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LG 32LC2D review: LG 32LC2D

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The Good Understated design; future-proof specification; advanced, user-friendly settings; decent performance.

The Bad Limited connectivity; background noise.

The Bottom Line Along with Samsung, LG is producing some of the most competitive affordable flat screens. The 32LC2D has a few failings but it's still excellent value for money

Visit manufacturer site for details.

7.5 Overall

Not so long ago, paying less than £1,000 for a large, flat-screen TV would have been deemed an absolute steal. But times they are a-changing and nowadays there's plenty of competition at around this price -- especially from the likes of Samsung and LG. Plus the latest affordable screens no longer suffer from the same compromises that afflicted earlier models.

LG's 32LC2D has added an integrated Freeview tuner to an impressive specification that includes high-definition compatibility, XD picture processing and enough features to embarrass more expensive alternatives. Our only gripe is its slightly limited connectivity, with just one RGB Scart and digital HDMI input -- which might distance high-definition devotees.

Picture performance at this price -- less than £800 if you hunt around online -- isn't going to equal the class leaders, but if you can ignore a few subtle flaws then you can save some money without being too disappointed.

Design
For a design constructed almost exclusively from plastic, the screen carries an air of elegance that belies its budget price. The matte-black finish and discreet styling may not be as immediately eye-catching as some recent glossy designs -- but it's less likely to impose on your living space or appear gimmicky in a few years' time.

The screen arrives with a self-assembly stand, but wall-mounting options are also available. LG has graciously included all the necessary nuts and bolts with the package, while the rear panel has been cut away to make connections easier to access from a hanging position.

There's a comprehensive array of connections to cater for a full variety of analogue and digital devices that will comprise most home entertainment setups. They include three Scarts (although only one is RGB-enabled and another can only be used for outputting DTV), progressive-scan compatible component inputs and an all-important HDMI digital input.

Ideally, we'd like to see dual HDMI options, which would allow you to simultaneously connect separate high-definition sources without having to switch cables or use expensive adaptors. There are similarly priced screens that afford this convenience if you want to accompany a hi-def TV receiver (such as Sky HD) with devices like an upscaling DVD player or Xbox 360.

Nonetheless, a connection count that also includes side-access AV inputs, a VGA PC input with audio and an optical output for surround-sound systems shouldn't be shirked at, especially at this price.

he reassuringly weighty remote is also a cut above the typically unsubstantial units that are often associated with such screens.

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