Mirrorless system Cameras Reviews

Your Selections Clear All

  • Mirrorless system

Price

Manufacturer

Optical Sensor Size

Resolution

1 – 18 of 93 for: "Mirrorless system"
Sort by:

Sony Alpha A6000

Despite small annoyances, the Sony Alpha 6000 is a great overall camera for more advanced photographers who want something smaller than a dSLR, especially if they need the continuous- shooting speed.

Sony Alpha A7

Sony Alpha ILCE-7 (A7) is a great alternative to similarly priced entry-level full-frame dSLRs, as long as you don't need speedy continuous shooting.

Fujifilm X-T100

Fujifilm delivers another stylish mirrorless camera for the phone-camera-doesn't-cut-it-anymore set.

Sony A6500

With built-in image stabilization and touch focus for video, the A6500 addresses two of the biggest complaints about the A6300, plus a performance boost.

Nikon 1 J1

The Nikon 1 J1 is a fine camera, but there's nothing here that screams out "buy it" over similar competitors. It's also on the expensive side for a point-and-shoot upgrader, but has drawbacks for the more advanced user.

Editors' Choice

Samsung NX300

With a large touchscreen, built-in Wi-Fi and an APS-C sized sensor there's a lot to like about the Samsung NX300. It consistently produces high-quality shots, is easy to use -- even if you're a novice -- and ships with a copy of Adobe Photoshop Lightroom, all of which helps it justify its price tag.

Editors' Choice

Nikon 1 J3

Nikon's J series comes of age in this revision, with a higher resolution sensor, more extensive menus and a redesigned chassis. The Nikon 1 J3 the best-looking lens-swapping compact you can buy, and one of the best performers, too.

Olympus OM-D E-M1 Mark II

With an 18-frames-per second continuous-shooting speed, overhauled autofocus system and new options to support professionals, Olympus tries to lure them with zippy performance and compact design.

Canon EOS M50

The updated many-point autofocus system, 4K video support and more will be welcomed by Canon mirrorless fans.

Nikon 1 J2

If you need high-speed burst shooting and excellent low-light performance in an attractive and compact interchangeable lens camera, you'll find it with the Nikon 1 J2. However, the 10.1-megapixel resolution might limit what you can do with the output, and at this price, it feels a little mean.

Panasonic Lumix G9

Panasonic hopes a combination of speed, tonal tuning and body design will tempt serious photographers.

Olympus OM-D E-M5

If you're looking for something a lot better, faster, and more sophisticated than a point-and-shoot that can stand up to your adventures, the Olympus OM-D E-M5 is a great choice.

Editors' Choice

Panasonic Lumix GF5

The compact semi-pro Panasonic Lumix DMC-GF5 exceeded my expectations. It does a great job of rendering a high level of detail under all lighting conditions and its low light performance is particularly impressive. With a wide range of lenses, it offers the flexibility of a dSLR without the weight and bulk.

Olympus OM-D E-M10

Though it doesn't deliver the best photo quality, the sum of the Olympus OM-D E-M10's design, performance and features add up to a nice upgrade from a point-and-shoot.

Nikon 1 J4

Over a month ago, Nikon announced its Nikon 1 J4 everywhere but the US. Now it gets a little publicity boost by making it official here.

Nikon 1 S2

The latest in a line of sub-$500 ILC announcements this spring, Nikon's cheapest model certainly doesn't skimp on the performance specs.

Olympus PEN E-P3

While the Olympus PEN E-P3 shoots out in front of its class for performance and holds its own on features and design, it's a bit expensive and you'll need to tweak its JPEG settings to get the most out of its images.

Olympus PEN E-PL2

A great interchangeable-lens model if you're looking for better photo quality and/or a more advanced feature set than your current point-and-shoot offers, the Olympus PEN E-PL2 still doesn't satisfy for photographing active kids and pets.