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Samsung Z1

Powered by Tizen, not Android, Samsung's Z1 smartphone comes with a bargain-basement price and is heading for developing countries.

Neptune Duo

No smartphone needed? This Android Lollipop smartwatch pairs with a "pocket screen" instead.

Samsung Gear S

The wildly ambitious Samsung Gear S smartwatch doubles as a full standalone smartphone, but the software and apps available don't let it do as much as you'd expect.

Sharp Aquos Crystal

Don't fret about the unremarkable features -- the Sharp Aquos Crystal is a great buy with a compelling edgeless display that renders it unlike any phone currently on the market.

Huawei Vision with Ray Odin Mobile

The Project Ray operating system can turn a modest Android phone like the Huawei Vision into a device for the seeing-impaired. Get CNET's first impressions of the reenvisioned smartphone here.

ZTE Prelude Aio Wireless

The ZTE Prelude is an entry-level handset running Android 4.1 Jelly Bean that's available through AT&T's newly minted prepaid network, Aio Wireless.

LG Xpression

The Xpression has a slider design in red, a full keyboard, a touch screen, and basic features for $49 with service.

LG Optimus Vu unlocked

The LG Optimus Vu is a ludicrously large mobile that packs some impressive hardware into its thin, light frame.

Samsung Galaxy Ace Plus

The Samsung Galaxy Ace Plus is a slightly souped-up version of the Galaxy Ace. Read on for our first impressions.

Editors' Choice

HTC Sensation 3G GSM

Its excellent design and user experience, coupled with its solid performance, make the HTC Sensation 4G one of the best Android phones yet and a top pick for T-Mobile customers.

Sagem Puma Phone

We'd change a few things about the Puma Phone, but it delivers a fun user experience that no phone can match. Just make your area has the proper coverage and enough sun.

Nokia N97 mini

The Nokia N97 Mini is a more stable and better designed device than the bigger N97, but its Achilles' heel remains as the confusing user interface keeps it behind today's leading touch-screen smartphones.

Google Nexus One

It doesn't have all the features we'd like, but the Nexus One greatly enhances the Google Android family with a fast processor, good call quality, and improved voice control features. What's more, we love that all versions of the phone will be unlocked.

Editors' Choice

Motorola Milestone

Android is still geeky around the edges, but the Motorola Milestone doesn't disappoint, thanks to its gorgeous screen, useful keyboard, heaps of apps and a handful of new features in the latest version of the little green robot

Nokia N900

While it has yet to reach its full potential, the Nokia N900 is a powerful mobile device with excellent browsing capabilities and vast customization options. However, its unintuitive interface and other limitations make this a smartphone for tech enthusiasts and early adopters only.

Samsung Galaxy I7500

Samsung has brought some crave-worthy hardware features to its first Android handset, the Galaxy i7500, like a gorgeous screen, good camera and plenty of on-board memory. But it runs on the bog-standard version of Android, which means it lacks multi-touch and fun custom widgets like we've seen on other phones. It also looks slightly dull. Overall, the Galaxy fails to reach the heady heights of the HTC Hero, but it's a strong competitor to the HTC Magic

HTC Touch Pro 2

The HTC Touch Pro2 certainly won't appeal to everyone, but, with its big, high-resolution screen and roomy keyboard, it'll tick the right boxes for some

HTC Touch Diamond2

The HTC Touch Diamond2 brings some notable improvements over its predecessor and promises to be a powerful touch-screen smartphone when it finally arrives in the U.S.