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Canon EOS 7D Mark II

The fixed LCD and lack of built-in wireless file transfer support may make some people cross it off their short list, but the Canon EOS 7D Mark II should please any Canon fan looking for speed.

Canon EOS Rebel T5

While it's a perfectly fine camera when you're making the jump from a point-and-shoot, there are better choices than the Canon EOS Rebel T5.

Nikon D610

Though competition's increasing for low-end full-frame cameras, the Nikon D610 holds its own; that said, while slightly faster than its predecessor it's not a whole lot different.

Nikon D7100

Implementation will be everything for the D7100 to be able to compete in a very different market than its predecessor faced. Can dropping the antialiasing filter on the sensor, weather-sealing the body, and improving performance and AF to keep it current do the job?

Editors' Choice

Nikon D600

The D600 represents excellent value for money. If you've been hankering after a full-frame dSLR and don't have a stash of rival lenses that you want to keep using, look this way. It's chunky, and a little bit heavy, but it's a camera that should serve you well for years to come.

Editors' Choice

Sony Alpha A57

The Sony Alpha SLT-A57 really delivers when paired with the 18-55mm kit lens. With bright, vibrant colours, plenty of fine detail and super-fast underlying hardware, it's easy to get great shots in practically any condition.

Sony Alpha A77V

The Sony Alpha SLT-A77V is an excellent, well-designed camera for deep-pocketed amateurs; it nevertheless has a few limitations that may make it impractical for professionals.

Canon EOS 60D

The Canon EOS 60D is a pumped-up powerhouse of a digital SLR. It's crammed full of class-leading but consumer-friendly features that could make it the only camera an amateur photography enthusiast will ever need.

Pentax K-x

A fast, inexpensive dSLR with better-than-average low-light quality, the Pentax K-x nevertheless has some flaws, such as unreliable image stabilization, to watch out for.

Olympus E-30

A great general-purpose dSLR, the Olympus E-30 offers an attractive alternative for advanced shooters not yet wedded to a system.

Nikon D700

As long as you don't need seriously high-resolution photos, video capture, or machine-gun-fast sports shooting, the Nikon D700 has everything you need in a pro full-frame camera for a reasonable price.

Pentax K20D

Pentax's 14MP K20D is a great choice for a midlevel SLR and offers a lot of bang for the buck.

Nikon D60

Despite modest improvements in performance and a couple of new features, Nikon's D60 fails to impress and costs more than some competing models.

Sony Alpha A200

The Sony Alpha DSLR-A200 is a solid entry-level dSLR that doesn't really stand out in its very competitive field.

Sony Alpha A700

A top-of-the-line amateur digital SLR camera, the Sony Alpha DSLR-A700 will delight Konica Minolta diehards and makes a great choice if you don't already have a stake in other lens systems.

Olympus Evolt E-510

The Olympus Evolt E-510 has quirky exposure and white-balance issues, but its Live View and Image Stabilization modes may make some photographers give this SLR a chance.

Sigma SD14

Sigma and Foveon fans, who have been waiting eagerly for this camera, might be interested in the SD14, but consumers can easily find more bang for their buck from other SLRs on the market.

Nikon D40x

The Nikon D40x makes a very nice first dSLR, though experienced SLR shooters looking for a Nikon should spend the extra cash for the D80.