Sony Alpha DSLR-A300

The Good Straightforward live view; tilting LCD; great colour rendition.

The Bad Plasticky feel; noisy AF; weak kit lens.

The Bottom Line The A300 is not the only budget dSLR with live view, and its 10-megapixel resolution is pretty ordinary too. It feels crude and plasticky and the live view 'solution' is hardly elegant. But it is very practical, and in fact the whole camera has an appealing chunky, down-to-earth straightforwardness

Editors' Rating
8.3 Overall

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Sony Alpha DSLR-A300
Sony Alpha DSLR-A300
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Price £340 Typical Price £499 Amazon.co.uk £585 Amazon.co.uk £555 Amazon.co.uk £340 Typical Price
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Features ...
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Performance ...
8
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Image quality ...
8
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Review

Sony Alpha DSLR-A300

Any self-respecting dSLR has to offer live view these days, but they all rely on clunky mirror movements and need cool-running CMOS sensors. All except this one. Sony's DSLR-A300 uses a regular 10-megapixel CCD and offers instant live view at the flick of a switch, and via a neat tilting LCD too. It can be yours for around £340.

Positives
Sony's live view system is either cheap and crappy or brilliantly simple, depending on whether you like your engineering elegant or you just want it to work. Other live view systems flip the mirror up and open the shutter so that the image falls on to the sensor and gets fed to the LCD. Sony doesn't bother with all that nonsense. Instead, it simply deflects some of the light on to a secondary, lower-resolution sensor in the pentaprism, and it's this that produces the live image. You activate it with a sliding switch on the top of the camera. Instantly, a little shutter blocks off the viewfinder eyepiece and the live image appears on the LCD. There's no clanking of mirrors and no permanently-open shutter leaving your sensor open to dust particles. It's not an elegant solution, but it's a damned good one.

That's not the only good thing about this camera. Sony's built-in Super SteadyShot anti-shake system works with any compatible lens, and thanks to a battery life of 750 shots (unless you use the live view a lot), you can shoot all day on a single charge. The Sony's pictures are really clear and vibrant, and the detail is good too. But wouldn't you get even more detail with the 14-megapixel DSLR-A350? Well, it does offer another 4 million pixels, but it doesn't really capitalise on them and overall the detail is pretty similar.

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