Adam. >> Brian Cooley: Thanks, Adam. Appreciate it. >> Tom Merritt: And thanks for calling. >> Brian Cooley: We've got time for another here before we take a break. Let's go to Roland. He's in Minneapolis. He's got a question here about, oh, interesting. An iPod Touch peripheral question. Hello, Roland. Welcome to CNET Live. >> Roland: Hey guys. How are you doing? >> Brian Cooley: Great. >> Tom Merritt: We're doing great. >> Brian Cooley: Oh, boy, we're doing better every minute. Let me tell you. >> Roland: Well, one thing I'd like to say to Brian Tong. I would like to say I ask him, how do you keep a straight face during the "Apple Byte" ifu [phonetic] video. I don't know how you do that, so. [laughter] >> Brian Tong: It, it takes a lot of skill, Roland. They - >> Roland: Yeah. >> Brian Tong: They trained, Tom and Brian trained me well, obviously, right? >> Brian Cooley: Yeah, well we're the straight guys. >> Brian Tong: Did you like that though? >> Roland: Oh yeah. It, it gave me a few good laughs. So. >> Brian Tong: Alright. So what's your question buddy? >> Roland: Well, I have an iPod Touch, and you know how there's a lot of like Skype apps. Well, I got pretty much WiFi cause I'm in Minneapolis, and we have WiFi over the whole city. And most of the places I go, you know, I pretty much have WiFi paid for. Well, anyway, I was wondering if there's any way I can buy like a headset for like, almost like a headset where, you know, with the microphone for the iPod Touch? >> Brian Tong: Now, do you have a first gen or a second gen iPod Touch? >> Roland: It is the first gen. >> Brian Tong: OK. So, for people that don't know, one of the tricks with the first gen iPod Touch is that, first of all, it does support mics, but there's no, the hardware doesn't enable to use something like Apple's headset that some people use for the iPhone that have the mic built into it. So there are a few options that you can look at. MacAlley is the company that makes a lot of peripherals for Apple products, and they have a product called the iVoice 3, and what it is is, it's a microphone that plugs into the bottom of your iPod Touch that you can use as a mic. The trick is that you'll need to plug in your headset at least for the earphones to make that microphone active. So you can do it, but unfortunately, there's not an all-in-one solution that has the mic and the headset in one piece, but if you wanted to still do Skype-type calls and things of that nature, you'll at least be able to on your first gen iPod. So check out MacAlley, and they have two mics. The iVoice 3 is the one that you'll probably want to look at, OK. >> Roland: OK. And one more question. Do you have time? >> Brian Cooley: Super quick. Super quick. >> Brian Tong: Yeah. Go for it. >> Roland: I was wondering, if there's any way I can charge it while my computer is sleeping so I don't have to have my computer running to charge it? >> Brian Tong: Yeah. We, we, we actually have a question like this in, in the calls, right? >> Brian Cooley: This is it. [laughs] >> Brian Tong: Oh, this is it? >> Brian Cooley: Yeah. It's him. >> Brian Tong: Oh. >> Roland: Yeah. Same person. Same person here. >> Brian Tong: Oh, oh, oh, sorry. [laughs] Sorry about that. >> Brian Cooley: He's been climbing around the rafters a lot. He's a little dizzy right now. >> Tom Merritt: Yeah. >> Brian Tong: So, I did look up one strategy because are you low on power outlets or what? You don't want to just plug it into the wall? >> Roland: I do not, well, I don't really have one that plugs into the wall. So, and it's like $30 from Apple, so it's like - >> Tom Merritt: Did you lose your charging pack or something? >> Brian Cooley: Well, no. I still, I still have the USB cable running to the computer. >> Tom Merritt: You just don't have the plug? >> Roland: But mine didn't come with like a wall adapter so. >> Brian Tong: Yeah, so eventually when you close your computer and make it go to sleep, it's not going to, typically, it won't send power out to a device connected to it. One strategy that some people have done is if you can find them on eBay, there's the older iPod cable that had USB and Firewire on it. And from what I've been told, if, if the computer is at least sleeping and still glowing that the Firewire can still charge that iPod but not through the USB, which is, it's kind of interesting. Look that up, but I don't know if you have any other ideas. >> Brian Cooley: [crosstalk] Still on eBay, and just found a really cheap wall adapter with [crosstalk] USB. I mean, they have all kinds of, Griffin makes one. They show up on eBay for like $6.95. So try that. OK. Coming up. Molly Wood's going to share some spyware avoidance techniques. Handy. But first, New York Auto Show is underway this week. In fact, starting up tomorrow for the public. We, of course, get in there early, and we took a look at Ford's new and improved high-tech family minivan. Check this out. ^M00:12:58 [ Music ] ^M00:13:02 >> Brian Cooley: Ford's making a fresh run at the minivan and aiming it straight at what they call the cool moms. I assume they don't mean the ones who offer pot and booze. The first thing you notice is how it preserves mom and dad's sanity with a divider between them and the kids. Though that does have a large pass-through hole in it. The kids shouldn't mind this generational segregation because they get the two giant flat screens in the bulkhead along with scooter racks in the doors, whiteboards to scribble all over, even an FRS radio-charging rack, and a dispenser for hand sanitizer. Kids love that. Taking a page from Ford's newest work trucks, you could option an in-dash computer and an RFID system that would let you know if you've forgotten to put anything or anyone back in the vehicle. This is, of course, a concept, but interestingly, almost none of what it shows is beyond the realm of current in-car tech. >> Brian Cooley: Alright. So, of course, the New York Show going on as we speak. Lot of cool things going on at that Show. The videos are happening right now at CNETtv.com. We've got about a handful of them up there right now. I want to share this one with you. This is another hot car. I think it's going to get a lot of buzz. Prototype at this point. It's an Acura called the ZDX. So it's kind of falling under their name strategy, but notice the shape of this thing. It's kind of taking a page out of the Toyota Venza or the BMW X6, both of which Tom Merritt hates. Because they make no sense. >> Tom Merritt: Well, yeah, it's not, it's not an SU, there's no UV to it. >> Brian Cooley: Because the back is chunky. >> Tom Merritt: Yeah. It's, it's, it's a freaking car. It's a big car. >> Brian Cooley: And it's, and it's a strange new trend. >> Tom Merritt: It's not even that big compared to like cars from the 50's. >> Brian Cooley: [laughs] So right. Let's all go to Cuba and pick up a 50-year-old El Dorado. >> Tom Merritt: Oh. They've got UV's all over the place in Cuba. >> Brian Cooley: This is coupe UV. I've dubbed it that. No one else uses that term, by the way. And then we have this really cool car from Honda. It's not actually a car. It's going to be a trim level. I think we have some video of this. The Honda Element dog-friendly package. And so it's going to have a whole variety of, of dog-friendly utilities in it. So there's the pooch. There's the Element that looks normal. Now we see the little special doggie badging. And then check this out. You've got a ramp that comes out of the back for dogs that have like a back problem or can't get up in the back of the vehicle. I know a lot of dogs like that so that's very handy. There's the bed in the back. That's an actual dog bed. A spill-proof bowl. There's a little tethering area with a mesh net. [laughter] Of course, the whole thing has got this rubberized mat so it cleans up easily. Very cool. No pricing or availability yet, but I think it's going to be a dealer-option package or maybe even factory coming out in just a few months on those Honda Elements. >> Tom Merritt: Yeah. I would, my dog walker in San Francisco before I moved to Oakland - >> Brian Cooley: Yeah. >> Tom Merritt: Had one of those and returned it within a year. >> Brian Cooley: The Honda Elements. >> Tom Merritt: The older, the older model. Yeah. >> Brian Cooley: Really? Because it looks like a great dog vehicle. >> Tom Merritt: He was just like he thought it was going to be great for the dogs, and he's like. It just did, did not work for him. So he ended up going to a van. >> Brian Cooley: Big side door opens, the dog can run right in, [inaudible] the other side door open, and run right out. >> Tom Merritt: And I think he just found it uncomfortable and unworkable. >> Brian Cooley: Well, alright. Well, Mr. Car Hater is going to be here today. >> Tom Merritt: By the way, - >> Brian Cooley: Welcome to the car hate show. >> Tom Merritt: I hate cars. And car tech. Time to take a quick break, but we're going to be back with the download of the week that will help you get your songs off of your iPhone. Stick with us. ^M00:16:06 [ Music ] ^M00:16:12 >> Hi. I'm Drew Carey, and you're watching CNET TV right now, but I guess you don't feel like working. Are you much better looking in your profile than you are in real life, or are your love affairs carried out by texting? CNET TV is for people who are too cool for regular TV. ^M00:16:24 [ Music ] ^M00:16:42 >> [laughter] When the biggest stars, [laughter], need the biggest laughs, [laughter] they come to Dave. [laughter] The Late Show with David Letterman. >> Why are we laughing? >> I'm not sure. >> Weeknights on CBS. ^M00:16:57 [ Music ] ^M00:17:02 >> Brian Cooley: OK. Welcome back to CNET Live. The second anniversary show, by the way. Thank you so much for being with us these last two years. Keep the calls coming. 888-900-CNET. With that in mind, I want to go to a call right now. Been waiting patiently on line three, and I think it's going to be perhaps another one of those firsts. Hello to Microsoft Hands. >> Microsoft Hands: Hello. I am Microsoft Anna from Mountain View, California, and I'm having Windows Vista sleep problems. >> Brian Cooley: How can we help you with that? [laughs] Yeah, what, what, what exactly are your sleep problems? >> Tom Merritt: You sound like a psychiatrist. It's probably going to take - >> Microsoft Hands: [inaudible] >> Tom Merritt: Yeah. He's got to type in the problem here. >> Brian Cooley: This is why people didn't use text-to-speech to call talk shows. >> Tom Merritt: You've got to have it in text path. >> Brian Cooley: [laughs] Right. >> Tom Merritt: For anticipating the responses. >> Brian Cooley: Or just go buy a cart machine. That's another idea. >> Tom Merritt: Vista sleep problems are not that unusual. So if you've got, - >> Brian Cooley: No. >> Tom Merritt: If you got anything else to add to it, let us know. >> Brian Cooley: No, but what are your basic - >> Microsoft Hands: Automatically. >> Brian Cooley: Go ahead. >> Microsoft Hands: Vista wakes up automatically. [laughter] >> Brian Tong: Just wakes up automatically. >> Tom Merritt: It wakes up automatically? >> Brian Tong: Yeah. [crosstalk] That's what - >> Tom Merritt: So it doesn't go to sleep. >> Brian Cooley: Does it stay asleep? >> Tom Merritt: So it doesn't stay asleep? >> Brian Tong: Yeah. It just - >> Brian Cooley: Use Vista as a toddler. It just doesn't sleep yet. >> Tom Merritt: Well, no, the - >> Brian Cooley: Alright. >> Tom Merritt: Problem with Vista - >> Brian Cooley: What, what we do with this. >> Tom Merritt: Is usually traced back to driver issues. More, most commonly in video drivers, the sound drivers, and I say in video because they're much more often within video than in ATI [inaudible] video drivers. Sound drivers sometimes from, from cards like Creative it they're not upgraded, and also the LSI, the skuzzy controller, sater [phonetic] controller - >> Brian Cooley: Yeah. >> Tom Merritt: Sometimes those, so you want to go through and upgrade every driver you can that you can think of. Even, even your board drivers for your, for you circuit boards. And even look for beta drivers. There's some really cool sites out there that'll give you some good INI files if the beta drivers aren't working correctly. But almost all of the sleep problems that I've found mentioned were solved by somebody tracking it down to one or in some cases up to three or four different drivers that were preventing Vista to sleep, from properly putting it to sleep. Now, most of those were going to sleep and not waking up. You seem to be having the opposite problem, which it goes to sleep - >> Brian Cooley: And won't stay down [crosstalk]. Yeah. But again, the drivers are probably the same side, different side of the same coin. >> Tom Merritt: Yeah, but we'll, we'll put it out into the chat room. I'll do a little more research too, and see if, if anybody else out there has got a, a way to figure out how to keep it asleep versus how to get it to wake up. >> Brian Cooley: Unplug it. That always works. >> Tom Merritt: Alright. Time now for the "Download of the Week". ^M00:19:43 [ Music ] ^M00:19:48 >> Tom Merritt: "Download of the Week" is brought to you by our good friends at CNET's download.com, purveyor of spyware free free software, and today, I'm looking at pod-to-PC. I want to thank Daniel for sending this in to us. This is an excellent free program that allows you to pull the songs off an iPod or an iPhone. And as you know, with an iPod it's not that hard really because you can plug it in and turn it into a drive and then just drag and drop stuff off. With the iPod Touch, not so easy, and the iPhone, not so easy because of the flash drive. It doesn't mount as a regular drive. So what this does is essentially flips that on its head and does it for you. Mounts it as a drive, not really mounts it as a drive - >> Brian Cooley: Yeah, but it looks like one. [crosstalk] Yeah. >> Tom Merritt: And so I can go through here, and I look at, you know, I look at my playlist. It tells me all the songs that are on there. I can check them and decide, OK, I want to transfer those to my hard drive, and I don't have to have the account. I don't have to use iTunes. I don't have to have it plugged in. It can, it can be mount my iPhone. >> Brian Cooley: And this will move anything. >> Tom Merritt: Trying to get [crosstalk] yeah. >> Brian Cooley: It doesn't get tripped up by a protected AAAC or anything like that. >> Tom Merritt: It'll move, it just moves the file. >> Brian Cooley: Just sees it as a file. >> Tom Merritt: It's just taking the file, moving it off. It'll move videos off. Now, one cool thing you see here. It's got a video preview section. It will not play copy-protected videos in the video preview, but this is a cool thing. If you've got a, a video, and you take it over to a friend's house, and you're like, hey, I want to show this to you, but I want to show it up on the computer, if you try to plug your iPhone into their computer, you've got all these sync problems with iTunes [crosstalk] that might overwrite. >> Brian Cooley: Oh, that's a mess. That's a mess. >> Tom Merritt: You can use this to share the video up on the computer screen. >> Brian Cooley: Doesn't Apple not like this? >> Tom Merritt: I don't know that Apple really cares that much to be honest. I mean, they, they didn't stop the iPod from being mountable as a drive so that you can pull stuff up. That wasn't - >> Brian Cooley: Well, they didn't make it easy either. >> Tom Merritt: Yeah, they actually made it pretty easy. There's a checkbox in iTunes, but with the iPhone and the iPod Touch, they had to go, they would have to do more to make that mountable, and so they didn't bother. >> Brian Cooley: But there was an issue early on where they didn't let you pull stuff off the iPod. At least not iTunes - >> Tom Merritt: Sync, syncing problems. I think maybe is what we're making out. >> Brian Cooley: Let's go to the phones. Let's go to - >> Tom Merritt: I wanted to say real quick, though, pod-to-PC and pod-to-PC.com, or you can download it at download.com. Also has pod photo transfer to getting your photos off. >> Brian Cooley: Yup. >> Tom Merritt: And pod to Mac for the Mac. >> Brian Cooley: Let's go to Eric [assumed spelling]. He's in Utah. He has the most confounding question of the show. One that we have no idea how to answer. That's why we're taking it. Hello, Eric. Welcome to CNET Live. >> Eric: Well, that's promising. [laughter] >> Brian Cooley: Isn't it? >> Tom Merritt: So give it what you got. >> Eric: Yeah. So I, I disconnected my computer to my TV to get rid of my computer desk, and it works pretty well except I hate having to use my lap as a keyboard and then my leg is - >> Tom Merritt: Yeah. Yeah. I've got the same problem. >> Eric: [crosstalk] a way to consolidate it. What was that? >> Tom Merritt: I've, I've got the same problem because I've got my media center PC hooked up to the television. Now, for, are you using, what's, what's on the computer? Is it Mac? Is it a Windows machine? What is it? >> Eric: It's just, it's an old Dell someone gave to me. >> Tom Merritt: OK. And does it have Windows Media Center? >> Eric: No. >> Tom Merritt: OK. >> Eric: I don't, I don't just want it for media. I want to actually do computing - >> Tom Merritt: Yeah. >> Eric: [crosstalk] spreadsheets, composing e-mails, and stuff. >> Tom Merritt: OK. So you want a full keyboard is what you're saying? >> Eric: I don't care as much about the keyboard. I'm, I'm thinking a lot about the Swipe concept to use kind of a software interface and a Wii remote, but I can't get that working. >> Tom Merritt: Yeah. I, I don't know of anything easy for that. I mean there are miniature keyboards with the mouse track ball built in that you can do, but I, you're, you're thinking more advanced than that. You're thinking of something that allows you to do like gesture modifications. I know, I know - >> Eric: And the Wii remote with as many, as many buttons as it has, I could also, you know, do, do some coding to use those, those buttons in various ways too. >> Tom Merritt: Yeah. There are some people that are using the Wii to control a PC, and that might be the solution that you're looking for. There, I've got a joystick article that I'll put in the show notes that shows you how to control a PC with a Wii remote. I'm not sure how well it works, or what you have to do to make it happen, but that at least gives you a jumping-off point. Does that help? >> Eric: Actually, I've tried, I don't know specifically what joystick article you're trying, but I've tried some of those softwares, and it doesn't seem to work. The software itself. >> Tom Merritt: OK. >> Eric: I don't know if that's just because I'm dumb, but - >> Tom Merritt: No, no. Well, you're certainly not dumber than we are because we've got, we've got nothing for you. [crosstalk] >> Brian Cooley: As promised. >> Tom Merritt: BT, you got anything? >> Brian Tong: No, I'm, I'm, I'm, I don't have anything. Sorry. >> Tom Merritt: Alright. Eric, you struck out. Yeah. >> Eric: I, I am - >> Tom Merritt: [crosstalk] I told you we wouldn't have a damn answer. >> Eric: BMC in my laptop to take control of the computer, but it's a bit, it's a bit, I mean, that's better than what I currently have. It's a bit clunky, clunky, and sometimes my wife and I like to use both computers. >> Tom Merritt: Yeah. >> Eric: Along [crosstalk] - >> Tom Merritt: So, wait a minute. If you're using BMC, you're using one computer to control the one at the TV, right? >> Eric: Right. >> Tom Merritt: Why not just use a wireless, like a Bluetooth keyboard and mouse at that point? >> Eric: It's - >> Tom Merritt: Too far. >> Eric: Is there a keyboard, a wireless keyboard/mouse combo? >> Tom Merritt: Yeah, yeah. There, I can, I can try to look up. There's a Bluetooth keyboard out there that does have the mouse built in like a track pad kind of thing. >> Brian Cooley: Yeah, track pad. >> Eric: OK. >> Tom Merritt: It's not exactly the gestural thing. >> Brian Cooley: No, it's a two-handed thing. It's a regular keyboard. >> Tom Merritt: I mean if you're good, you can. [laughter] >> Brian Cooley: Depends, depends on how fast you type. >> Eric: There's no, I mean, there's no like, like I can do ten-key just fine. Like that's one-handed right. >> Brian Cooley: Yeah, but that wouldn't by QWERTY keyboard. >> Tom Merritt: No. The one, yeah, the one is a, the one we've got, there's a Logitech one somebody in the chat room put up that's a QWERTY keyboard. >> Brian Cooley: Yeah. >> Tom Merritt: And then there's, what is this Gyration.com from Merisan [assumed spelling]? >> Brian Cooley: One of those 3D. >> Tom Merritt: Pulling that up right now. Of course, there's the air mouse. A bunch of people are suggesting that. Where you can - >> Eric: Air mouse? >> Tom Merritt: Yeah. You can use your iPhone, and if you don't have an iPhone, it doesn't help you. But you can use the iPhone as a mouse using one of the apps. >> Brian Cooley: Doesn't get your QWERTY though. Yeah. I don't know, I don't know if we have an answer for him on this one. >> Eric: And what, what about, what about just software that is a keyboard on a screen? I'm finding with that. Do you know of anything like that? >> Tom Merritt: I don't know anything off the top of my head, but I know that's out there for sure. You can get, you can get on-screen keyboards. They, they, search around in places that have a collection of software for tablets. That's where you'll find a lot of third-party apps for putting keyboards on screen. >> Brian Cooley: Alright, Eric. Thanks for the call. Appreciate it. >> Tom Merritt: Alright. There's been a lot of talk these last few weeks about the Conflicker computer virus. Well, that one has, so far, not really done that much damage although it's unleashing new payloads as we speak. Viruses are lurking everywhere on the Internet, and Molly Wood has a few tips for avoiding the dark side of the web. ^M00:26:13 [ Music ] ^M00:26:18 >> Molly Wood: Hi. I'm Molly Wood from CNET.com here with a tip on making sure you're really secure when you're downloading security software. Our download.com team got a reader e-mail from gergigbear [assumed spelling] asking how do you tell a rogue anti-virus site from the good sites? Now, you might have heard of this threat posed by rogue anti-virus vendors. Maybe you've seen a message telling you that you're computer is infected, and you need to buy some software right now to fix it, or worse, scammers can compromise legitimate anti-virus websites and redirect you to a bogus site. Usually, the scammers harvest your credit card information and whatever you pay for the fake software, and then they never deliver any software. But some fake anti-virus software can actually contain viruses or worse. So you need to be careful. And here's some tips from our download.com editors on how to avoid getting scammed. First tip, it's all about the source. If you've discovered the site from a pop up on your computer screen or in your system tray, all signs point to rogue. This is a well-known scare tactic that these illegitimate companies use to herd you to their sites. Instead, you should search for your own security software on CNET download.com or some other reputable site. You will get legitimate recommendations and also ratings and editor's reviews. Next tip, take a good, hard look at the website. Legitimate anti-spyware companies spend a lot of money to make their sites look good. So if you see spelling errors or bad graphics, steer clear. Of course, a bogus company could also make a nice website, which is why the third tip is to use a link-scanning app like MacAfee Site Advisor or Link Scanner Light that will actually warn you with yellow or red buttons in the browser window if the site seems unsafe. Now, you can visit download.com for a lot more tips on avoiding unsafe sites, and you can find our top security picks at the link on the screen. It's a dangerous world out there, and I hope this will help you stay a little bit safer. For CNET.com, I'm Molly Wood, and you're welcome. ^M00:28:11 [ Music ] ^M00:28:14 >> Brian Cooley: OK, folks. Welcome back to CNET Live. And we'll wrap up the show with our last calls. >> Tom Merritt: Yeah. I wanted to give a shout out to anonymousjoseph [assumed spelling] in the chat room, who pointed out Magnifier in Windows xp allows you to take a part of the screen - >> Brian Cooley: Yeah. >> Tom Merritt: And put it on a different monitor. >> Brian Cooley: Oh, really? >> Tom Merritt: So we'll put that link in the show notes. That might help out our earlier caller. >> Brian Cooley: Didn't know it did that. Line - >> Tom Merritt: And Air Mouse is also the name of a Logitech mouse that does gesture control for our previous caller [crosstalk] >> Brian Cooley: Still no QWERTY. Let's got to Nick. He's in New York. Wants to share a screen between a Mac and a PC. Nick, real quickly. What's on your mind? >> Nick: Sure. I'll make this really quick. [inaudible] Happy anniversary. So I have a PC now and a Macbook. This is the one that I cloned the hard drive and can't work it in Carbon Copy Clone or Time Machine. Anyway, I wanted to see, I want to see if I can screen share the PC as I can screen share the Mac to my Macbook as if I was screen sharing a Macbook with a [inaudible]. >> Tom Merritt: OK. BT, what's the word on this? >> Brian Tong: Yeah. Check out quickly, it's, I don't know if it's pronounced yugma or yugma. That's Y-U-G-M-A.com. They have a Skype edition software program that's free. It works between Macs and Window computers that you can screen share, and that's where you got to go. >> Tom Merritt: Also logmein.com, also [inaudible] allows you to screen share and access the whole computer. So [crosstalk] we'll put a couple of those in the show notes for you. >> Brian Cooley: OK. Last call is Chris in Florida. Chris, welcome to CNET Live. What can we do for you? >> Chris: Hey guys. I just want to know, like, what the easiest way it would be for me to switch from Yahoo Mail to GMail? >> Brian Cooley: OK. So start by exporting your contacts out of Yahoo Mail as a CSV, they call it as Yahoo CSV, separated like a spreadsheet file. You can import that into GMail. There's your contacts. The messages are a little dicier because Yahoo doesn't want you to take them out as a mailbox and move them somewhere else. You can forward them each one at a time to the new account. That's a little tedious. I bet you've got a lot of messages. I did find an interesting and yet by me untested process, and we'll put this up in the show notes. Well, Tom will. Where you use a couple of pieces of software. One's called Get Mail. One's called Y Pops, and basically, it's an automated forward. It'll go through and forward message by message to another account, 25 at a time. And then you just ignore your Yahoo account after that. So we'll put that up for you in the show notes. Thanks for the call. Wow. >> Tom Merritt: Alright. Well, that, that is it for this week. I will not be here next week because I'm going to be in Malta. >> Brian Cooley: Is that a joke? >> Tom Merritt: No. [crosstalk] It's a real country. >> Brian Cooley: That's an amazingly cool destination. >> Tom Merritt: Yeah. It's an IA, is kind of the, the European CEA. They, they invited me out to do some conference - >> Brian Cooley: It's a billing dog. I mean it's work for you. >> Tom Merritt: Totally. >> Brian Cooley: So, it all goes to hell next week when it's me and BT here on the desk. >> Brian Tong: It's only? >> Brian Cooley: Molly in the nook, and we'll be out with you to figure things out as best as we can. Next Thursday, 4:00 Eastern. >> Tom Merritt: That's right. 1:00 Pacific time. >> Brian Tong: 10:00 a.m. Hawaiian. >> Tom Merritt: Oh, and 10:00 p.m. Maltese. >> Brian Cooley: We'll call and wake him up. ^M00:30:56 [ Music ]

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